Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




41 posts

Geek


Topic # 148703 28-Jun-2014 09:55
Send private message

Friends are planning to build a new home. These people aren't geeks by any means though I can certainly imagine them appreciating fast internet, video on demand, and whatever else is around the corner for the average person. 

My first thought was to encourage them to install structured cabling for future-proofing. I'd help them out with sourcing components at a sensible price and doing the terminations, so the main labour cost would just be in getting a sparkie to run the cables. So I was about to refer them to the TCF home page.

But I'm also well aware that probably the majority of Kiwi households are getting by with wireless solutions, which are progressively getting faster.

Does anyone think that a modest investment in structured cabling is a waste of money?

Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
4471 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1288


  Reply # 1075910 28-Jun-2014 10:01
5 people support this post
Send private message

Go with the cabling. It will provide far more flexibility in the future. Wireless is a complimentary technology for a cabled network, and in some areas is becoming far less useful due to the high number of nearby networks and interference.


3378 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 386

Trusted

  Reply # 1075918 28-Jun-2014 10:41
Send private message

It would be silly not to do it during a new build. Wireless is not a replacement for structured cabling. Those cables could be used for all kinds of things, not just plugging in computers etc. e.g. infrared controllers, HDMI distribution, low powered devices and all kinds of future devices.





 
 
 
 


Talk DIrtY to me
4026 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2072

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1075924 28-Jun-2014 10:45
Send private message

Do it while the walls are open. They'll regret it if they have to retro-fit it at a later stage.

I still can't understand why my early 1950's house never had a wired network installed. They were obviously being cheap skates. tongue-out




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


3095 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 510

Trusted

  Reply # 1076575 29-Jun-2014 15:42
Send private message

Wireless is good
But to a point.
Like when you have fibre to the home. Today you will not often see the full speed of that fibre down the other end of your house - because wireless through one or two walls is slower than the incoming fibre.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




2298 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 939


  Reply # 1076595 29-Jun-2014 16:46
Send private message

Cable it, much better than wireless for many applications - especially real-time video streaming at decent resolutions.

Consider at running conduit (with fishing line inside it) with face plates at the end for maximum future proofing. Then if specs change in ten years or so, it's comparatively easy to just pull the new cable through and change the face plate as needed.



41 posts

Geek


  Reply # 1076615 29-Jun-2014 17:21
Send private message

+5 for cabling so far. Thanks all for your insights. Certainly I greatly prefer wired myself but didn't want to go imposing my own prejudices on my friends.

One recent news item that had me questioning my own instincts a bit was the new Jasmax-designed $50M premises for Vodafone in ChCh. The report I saw claimed that the building would be wireless, which I thought pretty radical. Whether that report was accurate is another matter, of course.

Talk DIrtY to me
4026 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2072

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1076617 29-Jun-2014 17:24
Send private message

You know those steel framed houses they're plugging on TV? They're really unsuitable for wireless networks. Another thing in favour of wired.




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


17515 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2122

Trusted

  Reply # 1076632 29-Jun-2014 18:30
Send private message

What cables would one put? Thanks

20430 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3901

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1076639 29-Jun-2014 18:47
Send private message

merlinz: +5 for cabling so far. Thanks all for your insights. Certainly I greatly prefer wired myself but didn't want to go imposing my own prejudices on my friends.

One recent news item that had me questioning my own instincts a bit was the new Jasmax-designed $50M premises for Vodafone in ChCh. The report I saw claimed that the building would be wireless, which I thought pretty radical. Whether that report was accurate is another matter, of course.


Add enterprise grade wifi gear to your house at a cost probably more than that of the needed cabling and you can be largely wireless too. So long as all your devices are current model ones that will do 80MHz 5GHz 802.11ac or higher.

Put a single free router in a bad location and you wont even have any coverage at the other side of the house, and the devices hanging on at low bitrates will drag the whole network performance down as they hog the channel at 12 megabits wifi rate trying to push a 8 megabit stream across the house.

Spend a few grand on the cables now, or spend many times that in the future when UFB tv finally makes it to your place and you want to watch it in more than one location etc.




Richard rich.ms

20430 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3901

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1076641 29-Jun-2014 18:51
Send private message

joker97: What cables would one put? Thanks


I did 2 cat5e to most power point locations upstairs, being that one room was at one stage used for gaming that cam in very handy when there were several PC's in there.

That is overkill really. I would run 2 at least to each TV location, more if you plan on reticulating HDMI around the house, one to each side of the bed to allow for a phone or something, one to the center of the living area, the hall way, and any other areas that you might want to put a mounted wifi AP for your phones and tablets etc.

Several runs to any study area since you may have one desktop or laptop for each kid and printers etc.

Wired will always be better than wireless for gaming etc, so consider more runs to TVs where there may be games consoles. Its a bit hackey to go putting switches everywhere, all consoles except the wiiU have ethernet, and there is an adapter for that to have ethernet.




