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  Reply # 1958307 14-Feb-2018 20:23
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yes, my days of freebies are long gone. And server software is $$$.

 

So if I approach this from another angle, I'm after a solution that will allow me to (1) easily restore individual files from a number of historical restore points, and (2) restore an entire system in the event of a client hardware failure.

 

WHS does (1) exactly to my needs. I've looked into Win10 File History, and I think that will take care of (1), saving files to a NAS (which I already have).

 

WHS does system backups of Win10 clients, but I admit I don't know if it can restore them, never had to go there. The trouble with a new software solution for (2) is that I have 6 clients, and that starts to add up money wise.

 

 

 

 

 

 





Life is too short to remove USB safely.


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  Reply # 1958358 14-Feb-2018 22:49
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kiwifidget: ...(2) restore an entire system in the event of a client hardware failure.

 

... The trouble with a new software solution for (2) is that I have 6 clients, and that starts to add up money wise. 

 

I've heard very good things about the FOG project. SpecOps might be an option and then there always is this from alternativeto.net


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  Reply # 1958399 15-Feb-2018 08:03
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Proxmox + openmediavault would get my vote. Would need hardware that supports VT-d though which isn’t a given.

Personally run two servers, one for compute and one for storage.


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  Reply # 1958412 15-Feb-2018 08:22
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I run Proxmox for all my virtual servers and have found it pretty good (but have very limited experience - i.e. none - in any others to compare against!). I also run FreeNAS on a separate box for storage. One of the best things I did was invest some time in setting up Icinga2 for monitoring everything. That makes life so much easier keeping track of everything, with alerts when resource limits get hit and things go down. A decent monitoring setup is vital once you get past a couple of servers (virtual or not).


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  Reply # 1972753 11-Mar-2018 17:57
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Synology: completely overpriced when it comes to real stuff with ECC. VM + Cam licensing sucks

 

HPe Microserver: H/W Gen8 ok, Gen10 sucks, paid service plan sucks (for users who only need BIOS updates l8r on)

 

Openmediavault w/Docker plugin + own well balanced server setup ... and the door opens widely ... wink





Nope, English isn't my mother tongue. But that's why I'm here. smile


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  Reply # 1973170 12-Mar-2018 13:15
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Synology is very overpriced, you're effectively paying for the hardware and software combo.  VM licensing isn't an issue as its only virtual DSM which costs, normal VMs (windows, linux etc.) are free apart from the actual VM OS.  I use xpenology to boot in to DSM 6.1; a hack yes but effectively you can use cheaper hardware in custom cases.


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