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  Reply # 45027 30-Aug-2006 18:54
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Fraktul: Secondly these are Australian figures for Australian lines and population densitys, while these are not as disparate as other western countries I would put money on the the population density of Auckland being lower than Sydney and their local loop being is in better average condition than ours.


Actually those figures in the iiNet report were based on a suburb in Perth WA.  The population density is very much the same as NZ.  The ground water has a great deal of iorn in it and the quality of the ULL is poor with a great number of problems.  The termination equipment they use in the streets is much poorer than that used in NZ in many places - by my observation.

Fraktul:  Dont get me wrong I'm not saying the sky is falling, I'm simply pointing out with the current network infrastructure that giving a "full speed DSL service" is going to result in expectations not meeting up with reality for a lot of users.


I think you actaully hit the nail on the head.  This is an 'expectation' setting exercise isn't it.

I agree with the implication that business managers, who think that rolling out thousands of 8 and 24mbit ports on the network is the solution to being able to get bbTV, are going to be disapointed.  There is much more to it than this. 

I'm going to have another swig of my beer and keep watching, no real supprises to be seen here.

Cheers Don




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  Reply # 45028 30-Aug-2006 18:55
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Fraktul: Also what they have mentioned is tigher controls on CPE devices, eg power levels used and backoff behaviour. This is hard to implement after the fact however with so much gear already out there.


No. This is stilly.

What they should do is some simple modem testing like the APC magazine did a few month ago.

There is no difference here between the days of dial up, where customers who purchased cheap modems got poorer results.

Tightening up the controls is only going to reduce the choice of product out here. For many people, a cheap modem is all that's required.

If my connection ran at ~500k up and anything up to 5mb down I'd be fairly happy based on my current requirments.

Cheers Don


Not is not silly, your modem didnt effect other peoples connections if it was crap.

Telecom already require devices be telepermitted so why not ensure devices play nicely together, after all the the whole point of the telepermitting in the first place.

Anyhow I have already said this is going to be impossible to implement retroactively, I'm just disagreeing with your analogy and reasoning :)

Going forward on Telepermitted devices I think they should implement this however.

 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 45029 30-Aug-2006 19:17
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Actually those figures in the iiNet report were based on a suburb in Perth WA. The population density is very much the same as NZ.


I thought there were several suburbs figures example and maps given, the majority in Sydney?


The termination equipment they use in the streets is much poorer than that used in NZ in many places - by my observation.


Hmm last time I checked some of the 80 year old copper in Mt Eden still had paper/tar insulation :) I'm sure they have their fair share of crap infrastructure too however.


Fraktul: Dont get me wrong I'm not saying the sky is falling, I'm simply pointing out with the current network infrastructure that giving a "full speed DSL service" is going to result in expectations not meeting up with reality for a lot of users.


I think you actaully hit the nail on the head. This is an 'expectation' setting exercise isn't it.

I agree with the implication that business managers, who think that rolling out thousands of 8 and 24mbit ports on the network is the solution to being able to get bbTV, are going to be disapointed. There is much more to it than this.

I'm going to have another swig of my beer and keep watching, no real supprises to be seen here.

Cheers Don


Indeed and the whole uh oh my modems retraining every X hours so my video stream/VoIP call/Citrix session/EFTPOS transaction sufferes a nasty death is also a pain in the proverbial. (yes people are deploying EFTPOS on UBS *cringe*)

"what do you mean its a best effort, Internet grade service" Try explaining to somebody the Telecom target availability is 99% for UBS. Thats 3.56 days of downtime a year in a time where many businesses require a Internet connection to function...expectations, expectations.

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  Reply # 45108 31-Aug-2006 20:36

CPE is something that seriously needs attention on Telecom's network. Using a cheap taiwanese ADSL router I have recorded an uninteruppted service (showtime and uptime) of over 200 days.

On the other hand, I have seen what you might call a "d-link graveyard"; hundreds of d-link ADSL modem-routers thrown away to a recycling company. I believe this says something about the quality of dlink modems. Saying they have a 10% fault rate would be generous. I have seen them constantly fail even when connected to a DSLAM within <200m of copper.

I think some of them work though. :-)




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  Reply # 45123 1-Sep-2006 09:42
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barf: CPE is something that seriously needs attention on Telecom's network. Using a cheap taiwanese ADSL router I have recorded an uninteruppted service (showtime and uptime) of over 200 days.

On the other hand, I have seen what you might call a "d-link graveyard"; hundreds of d-link ADSL modem-routers thrown away to a recycling company. I believe this says something about the quality of dlink modems. Saying they have a 10% fault rate would be generous. I have seen them constantly fail even when connected to a DSLAM within <200m of copper.

I think some of them work though. :-)

I have constant dropouts with my DLINK 604T Wireless ADSL, and less if i use my 302G

ugh







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