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  Reply # 1782568 15-May-2017 14:17
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richms:

 

 

 

Its when people do stupid things like allow unsupported operating systems to browse the net or have email or be on the same lan as computers with customer data etc that the IT staff have to tell them no.

 

 

everyone is ignoring the REAL WORLD security issue is the user , not if the OS or if its patched or not.
Thats why fully patched Win7/10 PC's can get infected while unpatched/NEVER patched XP's can go without ever having infections/malware

 

Sure , better to be fully up to date with Win patches, but lets not pretend lack of updates is the cause of most malware infections .
When XP was current, most XP PC's I saw werent even doing winupdates: didnt cause meltdowns .

 

Last year, known Win7 update issues saw many thousands of Win7 PC's stop updating for several months, wasnt that big an issue (most didnt even notice).
There are still many XP PC's out there in NZ businesses. They arnt the big security issue. Users opening bogus emails & clicking on links & attachments is.

 

IT make suggestions , they cant dictate to management/owners .
They can choose to walk away from the job of course, its then someone else's issue, but nothing will have changed .

 

 


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  Reply # 1782577 15-May-2017 14:42
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1101:

 

 

 

They arnt the big security issue. Users opening bogus emails & clicking on links & attachments is.

 



In this case a computer can still become infected without even opening an email


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1782578 15-May-2017 14:45
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wpcharged:

 

In this case a computer can still become infected without even opening an email

 

 

Only if they are on a network that has been infected.

 

 





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gzt

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  Reply # 1782663 15-May-2017 15:47
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and only if SMB1 is enabled.

Edit: on the target

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  Reply # 1782664 15-May-2017 15:51
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Rikkitic:

 

wpcharged:

 

In this case a computer can still become infected without even opening an email

 

 

Only if they are on a network that has been infected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The worm functionality attempts to infect unpatched Windows machines in the local network. At the same time, it also executes massive scanning on Internet IP addresses to find and infect other vulnerable computers."

From the microsoft blog:
https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/mmpc/2017/05/12/wannacrypt-ransomware-worm-targets-out-of-date-systems/

From what I understand that means it can infect unpatched systems on other networks which have TCP port 445 open.


gzt

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  Reply # 1782672 15-May-2017 16:12
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One thing I'm not clear on yet. If the first machine is already patched when the ware runs on it, can it still infect unpatched machines?

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  Reply # 1782674 15-May-2017 16:14
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gzt: One thing I'm not clear on yet. If the first machine is already patched when the ware runs on it, can it still infect unpatched machines?


Yes it can. I've tested this with a sample in a lab environment.




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  Reply # 1782683 15-May-2017 16:44
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Are there likely to be many machines, even older ones, that are both unpatched and have port 445 open? The initial attack vector seems to have been an executable in an email attachment masquerading as a zip file by using a double extension. This is straight out of hacking 101 from the 1990s. It doesn't seem very sophisticated to me. On the other hand, it has obviously been pretty effective.

 

 





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  Reply # 1782703 15-May-2017 17:46
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Rikkitic:

 

Are there likely to be many machines, even older ones, that are both unpatched and have port 445 open? The initial attack vector seems to have been an executable in an email attachment masquerading as a zip file by using a double extension. This is straight out of hacking 101 from the 1990s. It doesn't seem very sophisticated to me. On the other hand, it has obviously been pretty effective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

any pc using a modem or them old adsl card that got put into pc when adsl first came out.

 

 

 

edit: and maybe a  USB tethered phone using direct apn 

 

 

 

edit 2 : ipv6 setup by someone not knowing what they are doing


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  Reply # 1783058 16-May-2017 12:39
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Rikkitic:

 

 I just tried the link again and it works fine. It also worked several times earlier today. It takes you to a page where you can choose a patch for your specific OS version. You can choose to patch only the vulnerability, or do a roll-up for the month.

 

 

 

 

There is no patch for my version of Windows 10 (1703). 

 

Was it included in Insider Preview 15063?





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  Reply # 1783072 16-May-2017 12:42
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I'm quite sure I don't want to drive a smart car or live in a smart house or fly in a smart plane.

 

That way I won't be at risk of being held ransom in my car, house or halfway into the stratosphere, just because someone, somewhere, forgot to apply/didn't make a patch every 2 days.


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  Reply # 1783074 16-May-2017 12:43
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Does Win 10 require patching? I thought it wasn't vulnerable.

 

 





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  Reply # 1783077 16-May-2017 12:49
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joker97:

 

I'm quite sure I don't want to drive a smart car or live in a smart house or fly in a smart plane.

 

That way I won't be at risk of being held ransom in my car, house or halfway into the stratosphere, just because someone, somewhere, forgot to apply/didn't make a patch every 2 days.

 

 

In an unsmart car you can always have a heart attack and wipe out a dozen smart car passengers. Your unsmart house may burn down around you while you are sleeping. There are no more unsmart planes. The pilots are just there for ballast.

 

 





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  Reply # 1783078 16-May-2017 12:49
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Rikkitic:

 

Does Win 10 require patching? I thought it wasn't vulnerable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you a up to date you have been patched, you are however still vulnerable 





Mike
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  Reply # 1783081 16-May-2017 13:04
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joker97:

 

I'm quite sure I don't want to drive a smart car or live in a smart house or fly in a smart plane.

 

That way I won't be at risk of being held ransom in my car, house or halfway into the stratosphere, just because someone, somewhere, forgot to apply/didn't make a patch every 2 days.

 

 

You're still liable to die from some other programmer's (i.e. excluding security) mistake in most cars and planes. Or some mistake by a mechanical or aerodynamics or whatever designer.

 

 


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