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  # 490887 8-Jul-2011 03:13
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I dont know if anyone cares, but go here
http://www.facebook.com/FairGoNZ?ref=ts&sk=wall#!/FairGoNZ

Click Like, and then comment away.

I am quite sure 20 people saying 240k is much faster than dial up might be noticed by some producer somewhere. Maybe. 
 




Ray Taylor
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For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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  # 490938 8-Jul-2011 09:43
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old3eyes: The other issue I feel is that Fair Go has lost it's original goals and is now trying to emulate that crappy consumer program in 3 called Target. If it's all about a sensationalist story then it's got to sell. I removed Fair Go of my season pass some weeks ago after that "expos?" of Subway using the same knife to cut two consecutive sandwiches..


Yep, exactly the same thing. And hasn't improved - still the mediocre  rubbish on the occasional times I switch over to it. At least Target has a bit of chuckle value ..

 




My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


 
 
 
 


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  # 491126 8-Jul-2011 15:12
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... and the Target chick is hotter.

Ali is getting a bit long in the tooth now.

:)

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  # 491157 8-Jul-2011 15:48
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SepticSceptic:

Yep, exactly the same thing. And hasn't improved - still the mediocre  rubbish on the occasional times I switch over to it. At least Target has a bit of chuckle value ..

 


Yes - chuckling or laughing at how excited that guy can get over a soap or jam trial.
He annoys me and should go back to kids afternoon tv.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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  # 491285 8-Jul-2011 21:43
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Beccara:
BlakJak:
Beccara:
Jaxar:
Firstly the 240Kb being slower than dialup. Sure I don't expect the guy who made the comment to have a clue. Am I naive tto think Fair Go has a responsibility to clarify that 240Kb is roughly 4x faster than dialup?


From a technical perspective yes but Fair Go viewers are hardly the type, These days trying to surf even at a basic level and a 256k connection will feel slower than dialup connection because the size of content on even the most basic news page is huge compared to what it was back when dialup your only choice so from a "User Experience" POV I believe the statement to be correct


Is this based on experience?

There's still plenty of folks surfing the web on dialup, and unless you're one of them I think it'd be better to stick with facts, not hyperbole.




Ever tried browsing the net on a capped 64k connection? Yes I'm aware that the various queuing methods degrade the connection more but it's still painful, more painful than dialup was. And yes it's based on experience, Trademe for example, the front page is a 14-20 second load time on dial up which it wasn't back in the day when dial up was the common access method but enough of the derail :)


I was an Xnet customer when their queueing was majorly broken.  So yes :-)
But I have to admit I havnt' used dialup speeds in a while myself, and that a lot of content is relatively big (taking advantage of broadband).
But I know that the ISP I work for still has a goodly number of dialup accounts active...




No signature to see here, move along...

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  # 491403 9-Jul-2011 13:28
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Beccara:
BlakJak:
Beccara:
Jaxar:
Firstly the 240Kb being slower than dialup. Sure I don't expect the guy who made the comment to have a clue. Am I naive tto think Fair Go has a responsibility to clarify that 240Kb is roughly 4x faster than dialup?


From a technical perspective yes but Fair Go viewers are hardly the type, These days trying to surf even at a basic level and a 256k connection will feel slower than dialup connection because the size of content on even the most basic news page is huge compared to what it was back when dialup your only choice so from a "User Experience" POV I believe the statement to be correct


Is this based on experience?

There's still plenty of folks surfing the web on dialup, and unless you're one of them I think it'd be better to stick with facts, not hyperbole.




Ever tried browsing the net on a capped 64k connection? Yes I'm aware that the various queuing methods degrade the connection more but it's still painful, more painful than dialup was. And yes it's based on experience, Trademe for example, the front page is a 14-20 second load time on dial up which it wasn't back in the day when dial up was the common access method but enough of the derail :)

I do get throttled to 64k sometimes. I find trademe and banking websites are fine, GZ is slow (presumably due to latency) and many websites just timeout waiting for java, advertising or graphics etc.




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  # 491446 9-Jul-2011 16:22
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In my experience the way the shaping to 64k is done by many ISP's does result in worse performance than actual dial up.




 
 
 
 


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  # 491483 9-Jul-2011 19:21
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BlakJak: What would solve everything would be if folks actually communicated the honest truth when approached by customers or potential customers.  In this case Telecom customer service didn't do adequate checking and made some blanket statements without explaining the caveats - which are quite fair. ADSL is a 'best effort' service and there's no garuntees as to service or performance, even once it's fitted :(

I agree that its a key responsibility of each provider to communicate that there are limitations and uncertainty surrounding the ability (or not) of connecting "broadband" at a particular location. However, I have found that there are plenty of people who want to over-simplify the service without being willing to pay for the sort of guarantees they expect will just be handed to them. It really is a technical service, and if service providers say its not available then some people seem to think broadband should be a kind of ubiquitous basic right for everybody. Sometimes this even happens when the location is obviously in an area that would be challenging to roll-out any service at all.

