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Topic # 161939 24-Jan-2015 09:59
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So gmail changed some security settings a while back.
They implemented "Access for less secure apps".
With it switched on (blocked - which is the default) it means that email programs (Windows live mail, Outlook, Thunderbird etc) cant log in any more.
It will only work via androids gmail program or via a browser browser - I understand this uses a protocol called Oauth2.

I have searched but cant find any mail clients (pref free) that support the Oauth2 protocol that gmail would need.

The other option is to enable access for less secure apps - but I dont really want to do this if I can avoid it.

Anyone had any experience with this or know a client that works?




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  Reply # 1221280 24-Jan-2015 10:26
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Thunderbird works fine with gmail using IMAP and SMTP.




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  Reply # 1221316 24-Jan-2015 11:49
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have you tried pop peeper? it has web mail plugin and imap and pop for gmail

as far as i see they all work still for me



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  Reply # 1221341 24-Jan-2015 13:02
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Perhaps I should clarify.
My gmail got hacked so at some stage I seem to have set the "Access for less secure apps" to disabled - maybe after running 2 factor authentication for a time (since disabled) - I gather "Access for less secure apps" to disabled  may be moving to a default setting these days.
On reading about it it looks like perhaps its a good idea to leave this setting to 'disabled' - but it blocks the usual windows email programs from working.

However with this setting on "enabled" it will work fine with the usual thunderbird, windows live mail, outlook  etc.
I have searched and searched but cant find any windows mail programs that seem to support Oauth2 - so it looks like I need to set "Access for less secure apps" to Enabled.  Seems a pity really.







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  Reply # 1221342 24-Jan-2015 13:06
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I thought they had a setting so its geo ips and checks its a NZ ip address to allow connection?

hadnt looked lately.

if you changed password and no weird emails then you probably ok again.

after all dont they reset using mobile number its hard for hackers to do that.. unless they cloned your mob#
too.

just setup all that and change password again if not.

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  Reply # 1221344 24-Jan-2015 13:08
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contact the developer of pop peeper.. what I use all the time.. its a great program espc for win 7/8

im sure he have a update or something in the works for Oauth2

he seems to answer all my emails and proactive developer.. I like that in a person no indian help desks :)




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  Reply # 1221366 24-Jan-2015 14:28
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kiwigeek1: contact the developer of pop peeper.. what I use all the time.. its a great program espc for win 7/8

im sure he have a update or something in the works for Oauth2

he seems to answer all my emails and proactive developer.. I like that in a person no indian help desks :)



Thanks - had a play with it - I think mainly because it defaults to pop access to gmail.
When I had a read and changed it to IMAP it didnt like it and seemed to be groaning about the login failing.
Maybe the Oauth2 thingy is applicable only to IMAP.
I quite like IMAP.
Will need to do some more homework.

Will have a further play....





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  Reply # 1221371 24-Jan-2015 14:36
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pop peppers webmail works as well. it scrapes it and simulates imap.

imap is way better.. I havent used pop for a while now.. but pop peeper works with all and allows to
get headers only and read ones you want and delete others

new build will have spam controls.. I bought the addon pack to have folders to save emails etc

its very advance program

but i did read on their forum www.poppeeper.com

others reports 0auth2 issue nov 2014 last year but I say hes looking into it



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  Reply # 1221407 24-Jan-2015 15:45
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Did find something interesting. Its potentially a solution to my problem.
Couldnt find this anywhere on the internet - and am usually quite good at finding things!

So you have the Access for less secure apps = enabled.
This stops Outlook, Thunderbird, Opera mail, Windows live mail from working with IMAP.

Log into gmail on a browser and enable 2 factor authentication on your gmail account.
It sends a code to your phone each time you want to log in to gmail (annoying but secure).
Once this is turned on I blundered into a section under gmail that lets you set passwords for apps that dont support 2 factor authentication.
This generates a 16 digit pass key (instead of your usual password) that you can use along with your gmail account logname/email address .
Use this in your windows program as your credentials.
Your email program now works fine.
Log back into gmail via your browser and turn 2 factor authentication off.

Windows program still works fine and Access for less secure apps = enabled is still active.
Seems to have done what I want.

I would swear I cant find this info anywhere on the web - but it is a big place....




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  Reply # 1221499 24-Jan-2015 18:04
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it may say its enabled but probably is not? might be a gmail bug in how you did it

you might have a new passsword though


i would still wait for a pop peeper way to do it :)

good luck

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  Reply # 1221517 24-Jan-2015 18:43
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You have to enable IMAP in your gmail settings. You may've done this already.




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  Reply # 1221519 24-Jan-2015 18:48
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timmmay: You have to enable IMAP in your gmail settings. You may've done this already.


Yep - did that years ago.




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  Reply # 1221522 24-Jan-2015 18:55
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Hmm, interesting. So enabling the "Access for less secure apps" works in much the same way as dealing with apps when you use 2-factor authentication. Or do you use that as well?

If you are using 2-factor then app password is the only solution, as far as I know. Set an app password for each email program you want to use, and then easily destroy that app password if you loose control of a service, computer etc. That way you can make sure you can easily revoke access to your email address at any time. Its a nice security feature.

BTW: 2 factor authentication really is the way to go. And of course - always making sure you never reuse a password anywhere. (So always have separate passwords for every service you use). 






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  Reply # 1221532 24-Jan-2015 19:08
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jarledb: Hmm, interesting. So enabling the "Access for less secure apps" works in much the same way as dealing with apps when you use 2-factor authentication. Or do you use that as well?



Well not really - maybe its a loophole I have found, but it looks like if you have 2 factor switched on you can generate a password for your app which google remembers and thinks is ok after you have switched the 2 factor business back off.
The Access for less secure apps was disabled the whole time and still is - by rights theoretically the app should probably not be working - I am just glad it is.

If I tried to install another window mail app maybe I could use the 16 digit string (If I had noted it down), but otherwise the app would just fail with regular logname/password combo.




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  Reply # 1221606 24-Jan-2015 22:46
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If you enable app specific passwords then you should be able to usw those big long random passwords to login to your account rather than your normal Gmail password. That's what I use for apps that give me problems.





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