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6433 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 300125 18-Feb-2010 13:59
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it probably wouldn't stop me buying a game, but it might delay me buying it until any DRM issues are sorted out.

268 posts

Ultimate Geek


  Reply # 300310 19-Feb-2010 10:13
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http://games.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=10/02/18/0719256

Have fun with that DRM.

I was going to buy Assassin's Creed II for the PS3, but ubisoft annoyed me buy only supplying the full game in the 'black edition', which I was willing to pay for.  But it was restricted to one retailer.  I wasn't happy with that, so I took a stance and didn't buy it.  I thought I might consider waiting till it arrives on PC, maybe buy on Steam or something.

But now they are going to include this most obtrusive DRM, I won't buy it.  I won't play it.  Even though I really desire to do so, until this DRM is removed I won't.  So I take exception to comments like this:

xpd: If you want the game you wont care what the publisher does really.



 
 
 
 


225 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 300432 19-Feb-2010 15:45
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friedCrumpet: http://games.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=10/02/18/0719256

Have fun with that DRM.

I was going to buy Assassin's Creed II for the PS3, but ubisoft annoyed me buy only supplying the full game in the 'black edition', which I was willing to pay for.  But it was restricted to one retailer.  I wasn't happy with that, so I took a stance and didn't buy it.  I thought I might consider waiting till it arrives on PC, maybe buy on Steam or something.

But now they are going to include this most obtrusive DRM, I won't buy it.  I won't play it.  Even though I really desire to do so, until this DRM is removed I won't.  So I take exception to comments like this:

xpd: If you want the game you wont care what the publisher does really.





3 Small in-game quests shouldn't stop you from getting the regular edition, I highly doubt they'd have any effect on the story.



268 posts

Ultimate Geek


  Reply # 300462 19-Feb-2010 16:52
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JMatt94:

3 Small in-game quests shouldn't stop you from getting the regular edition, I highly doubt they'd have any effect on the story.




Well guess what, it did.  More to the point it was my inability to buy the full game from my retailer of choice that stopped me.

They have released the extras as DLC today, so I can pick it up now if I wanted to.  However I will probably now wait for a price drop or get it second hand.  If Ubisoft didn't screw around with the distribution at the beginning I would have paid full price.


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  Reply # 300492 20-Feb-2010 10:54
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Personally, I will no longer touch any Ubisoft PC game with a barge pole. That DRM is just heinous, and should be blasted well illegal (in fact it probably is - "hey, my game I paid for will not work without the internet... this isn't fit for purpose at all!)

That said, I don't intend to pirate them either.

And I agree with FriedCrumpet - retailer exclusive deals are starting to piss me off.




I finally have fibre!  Had to leave the country to get it though.


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  Reply # 300759 21-Feb-2010 17:56
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I won't touch anything with DRM after I had a bad experience with GTA IV.

I had to install
* Microsoft dot net
* Games for Windows live
* Rockstar social club
* SecuROM (horrid Sony DRM pig that tried to hook into my PC without even asking, spewing DLL files into %windir%/system32/)
(And it still wouldn't actually run)
* service pack 3 (even though reports show it works well with service pack 2.
* Online activation

And then it wouldn't run, my machine was fouled up and I had to re-image my entire system.

I don't mind paying my way but this is fast putting me right off. I have not bought a game since that nasty GTA IV junk and worked very hard to neuter my existing library as I'm getting tired of the re-installs, slow performance, Steam advertising and tracking and constant spinning of my DVD drive.

I played half-life last night for the first time without steam and it was an incredible experience. Very quick and smooth.

Go Hawks!
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  Reply # 300834 21-Feb-2010 21:17
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paradoxsm: I won't touch anything with DRM after I had a bad experience with GTA IV.

I had to install
* Microsoft dot net
* Games for Windows live
* Rockstar social club
* SecuROM (horrid Sony DRM pig that tried to hook into my PC without even asking, spewing DLL files into %windir%/system32/)
(And it still wouldn't actually run)
* service pack 3 (even though reports show it works well with service pack 2.
* Online activation

And then it wouldn't run, my machine was fouled up and I had to re-image my entire system.

I don't mind paying my way but this is fast putting me right off. I have not bought a game since that nasty GTA IV junk and worked very hard to neuter my existing library as I'm getting tired of the re-installs, slow performance, Steam advertising and tracking and constant spinning of my DVD drive.

