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  Reply # 589959 3-Mar-2012 18:54
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Just a small comment from me,

Most of my sites are solar powered so when the power goes out, they continue to run.
I am sure on Waiheke island, Ynet would be in the same situation - mains power is expensive to get installed and so solar becomes cheaper and more reliable.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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  Reply # 589970 3-Mar-2012 19:14
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Talkiet:
DonGould: [snip]
Most of us have cordless phones which don't work when the power is out and we quickly found that if you're on a cabinet based phone service then those fail after a time as well.  [snip]


Please define "cabinet based phone service". I'm unaware of any such services that 'fail after a time' (after a quake knocks out power)..

There were some landlines that were (understandably) knocked out by huge copper cable bundle being literally ripped apart...

Cellphones are brilliant in emergencies often, but try telling someone how great a cellphone is if the only tower that they can use falls into a hole in the ground, or if their battery is flat.

Many people (including myself) still have a landline because it's more reliable than anything else. I don't even give my number out to anyone, and the ringer is permanently set to silent... but I do have it...

Cheers - N



So what are you going to do with UFB, have a fibre and VOIP services for normal use and then an old POTS line for emergencies?

If you have a problem deal with it, people used to 100 years ago without 111! 





 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 589972 3-Mar-2012 19:14
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bbqroast: Hey!
We are on a Telecom package that gives us 50GB of broadband a month for about $105 + phone line. The speeds jump around between 5 and 2 MBit/s for download and 0.5~ MBit/s for upload, recently 2 MBit/s is far more common :(.


We had a guy from the local ISP YNet come and check for line of sight, we saw symmetric 20Megabit/second results on speed test!
I run a server so upload is important. The only downside is YNet is a lot more expensive, we will probably keep a regular phone instead of getting VOIP (mainly due to the fact that regular older land line phones work in power cuts).

So should we get YNet?
Also does YNet have backup power for its stations? (Obviously we will need something to run our equipment but that is a waste if they can't run theirs).
Edit: Oops. Forgot to say I'm on Waiheke Island. 


What kind of server you hosting. Sure it wouldn't be better to host it at a datacentre? 





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  Reply # 590044 3-Mar-2012 22:31
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Zeon:
So what are you going to do with UFB, have a fibre and VOIP services for normal use and then an old POTS line for emergencies?

If you have a problem deal with it, people used to 100 years ago without 111! 


If you have UFB you won't have a POTS line anymore! How many are going to be paying another $50 a month just for an "emergency" POTS line?
If your exchange/cabinet loses power, guess what, your POTS line won't work either!


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