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867 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1208593 5-Jan-2015 14:30
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This where I've ended up - http://nz.pcpartpicker.com/user/cutcutcut/saved/xTB48d


I'm waiting for a price from Computer lounge currently. I think I'll have to drop the video card for now and just use  my old one and update  it later, same with the ram, add some more later.
It's not quite as high-spec'd as I would ideally like but due to the budget constraints, I think it's a good starting point.

JWR

738 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1208898 6-Jan-2015 06:21


Just having one 8GB memory module will impact performance compared to having two 4GB modules (single channel RAM vs dual channel).

Of course, if you intend to buy another 8GB later on, then it is possibly better to buy just one now.

It all depends on how much RAM you think you might ultimately end up with i.e. 16GB - 32GB in a fully populated board.



867 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1208919 6-Jan-2015 07:39
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JWR:
Just having one 8GB memory module will impact performance compared to having two 4GB modules (single channel RAM vs dual channel).

Of course, if you intend to buy another 8GB later on, then it is possibly better to buy just one now.

It all depends on how much RAM you think you might ultimately end up with i.e. 16GB - 32GB in a fully populated board.


I thought that might be the case. How much do you think it would effect performance? Ultimately, depending on price, between 16 and 32. Perhaps 2 x 4GB night be better short term though, still 2 slots left.

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1208920 6-Jan-2015 07:40
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Agree that 2x4GB is better. That motherboard has four slots so you can go to 16 or 24GB easily, though unless you're working with something specialised there's little gain for most people. Especially so if using an SSD, which I hope you are.




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JWR

738 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 236


  Reply # 1208927 6-Jan-2015 08:06

CutCutCut:
JWR:
Just having one 8GB memory module will impact performance compared to having two 4GB modules (single channel RAM vs dual channel).

Of course, if you intend to buy another 8GB later on, then it is possibly better to buy just one now.

It all depends on how much RAM you think you might ultimately end up with i.e. 16GB - 32GB in a fully populated board.


I thought that might be the case. How much do you think it would effect performance? Ultimately, depending on price, between 16 and 32. Perhaps 2 x 4GB night be better short term though, still 2 slots left.



Actually, it probably won't make much, if any, noticeable difference on most applications you could run.

Modern CPUs like the core i5 5690k have a lot of CPU cache. So that will help offset RAM speed a lot.

However, I am sure you could find some applications where it would make a noticeable difference, even if they are only synthetic benchmarks.

I have 5820k CPU that can run single, dual or quad channel.

Currently, I am running dual channel. But, I did run single channel for a few weeks while I waited for a faulty RAM module to be replaced.

I haven't really noticed any difference between dual and single.

I will get another couple of 8GB modules sometime and run full quad channel. But, it isn't a high priority.



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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1208951 6-Jan-2015 09:05
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Are you intending to overclock your CPU? If you are, you will need to add a good CPU cooler. If not, you can drop to a non-overclocking CPU (without the K) and possibly a cheaper motherboard (H97 instead of Z97). 

For the Intel i-5 CPU's, you should also consider whether the 4690 CPU justifies the price premium over the 4460 and 4590 CPU's.

In the last year I have read in various PC building discussions that builds with an Intel i-7 CPU and 16-32 GB RAM build are better suited for video editing use (something about hyper-threading ? and large file sizes). There are some video editing applications that do not use a graphics card in the video editing process. Intel i-5 builds are usually recommended for a gaming build where the graphics card is a significant component.



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