I played half-life last night for the first time without steam and it was an incredible experience. Very quick and smooth.



This is the reasoning that in the foreseeable future, I will be retaining my gaming to my console and not bother with building / buying a gaming rig...


Sorry - I know that the gaming experience can be vastly superior on a dedicated gaming PC, but if I cannot just put the disk in and the damn thing works, then I'm going to loose patience very quickly.

6433 posts

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  Reply # 300858 21-Feb-2010 23:01
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wazzageek:
paradoxsm: I won't touch anything with DRM after I had a bad experience with GTA IV.

I had to install
* Microsoft dot net
* Games for Windows live
* Rockstar social club
* SecuROM (horrid Sony DRM pig that tried to hook into my PC without even asking, spewing DLL files into %windir%/system32/)
(And it still wouldn't actually run)
* service pack 3 (even though reports show it works well with service pack 2.
* Online activation

And then it wouldn't run, my machine was fouled up and I had to re-image my entire system.

I don't mind paying my way but this is fast putting me right off. I have not bought a game since that nasty GTA IV junk and worked very hard to neuter my existing library as I'm getting tired of the re-installs, slow performance, Steam advertising and tracking and constant spinning of my DVD drive.

I played half-life last night for the first time without steam and it was an incredible experience. Very quick and smooth.



This is the reasoning that in the foreseeable future, I will be retaining my gaming to my console and not bother with building / buying a gaming rig...


Sorry - I know that the gaming experience can be vastly superior on a dedicated gaming PC, but if I cannot just put the disk in and the damn thing works, then I'm going to loose patience very quickly.


sadly consoles seem to be headed that way now too.

not so much the configuringof your system (although if the console/game doens't like your router then you might have a lot of fiddling to do)  but rather the endless patches that seem to have amterialised ever since net connections for consoles bvecame common. i had to download a 500MB patch for motostorm befor eit would play.  It took over 24 hours on bigtime.

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  Reply # 300873 22-Feb-2010 00:05
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And the reason why many of us are heading back to our roots (classic 8-bit gaming) retro-remakes, Dosbox or squeezing every last bit out of more recent (late 90's-early 00's) titles before the days of this the DRM frenzy.

Same rule that applies to music, you may not be able to play it on a machine in two years time in case that server goes down.

xpd

The Overrated Raccoons
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  Reply # 301016 22-Feb-2010 14:55
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XPD / Gavin / DemiseNZ

 

For Free Games, Geekiness and Reviews, visit :

 

Home Of The Overrated Raccoons

 

 


xpd

The Overrated Raccoons
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  Reply # 301022 22-Feb-2010 15:04
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paradoxsm: And the reason why many of us are heading back to our roots (classic 8-bit gaming) retro-remakes, Dosbox or squeezing every last bit out of more recent (late 90's-early 00's) titles before the days of this the DRM frenzy.

Same rule that applies to music, you may not be able to play it on a machine in two years time in case that server goes down.


+1

Ive been playing a lot of old games lately.... few reasons

1) Cant afford new ones
2) They wont run that great anyway
3) Theyre boring

So out comes MAME, WinUAE and lots of ROMs/ADFs :D




XPD / Gavin / DemiseNZ

 

For Free Games, Geekiness and Reviews, visit :

 

Home Of The Overrated Raccoons

 

 


k14

573 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 301052 22-Feb-2010 16:42
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First game I tried to play in about 3-4 years was Dirt 2. Installed it sweet but for some reason or another I couldn't get the account to login to codemasters servers to work properly. Without the account you couldn't save the game progress. This along with all the crap and movies it plays in between tracks meaning you only get about 50% gaming time and 50% thumb twiddling time meant I played it twice and haven't tried again since. I'll take my xbox any day.

Go Hawks!
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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 301460 23-Feb-2010 13:07
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NonprayingMantis:sadly consoles seem to be headed that way now too.

not so much the configuringof your system (although if the console/game doens't like your router then you might have a lot of fiddling to do)  but rather the endless patches that seem to have amterialised ever since net connections for consoles bvecame common. i had to download a 500MB patch for motostorm befor eit would play.  It took over 24 hours on bigtime.



Thats not so much DRM - and *could* be construed as a good thing - i.e. bugs getting patched (although I don't know how many bugs truly get fixed in that fashion).