Richard rich.ms

1292 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 319


  Reply # 1076654 29-Jun-2014 19:30
Send private message

If you have an option to put in cabling do it!  
It was the swing point when I sold my house, buyers were deciding between my place and another place that does not have it ... as soon as they saw my place had LAN points in every room that clinched it in my favour :-)



142 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 13

Subscriber

  Reply # 1076718 29-Jun-2014 22:01
Send private message

I was going to start a new thread with a similar question and thought I'd try piggybacking onto this discussion instead - apology if that's not the done thing.

I'm having a new house built and the stock specification was for three phone jacks.

I said, no, CAT6 to every room, at which point the developer told me to sort it out with the sparky.

The challenge to me is, right now SWMBO and I wouldn't need any data/phone cabling at all.  The house is not going to be our primary residence, we're unlikely to want a landline phone and we haven't had a television receiver for twenty years.  But I'd like to future-proof it as far as possible.  There's also the possibility that we'll want to rent it out during the summer months.

I'd appreciate everyone's ideas and suggestions as well as criticism of my own.

I assume that with phones being able to be plugged into RJ45 jacks and with VoIP being the way of the future, plain old phone cabling would be a waste of time.

I was thinking of one Ethernet jackpoint in each bedroom (2), one on each of the two available walls in the main living area, perhaps one in the kitchen.  Anywhere else?  More than one jackpoint per location?  I know I need to identify a central point for network switchgear to be installed. 

Is it useful to get physically connected to the Chorus infrastructure even if we have no immediate plans for wired Internet or phone?  (We will likely want a security system)

What is "structured cabling" as one contributor above recommends?

The house is in a small development being aimed at the retirement set.  Would it be useful to have data cabling into bathrooms too in case some future emergency call system would need them?

TIA.




20430 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3901

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1076721 29-Jun-2014 22:07
Send private message

structured cabling is the name for cable that can be reconfigured thru a patch panel type thing, so you can patch the outlets to be a lan port or an analog phone port by using a cable at the other end in the cabinet to plug it into whatever gear you want.

Definatly get the chorus install done, if you go to sell it in the future that might stop someone wanting to buy it, if fiber is available, get that installed too.

one socket may not be enough, if you have smart tv's etc they are best on wired, as are games consoles and media players.




Richard rich.ms

448 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 72


  Reply # 1077167 30-Jun-2014 16:39
Send private message

4 to each bedroom 8-12 to the entertainment setup and a couple in the garage. Aslo id put a couple in the kitchen up high like behind the fridge or by the extractor fan for wifi access points where there is going to be a power plug.
I have rewired my house and its a prick of a job if the gib is on. In the bedrooms put 4 where the TV might go HDMI over cat takes 2 RJ-45 add a consle and the tv makes 4. Cat6 Cable is cheap enough these days and your sparky depending on if he's up the times will do it. Ive run into a fair few electricians that believe data cables are not there job and will refuse to touch it....  

805 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 204

Subscriber

  Reply # 1077194 30-Jun-2014 16:58
One person supports this post
Send private message

kiwigander: <snip>
I was thinking of one Ethernet jackpoint in each bedroom (2), one on each of the two available walls in the main living area, perhaps one in the kitchen.  Anywhere else?  More than one jackpoint per location?  I know I need to identify a central point for network switchgear to be installed. 
<snip>


Take a look at The New Zealand Telecommunications Forum recomendations for cableing for what should be them minimum cableing that should NOW be installed in new builds

http://www.tcf.org.nz/content/02b3940f-1b3b-4cc8-bfc6-28173756da29.html


Pass it on to the Developer so that others dont get left with substandard cableing

 1 | 2
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

UAV Traffic Management Trial launching today in New Zealand
Posted 12-Dec-2017 16:06


UFB connections pass 460,000
Posted 11-Dec-2017 11:26


The Warehouse Group to adopt IBM Cloud to support digital transformation
Posted 11-Dec-2017 11:22


Dimension Data peeks into digital business 2018
Posted 11-Dec-2017 10:55


2018 Cyber Security Predictions
Posted 7-Dec-2017 14:55


Global Govtech Accelerator to drive public sector innovation in Wellington
Posted 7-Dec-2017 11:21


Stuff Pix media strategy a new direction
Posted 7-Dec-2017 09:37


Digital transformation is dead
Posted 7-Dec-2017 09:31


Fake news and cyber security
Posted 7-Dec-2017 09:27


Dimension Data New Zealand strengthens cybersecurity practice
Posted 5-Dec-2017 20:27


Epson NZ launches new Expression Premium Photo range
Posted 5-Dec-2017 20:26


Eventbrite and Twickets launch integration partnership in Australia and New Zealand
Posted 5-Dec-2017 20:23


New Fujifilm macro lens lands in New Zealand
Posted 5-Dec-2017 20:16


Cyber security not being taken seriously enough
Posted 5-Dec-2017 20:13


Sony commences Android 8.0 Oreo rollout in New Zealand
Posted 5-Dec-2017 20:08



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.