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219 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 343509 20-Jun-2010 19:08
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Correct, all the i7 chips that start with a 9 will fit the P6TD or any LGA1366 board. If you're going that way the 930 is the replacement for the 920 for the same price so you may as well go for that one. The xenons are meant for servers. Your 600w psu would handle that easily assuming the rest of your computer isn't too insane.

If you're looking to spend that much on your new computer why don't you tell us what you'd like to use it for and a budget and we could recommend some parts that would be suitable. The i7 range whilst awesome may be overkill for your needs.




Desktop: i7 920, GTX 275, asus P6T, antec 1200, 6gb ram, 1tb spinpoint f1, 1tb spinpoint f3, Logitech Z2300, Zero DAC, Shure SRH440
Laptop: Toshiba satellite, T5300, Go 7300
Home Theatre: 32" loewe CRT, Harmon kardon amp, dvd player, image 418 speakers, rega planar 25 turntable :)



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 343556 20-Jun-2010 22:11
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Hi Samwooff

I would totally agree that what I'm thinking of getting would be an overkill, as I'm not personally needing one this powerful, but I have two teenage kids in the house, both who are very smart - one wants to be an engineer, and the other wanting to be an architect, so i felt that a powerful computer would be a great thing to step up into - especially since the old one was positively archaic (but really, really good). We may all learn a thing or two from this experience. Not too worried about things budget wise, just as long as I can afford to do it mainly. Maybe $2K or a little more?

219 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 343582 20-Jun-2010 23:51
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Hahaha fair enough.
Well in that case an i7 or similar is not a bad idea, I'm currently in engineering at auckland uni and I use my i7 computer quite a bit for computer simulations, CAD and various other programs it makes the difference between an analysis taking a day or a couple of hours so money well spent.

I'm going to assume you're using the old case, DVD and power supply from the old computer.
For 2k I'd be looking at a build based around an i5 -750, the i7s only advantage is hyperthreading which I've never really seen make a huge difference in anything I've done.
This is roughly what I'd suggest for an awesome computer

i5-750-$335
Asus P7P55D-E-$269
2x2GB Kingston Hyper X DDR3 ram -$229
Samsung F3 1tb -$135
Ati 5770-$289
Case-already have
DVD-already have
PSU-already have

If theres anything I've missed like a new monitor or you want to replace those old components it's way below your budget without really losing any performance. Something like this would be great for games, office, engineering stuff and could be easily overclocked.




Desktop: i7 920, GTX 275, asus P6T, antec 1200, 6gb ram, 1tb spinpoint f1, 1tb spinpoint f3, Logitech Z2300, Zero DAC, Shure SRH440
Laptop: Toshiba satellite, T5300, Go 7300
Home Theatre: 32" loewe CRT, Harmon kardon amp, dvd player, image 418 speakers, rega planar 25 turntable :)



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 343650 21-Jun-2010 09:38
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Good morning Samwooff

Thank you once again for that advice.

I'm beginning to see that for not a huge amount more cash than what I'd be spending on the shop to fit their chosen components into this old computer, I'm going to be getting a machine that I'll be able to 'play with'. This appeals immensly to me, not that I'm going to be doing that straight away. Win& - how cheaply does that come?

I  was going to use a Seagate HDD, as the old comp has one, and I'm sure that my lappy does too. Is the Samsung unit a better one?

And will the new CPU come complete with a heatsink, and if I don't plan to overclock it, will it need extra fan cooling?

Thanks again
Peter

219 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 343717 21-Jun-2010 11:53
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Yeah at the moment there are some setups that are ridiculously good value, I think an i5 -750 happens to be the bargain of the century right now. Well overclocking is free if you do it yourself, thats half the fun of tinkering it's so much better when you know you just saved yourself some money by fiddling around.

The samsung f3 is meant to be one of the faster harddrives out there and was recommended by a few sources, the seagate equivalent will differ in performance only marginally mind you so you won't be worse off if you go for one.

