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  Reply # 1059921 5-Jun-2014 17:23
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surfisup1000: I've had my ocz vertex 2 for around 4 years and it is still running strongly -- used extensively for OS drive for 3 years and last year installed into my file server and still used a lot. 


But, I expect it to fail at any time really. Can't complain, has done me well. 



same here. relegated to "netbook" (actually an old laptop)

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  Reply # 1060213 6-Jun-2014 08:14
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I remember reading somewhere, that even under heavy reads and writes an SSD should still put up with the torture compared to a metal disk.  I believe their target was 5 years, but that was for the later SSD variations. (EDIT: I think it was AnandTech but I can't find the article)

My Mushkin is still going strong 2 years on.  Just need to find a motherboard to keep up and start maxing it out!





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  Reply # 1060232 6-Jun-2014 09:03
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DravidDavid: I remember reading somewhere, that even under heavy reads and writes an SSD should still put up with the torture compared to a metal disk.  I believe their target was 5 years, but that was for the later SSD variations.


The enemy of SSDs is high volumes of write transactions, as the cells can only be written X number of times before they wear out.  Enterprise environments using SSDs as dumping grounds for large volumes of frequently changing data can wear out SSDs in less than a year.  I've read that some data centres with this sort of usage patterns prefer to frequently replace SSDs than to use more expensive RAM drives that don't wear out (and have a battery to preserve the data when the system is powered off).

This is of course not the typical use of a private or small business SSD user.




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