I think we have to get rid of the "Kiwishare" system that forces other providers to subsidise uneconomic lines that can't even carry ADSL, and then expand the RBI programme to something more provider-neutral that encourages fair competition among the many wireless providers that can serve non fixed-line broadband customers. Maybe the government will actually sort that out one day, or maybe not. UFB can still improve the uncertainty since coverage areas and line performance are more predictable.

In terms of Telecom reps simply saying "its available" or not, they don't promise that a service will always be successfully connected despite availablity. Of course that should be explained to customers, but many people choose to ignore such disclaimers and we also know how many ISPs get wrongly accused over house wiring issues. So yes, more information tends to raise expectations but such information should not be simplified to the extent that it sounds like a guarantee because few people understand the implicit limitations of saying "its available in your area".

While house wiring can be fixed, I wonder if the best way to guarantee that ADSL is available would be to order naked ADSL on a second line under your own account, and to test it before buying the house. If ADSL cant be connected at the required speed for whatever reason, its a small cost to cancel the service and buy another house. The seller could agree a jackpoint being installed inside to test the service, and that gives you the certainty you need.




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  # 491500 9-Jul-2011 20:06
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Ragnor: In my experience the way the shaping to 64k is done by many ISP's does result in worse performance than actual dial up.





100% Agreed. Usable is the way I would describe it. Dial up is slow but usable in a pinch.



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  # 491607 10-Jul-2011 10:56
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webwat: I wonder if the best way to guarantee that ADSL is available would be to order naked ADSL on a second line under your own account, and to test it before buying the house. If ADSL cant be connected at the required speed for whatever reason, its a small cost to cancel the service and buy another house. The seller could agree a jackpoint being installed inside to test the service, and that gives you the certainty you need.


The best solution is to make your purchase subject to the supply of broadband.

The onus needs to be put plainly on the real estate agent.

"Hey mate, I'll buy this house if you can show me the water is connected, that the pressure on the shower is good and that I can use my laptop"

If I can't have a good hot shower, and use my laptop then I don't want to know, it's not like there's a shortage of housing in this country.






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  # 491711 10-Jul-2011 17:45
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This is not far from reality. We bought our house six years ago and the condition was to have TelstraClear cable modem service. We compiled a list of addresses and if TelstraClear didn't say "Yes, we can provide the service there" we didn't even bother looking.






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  # 491717 10-Jul-2011 18:17
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freitasm: This is not far from reality. We bought our house six years ago and the condition was to have TelstraClear cable modem service. We compiled a list of addresses and if TelstraClear didn't say "Yes, we can provide the service there" we didn't even bother looking.


The key question here is, did you take TelstraClears word on it or insist on seeing an active connection before you signed up?






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  # 491723 10-Jul-2011 18:38

DonGould:
webwat: I wonder if the best way to guarantee that ADSL is available would be to order naked ADSL on a second line under your own account, and to test it before buying the house. If ADSL cant be connected at the required speed for whatever reason, its a small cost to cancel the service and buy another house. The seller could agree a jackpoint being installed inside to test the service, and that gives you the certainty you need.


The best solution is to make your purchase subject to the supply of broadband.

The onus needs to be put plainly on the real estate agent.

"Hey mate, I'll buy this house if you can show me the water is connected, that the pressure on the shower is good and that I can use my laptop"

If I can't have a good hot shower, and use my laptop then I don't want to know, it's not like there's a shortage of housing in this country.




From my experience with agents, they will only say 'to the best of their knowledge' so they won't guarantee anything whatsoever. Really it is up to the buyer to check everything out, or get a lawyer and property inspector to. A really  good property inspection should pick up that sort of thing to, as internet connection tests should be on their checklists, along with TV aerial reception etc.
It would be very difficult to make a purchase conditional on broadband, as you may not know until you have purchased the property and attempted to connect it up, as to whether they will connect you. It is virtually impossible with an auction or tender. I wonder how many people have purchased a property , only to find there are no available ports at the exchange to connect them.

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  # 491893 11-Jul-2011 10:04
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DonGould:
webwat: I wonder if the best way to guarantee that ADSL is available would be to order naked ADSL on a second line under your own account, and to test it before buying the house. If ADSL cant be connected at the required speed for whatever reason, its a small cost to cancel the service and buy another house. The seller could agree a jackpoint being installed inside to test the service, and that gives you the certainty you need.


The best solution is to make your purchase subject to the supply of broadband.

The onus needs to be put plainly on the real estate agent.

"Hey mate, I'll buy this house if you can show me the water is connected, that the pressure on the shower is good and that I can use my laptop"

If I can't have a good hot shower, and use my laptop then I don't want to know, it's not like there's a shortage of housing in this country.




No vendor in their right mind would agree to this. No Real estate agent would agree to be responsible for such a thing if they had a brain in their head. If Telecom won't guarantee until connection, there is no chance anyone else would if they have any brains!


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