The CPU comes with a "stock heatsink" probably pretty similar to what was on your old computer
http://www.more-shop.co.uk/images/i5handf.jpg
It's a pretty average heatsink but if you're staying at stock speeds it won't matter, once you start to overclock though this heatsink very quickly gets out of it's depth. An aftermarket heatsink can give you lower temperatures everywhere meaning a CPU likely to last longer and a lot more overclocking headroom and it also looks badass when you have something like this in the centre of your case
http://www.computerlounge.co.nz/components/componentview.asp?partid=9795

Speaking of cases, that might be the one part from your old build I'd suggest replacing too, most mass produced computer cases are a nightmare to work in and offer poor cooling but new one isn't free.




Desktop: i7 920, GTX 275, asus P6T, antec 1200, 6gb ram, 1tb spinpoint f1, 1tb spinpoint f3, Logitech Z2300, Zero DAC, Shure SRH440
Laptop: Toshiba satellite, T5300, Go 7300
Home Theatre: 32" loewe CRT, Harmon kardon amp, dvd player, image 418 speakers, rega planar 25 turntable :)



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 345041 24-Jun-2010 22:14
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Now to back-track many places. If I was to just get a new low spec ASUS P5G41TML-X motherboard with a E5400 CPU (as the computer shop guy was going to install in our old case for the interim period)(while I get components for a new build organised)), will the old hard drive with WIN2000 on it (IDE connectivity) just plug straight into the new board and run? - IE will the new motherboard and CPU 'support' WIN2000?.

And where's an economical place to get a copy of Win7? I believe that they come with 3 licences. Is this correct?

I'm now thinking that the old computer is really out of date with the hard drive and the optical drives all being IDE connected. I feel that for not a lot more $$, I may as well get renew everything, and (hopefully) end up with 2 good working computers at the end.

Sorry for all the stupid questions


Thanks once again
Peter

219 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 345051 24-Jun-2010 22:37
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There shouldn't be any problem with running the new CPU on windows 2000.
Here are the current prices for both OEM (one use only, if you change motherboard you gotta buy it again) http://pricespy.co.nz/product.php?p=485463
and retail (one license but you can transfer it) http://pricespy.co.nz/product.php?p=477914
There was a family pack with 3 licenses but it was a short lived offer unfortunately.




Desktop: i7 920, GTX 275, asus P6T, antec 1200, 6gb ram, 1tb spinpoint f1, 1tb spinpoint f3, Logitech Z2300, Zero DAC, Shure SRH440
Laptop: Toshiba satellite, T5300, Go 7300
Home Theatre: 32" loewe CRT, Harmon kardon amp, dvd player, image 418 speakers, rega planar 25 turntable :)



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 345053 24-Jun-2010 22:43
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Hi Samwooff

I couldn't for the life of me find anything on the net that indicated that I couldn't do that either, but I thought that I better ask in here. The kids are telling me that there's stuff (mainly music) although my daughter has some house designs) on the old hard drive that they'd like to keep.

Would you expect the above mentioned new motherboard to basically plug and play?. That (old) hard drive had Windows 2000 loaded onto it from an IT guy who built up that computer but, unfortunately, he's unable to help me now. (I assume he had a OEM licence), but I don't have the disc to reload it. I did try connecting the hard drive into a Windows 98 computer, but it didn't work. I'd be assuming that the drive and it's contents are still OK.


I'll have a look at those sites re new licences either tomorrow or over the weekend. The computer shop guy was wanting me to buy a 3 user licence for $200, but I think I cn see that it's possibly old stock.


Thanks again
Peter

219 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 345065 25-Jun-2010 00:08
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You can still access all your old stuff if you get a new machine as well, either through an external enclosure or just putting it in the case and plugging it in.

The motherboard should come with all the relevant drivers you need but it should be virtually plug and play with things like hard drives.

If it's for windows 7 home premium or better that sounds like a good deal considering the other prices I've seen.

On the asus website that motherboard only comes with drivers for xp and newer so some things might not work with 2000 but I couldn't say for certain sorry.




