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240 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 127103 30-Jul-2013 09:48
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I have recently purchased some upgrade components for my personal music pc (used for music production etc).

When I 1st put the PC together, after running for a short time getting Win8 setup, the PSU started making a clicking noise, which then started increasing in frequency.  Almost sounded like a static discharge of sorts.  I ran several tests, including running the PSU on its own, running it in another computer etc.  It only made the clicking noise in my PC setup.  So I got an RMA and the replacement one stopped making the clicking noise.

Now after being away for a month the PC was running in low power mode.  I just realised last night after using the PC for a few hours, a distinct hum or whine was coming from the speakers.  I turned them off, and the whine continued, which I traced back to the PSU.
I shut the PC down and the noise stops, but as soon as I powered it back up again the noise began again, and when the speakers are on the noise is amplified.

My initial thoughts are Coil Whine, as I checked the fans and they are not causing the noise at all.  My PC setup is listed below.  If anyone has a suggestion I am willing to listen. 

My next step will be to run the PC from a UPS to see if that helps.  Also going to put my other PSU in which was not making any noises last time I tried.

Thanks..

This is what was upgraded:
 - Adata 2*8GB Dual Retail Kit DDR3 1600 DIMM
 - Intel Core i7 3770 3.40GHz 8MB LGA1155 - HD GRAPHICS - IVY Bridge
 - ADATA SP900 128GB SATA3 SSD 2.5
 - Silverstone Strider Plus 600W Modular ActivePFC ATX 80plus Silver PSU
 - Gigabyte GA-B75M-D3H MATX VGA LGA1155 v1.2

I also have the old components:
- Original case (quite old)
- M-Audio Audiophile 192 PCI audio card
- Standard office use PCI-E Graphics card (no additional power plugs required)
- 80GB Western Digital SATA HDD

External peripherals:
- USB connected & powered large audio keybaord
- PS2 keyboard
- USB mouse
- 2x DVI monitors
- 2x Behringer Truth Monitors b2031a (speakers) plugged into the M-Audio audio sound card

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240 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 869248 31-Jul-2013 12:50
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Tested PC out of case (to rule out earthing) and removed all peripherals and cards and the noise still occurs with the PSU and just the MB.

Changed the PSU to an older one I had around, and the noise has gone away (thank goodness).

I also worked out the PSU noise is amplifying PC data noise. not sure why, but it is.  So when a program loads you can hear it, and if you move the mouse around you can hear that also.

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 869652 31-Jul-2013 23:51
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I'm not sure that I know what I'm talking about here, but, could it be possible the motherboard is sending a 'dirty' ground signal back to the PSU that some internal part is twigging to, that maybe the older PSU tolerated better?

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  Reply # 869666 1-Aug-2013 01:13
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Have heard this heaps and just ended up putting a different PSU in. Also you will get noise from the power supply on the mother board which may interact differently with different power supplies. I have no idea why they allow them to operate down into the audible frequencies but I suspect its to get higher efficiencies under certain loads that it changes the frequency down that low.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 869679 1-Aug-2013 07:26
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ups should hopefully solve ur ground current causing the speaker humm. at least thats what i've been led to believe.




HTPC: Intel i3-2100 / 12GB RAM / AMD HD7750 / 480 GB SSD / 58TB Storage / MediaPortal / MadVR / Win10
AVR: Pioneer Elite SC-LX87 220W 9.2 Ch AVR
Speakers: Wharfedale Jade 7 Fronts / Jade 2c Center / Jade 5 Rears
Subs: iNuke 3000dsp 3000W proamp with 4x 15" JBL Sealed Subs
Display: Samsung 60" UA60H6400 LCD TV
Accessories: Gefen HDMI Detective with splitter


170 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 869765 1-Aug-2013 10:40
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Swap out the power supply to a different brand, that's an odd one. 550/600 watt is the perfect requirement for you also.

Weird issue.



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 869772 1-Aug-2013 10:50
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@kiwijunglist:  Yea I thought that would be the case too, But no matter what combination of UPS I used (UPS for speakers, UPS for PC) I could not get rid of the hum.

@zCelicaDude: Done, changed the PSU to my older 535 model of different brand, and all my issues have gone away.

Retested the the PSU without anything connect, except power from the wall, and tested again at work and its definitely generating some sort of sound (much quieter without being plugged into the motherboard).  The supplier has agreed this sounds like a faulty PSU (although I suspect this brand is still incompatible with something on my setup).  So just getting a refund.  Happy that other PSU is functioning well and quiet.

I now no longer have to listen to a rather horrible squeal/hum when no audio is coming out.  And no longer worried that the computer PSU is going to explode.  Thanks for the input =)

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  Reply # 869773 1-Aug-2013 10:51
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A 300W power supply would be more than enough for a standard build like that. Check out the PSU Calculator.




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
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Master Geek
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  Reply # 869775 1-Aug-2013 10:54
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A 300watt power supply would suffice, but then leaves no room for upgrading .. i.e. Gaming graphics card, additional hard drives etc ;)

It's always better to have more power then less, his PC will only consume the amount that it requires, so no worries

Scotty

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 869790 1-Aug-2013 11:17
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Thinking about the speaker noise and just realised you were using a PCI audio card, did you try using the motherboards on board audio, moving the card to a different slot, etc? PCI slots use 5vdc, what are the 5vdc ratings on the different power supplys?

Still sounds like that PSU was faulty.



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 869839 1-Aug-2013 11:53
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Yea, the Audiophile card is required because it controls input/output timing for my music production software & hardware.
Its like a very budget pro-audio box that would normally sit outside a Mac pc (which also reduces noise being outside the pc) connected via firewire.
It has 2 separate output leads as each speaker has its own powered amp built in. Admittedly the cable leads going from soundcard to speakers is not exactly professional shielded audio cable. But never had an issue before, so ruled that out. I cannot get the same quality of sound and the correct format from a built in motherboard card.

I originally thought all the noise coming via the speakers was because the PCI slots were much closer to the CPU and Mainboard chipsets (as the new motherboard is about half the size). I also thought the on board graphics was the cause, so put in the PCI-E graphics card, which made no change (except now there is less CPU load and my software does not crash anymore which is also a good thing).


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