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Topic # 123150 26-Jun-2013 12:32
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Hiya, I have just been testing my speeds out copying a single video file (1.1GB) from one computer to the next.  They both support 1Gbps and so is the switch.  I unhooked the internet router cable downstairs.  I used a Linux Netbook plugged to the switch to act as the DHCP b/c the router downstairs in the lounge was  connected by a long cable with a inline coupler (indoor Cat6 and outdoor Cat6) to go between the floors. 

In the same bedroom, 2 ports.  B1a and B1b.  3m cable length to the switch behind the bedroom wall to the hallway's cupboard.  Averaging at least 100-110MB/sec. 

If I then use B1a and B2a (so different bedroom).  So a 3m cable and B2a is maybe 10m cable (up into the ceiling space and then down the wardrobe and thru the wall to a wallplate).  I get maybe 95MB/sec. 

However now I wanted to test the long cable to the tv room (lounge) with its inline coupler.  I took the cable off the internet router and into a laptop (1Gbps).  Copied the same file and got 50MB/sec.  This cable length is maybe 12m internal cat6 underneath the house, a joiner (inline coupler) then maybe another 12m of external cat6.  Does this 50MB/sec sound right to you?  


Many thanks.

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  Reply # 845543 26-Jun-2013 12:36
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Possibly crosstalk issues in the joiner. Is it a hardwired joiner or just plug together? If it is hardwired are the twists maintained right up to the IDCs?



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  Reply # 845545 26-Jun-2013 12:41
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It's a Dynamix Punch-down unit.

Edit - we used a cable tester from the RJ45 at the network switch end right down to the wallplate (after the coupler) and the pins were fine #1-8.  We used 568B wiring pattern. 

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Technical Solutions Aust

  Reply # 845567 26-Jun-2013 13:18
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rayonline: It's a Dynamix Punch-down unit.

Edit - we used a cable tester from the RJ45 at the network switch end right down to the wallplate (after the coupler) and the pins were fine #1-8.  We used 568B wiring pattern. 


If you aren't doing the test using something like a DTX-1800 set to a CAT6 profile, you aren't testing for things like NEXT etc etc.

A cable tester just tells you if there is continuity on pins.



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  Reply # 845608 26-Jun-2013 14:26
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ok that tool is a bit expensive for a one off diy job for the common household. in this context what would your advice be, strip back wire and rejoin it?

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  Reply # 845610 26-Jun-2013 14:30
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Why isn't it a single run of cable?



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  Reply # 845616 26-Jun-2013 14:52
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i had spare internal cat6 that would go waste, i had to buy external cat6 per the metre given their huge rolls i prob still have 30m of cable here without a need. internal that is

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Ultimate Geek
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Technical Solutions Aust

  Reply # 845634 26-Jun-2013 15:33
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rayonline: ok that tool is a bit expensive for a one off diy job for the common household. in this context what would your advice be, strip back wire and rejoin it?



Yeh they are pretty spendy. Wasn't suggesting you buy one, but I was trying to shed light on how to test properly.

Honestly if you think the joint is the problem (and it most likely is) then you need a single continuous run of cable, installed with love and care, and terminated into Cat6 rated jacks with the finesse of a ballet dancer, and the skills of a ninja.

But seriously, Cat6 performing at its best boils down to 2 things:

1)Quality cable installed in a quality manner (away from power, don't tug on it during installation, no bends or kinks etc etc)

2)Quality termination into a quality jack. (Cat6 jack, minimal stripping, minimal reduction in twist, extreme care in punching down, and with a quality punch down tool)


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  Reply # 845636 26-Jun-2013 15:37
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I am not a cabler, but I have talked to some about Cat6 and I think the previous post sums it up.  It's good for expert installation.  If you DIY, then don't expect the best results.  You would possibly be better off with good Cat5e as it's a lot more forgiving (and should support GbE no problem on a 30m run).

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Technical Solutions Aust

  Reply # 846014 27-Jun-2013 11:24
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ubergeeknz: I am not a cabler, but I have talked to some about Cat6 and I think the previous post sums it up.  It's good for expert installation.  If you DIY, then don't expect the best results.  You would possibly be better off with good Cat5e as it's a lot more forgiving (and should support GbE no problem on a 30m run).


Not entirely the case. Apples for apples installations, Cat6 will give you a better result than Cat5. This is owing to the fact that a Cat6 cable's construction is superior to Cat5.

You are better of shooting for Cat6 and failing, than shooting for Cat5 and failing.

The cat6 specification is harder to achieve than the Cat5 specification. This doesn't however mean that Cat5  cabling itself is easier to install.



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