I'm still very much a solo player (I only play multiplayer on LAN's - and I don't do that much anymore) 


So, in my circumstance, I can ignore the patch (it will disconnect you from XBox live) but so far I haven't seen anything to stop you playing the game.

124 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 301534 23-Feb-2010 15:32
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I was going to buy Assassins Creed 2, but then I saw the heinous DRM on it.
I'm never buying a Ubisoft game that contains that DRM, period.

I like the good old days of simple CD keys that wouldn't let you go online if someone was already using it, maybe its not feasable to go back to that, but Ubisoft definitely doesn't have the right answer.



709 posts

Ultimate Geek


  Reply # 301737 24-Feb-2010 08:56
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I'm sure alot of you will agree to this. As for me im too addicted to the Silent hunter series that they could throw in a anti piracy made from black war*z under-ground hackers based somewhere in Russia and I still would buy the game! lol.

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/hated-and-broken-article

Published as part of our sister-site GamesIndustry.biz' widely-read weekly newsletter, the GamesIndustry.biz Editorial is a weekly dissection of one of the issues weighing on the minds of the people at the top of the games business. It appears on Eurogamer after it goes out to GI.biz newsletter subscribers.

John Riccitiello hates DRM. That's the rather surprising news from the Electronic Arts CEO this week - surprising not because there's anything particularly likeable about DRM, but because of his own firm's immense attachment to the widely disliked (and utterly useless) technology.

Admittedly, Riccitiello's comments go a lot deeper than that convenient headline. Despite the fact that he "hates" DRM, he goes on to attempt to justify it - comparing it with locks on your door or other necessary evils which we all require for security.

The comparison is utterly flawed. Locks and keys are indeed a trade-off which we make between convenience and security, but they are designed to protect our own security - not that of the company that sold us the door. There is a real, tangible advantage to the person being inconvenienced. That doesn't exist with DRM.

In fact, DRM is even worse. Not only is there no advantage to the end-user - in exchange for what can be pretty shocking inconvenience, which even Riccitiello confesses is "cumbersome". There's also no real advantage to the company responsible for inflicting this inconvenience, because contrary to Riccitiello's assertion, the DRM solutions used by the industry at large don't actually provide any meaningful protection from piracy.

The proof? Well, you can take the various charts and graphs presented by the companies trying to sell you DRM with which to lock up your products - almost none of whom even claim to be able to protect you past the first few days on sale, and frankly, even those claims are rather spurious. On the other side of the balance, you can put the fact that the Bittorrent "swarms" for Spore, EA's most recent and most controversial DRM-locked product, were among the biggest ever seen for a new videogame.

This alone makes another of Riccitiello's assertions look a little peculiar. He reckons that of those who kicked up a storm about Spore's DRM - which spilled from negative Amazon reviews into the specialist press, and even into the mainstream media in a small way - "about half" were pirates.

Why, exactly, would pirates care about Spore's DRM? If your intention was to pirate the game, there was a perfectly functional copy, totally unencumbered by DRM, sitting up there for you on Bittorrent - for free - on the day of launch. No pirate, with the possible exception of the person who originally uploaded the game to the Internet, ever saw Spore's DRM.

This is the essential, deeply uncomfortable truth about DRM which I and many, many other commentators have been banging on about for years. No pirate on the planet gives a damn about it, because they're happily using an unencumbered copy. The only people who ever see DRM - the only people who ever suffer the "cumbersome" inconvenience of these deeply flawed technologies - are your legitimate, paying, long-suffering customers.

Of course, it's not like the videogames industry stands alone in making this mistake. The film industry has spent years putting unskippable ads on the front of its DVDs, forcing legitimate, paying customers to endure lengthy, over-wrought messages about the evils of piracy. Had they downloaded the film from the Internet or picked up a pirate DVD, of course, they wouldn't have to put up with such nonsense. The irony is harsh, and continues to fly completely over the heads of whatever clueless individuals demand the inclusion of these ridiculous ads.

The music business, too, has made a similar error. You may recall that Sony and other companies spent ages experimenting with ways to prevent CDs from being copied onto computers - completely ignoring the fact that most people had upgraded their portable CD players to MP3 players. Those who legitimately bought music were being punished. Those who downloaded it from Napster (as then was) or other file-sharing services experienced no such restrictions.




Worst Response To A Crisis:
From a readers' Q and A column in TV GUIDE: "If we get involved in a nuclear war, would the electromagnetic pulses from exploding bombs damage my videotapes?"



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