Desktop: i7 920, GTX 275, asus P6T, antec 1200, 6gb ram, 1tb spinpoint f1, 1tb spinpoint f3, Logitech Z2300, Zero DAC, Shure SRH440
Laptop: Toshiba satellite, T5300, Go 7300
Home Theatre: 32" loewe CRT, Harmon kardon amp, dvd player, image 418 speakers, rega planar 25 turntable :)



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 345121 25-Jun-2010 09:44
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Hi Samwooff, I hope that you're having a great day.

It sounds like that if I want to get our old machine running, I need to get a new motherboard, CPU, a new hard drive, and a Win7 disc?

Peter

464 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 94


  Reply # 345134 25-Jun-2010 10:27
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Yep.

Whether you decide to choose the CPU the Tech suggested, or get a higher powered CPU & mobo like the 920/930, you're basically going to end up with the same system design (that is, new OS installed onto a new drive, with your old drive added to the system as a second disk). The only difference will be your level of performance.

The main thing to check if you're going for an i7 is that the Motherboard still has an 'IDE' connection (for your old drive). Most do, but some don't, so it's pretty important just to double check it.

I'm pretty fond of the core i* range, having a 920 myself. The performance for a given price and electricity usage (in my opinion) is above and beyond previous generations of CPU.

You may find that you get a better price point if you go for a dual core 1156 socket CPU (I'm thinking i3s & i5s, or potentially, quad-core from the i7 8** series (which uses the more mainstream 1156 socket).

A OEM win7 licence should set you back $150-170.



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 345151 25-Jun-2010 11:18
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Good morning Kiwi

Thanks for your comments

I had initially planned to upgrade our old comp using as much of the old hardware as I could, but by doing research into motherboards, and what's already in the old box (as in both optical drives are IDE as is the hard drive, I felt that I might have been flogging a dead horse here, so I changed tack. I have two teenagers here, and I could see that we might have a few occaisions where they would 'scrap' as to who got to use the computer (it happens now anyhow), so I thought as an interim measure, with a minimum spend, I could get the old machine up and running again, while I built up the new one. The motherboards all seem to have only one IDE socket now (as all up-to-date drives appear to be Sata connected).

Can I get a 3 or 4 way IDE cable, and connect all my old drives together to plug into a motherboard?. I  did note Samwoofs comments about getting an external 'box' to fit the old hard drive into.

Can I overwrite Win2000 on the old HDD, without losing other data on it?. And 32 bit or 64 bit?

Thanks
Peter

464 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 94


  Reply # 345155 25-Jun-2010 11:26
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You can't get a 3 or 4 way IDE cable as they only come with a master & slave on a single ribbon. If you want your two CD drives and HDD, you need to have more than one IDE port on your motherboard. I would be surprised if many of the new motherboards still contain more than one, because they are very much a legacy component now (the main reason I would suspect they're still on there is because of IDE CD/DVD drives).

As for installing win7, you should be able to install win7 over the top, although it wouldn't be the recommended method (which is generally a 'clean' install'). There isn't an assisted upgrade process from 200 -> 7 either, so you'll have to do it manually. Not actually that hard. Just make sure you have enough spare disk space for the job!

Personally I would go with 64bit, although it probably doesn't matter too much.

k1wi



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 345159 25-Jun-2010 11:27
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I meant to say that I greatly appreciate all the patience that you guys have with me and all my (stupid/dumb) questions. I'm not really computer savvy, but with the help and advice of you guys, I'm learning heaps. I apologise if I ask a question more than once too.

Keep up the great work

And thank you so very much
Peter 



43 posts

Geek


  Reply # 345167 25-Jun-2010 11:49
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This is turning out to be a very steep (but really interesting) learning curve for me.

Looks like the 'right' thing to do is: New motherboard, new CPU, new HDD, and at least one new SATA optical drive - and of course, new operating system. That would leave me with the motherboards IDE port to connect the old drive into
 
I think this would just about eventually amount to me building up two computers. I guess if the above 'proposal' works, it would certainly give me the confidence to build up the bigger unit as discussed earlier.

Peter

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