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  Reply # 1130460 17-Sep-2014 09:39
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hashbrown: If this is for desktops I suggest a USB extension cable and blu-tacking the adaptor high on the wall as a cheap way to improve reception. If that works then an extender in those locations should give your mobile devices better coverage too. I'd avoid the wall wart units and get something with diverse antennas that can be wall mounted. Some have Ethernet ports so they can do dual duty, supply the desktop via Ethernet and acting as an extender for mobile devices. READ THE MANUAL BEFORE BUYING and ask some questions here if your unsure about that path.

 

 

When the RBI was first installed, I bought a couple of usb adapters for the desktops and did a lot of experimenting with placing them in different locations on an extension cable and also trying a variety of parabolic reflectors to focus the signal. The parabolic reflectors definitely help but they don’t seem to help quite enough and any point I can reach with the usb cable doesn’t seem to make much difference either. Ultimately, all attempts to improve the signal failed to achieve the result I needed and after many days of trying different things and building different reflectors I gave up in frustration. That is when I started looking at powerline adapters and wi-fi extenders. So far the whole experience has been pretty discouraging. The only good connection I have is an Ethernet cable running outside up to the router. Unfortunately, this is just not a practical option for the whole house. I have multiple computers in my room and I can’t run separate cables to each of them and I don’t want to have to keep unplugging and plugging the one I do have. We also need connectivity at the other end of the house for the laptops. I’m racking my brain to work out the least awful solution but so far I don’t really know how to fix this. Hence my questions (and gratitude for the attempts to help).

 

 





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  Reply # 1130470 17-Sep-2014 09:58
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Rikkitic: I have multiple computers in my room and I can’t run separate cables to each of them and I don’t want to have to keep unplugging and plugging the one I do have. 


Sorry if I sound like I'm teaching you to suck eggs again, but if I understand you correctly, a cheap switch in your room would solve that particular problem.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1130490 17-Sep-2014 10:25
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Rikkitic:  That is when I started looking at powerline adapters and wi-fi extenders. So far the whole experience has been pretty discouraging.


Did the powerline adaptors not work ??
With some brands You can also buy extra 'remote' powerline adaptors so you could have many throughout the house (check for that before you buy)
The Netcomm 'kit' has a built in wifi AP & 2 ethernet plugs at the remote end.
Other brands have a built in 4 port network switch at the remote end
I usually put in a powerline kit & use its built in wifi AP and the remote end

On some sites wifi is just never reliable. Thats rare but sometimes its just the way it is & cant be fixed.
Thats why some homes/sites have great wifi throughout the house & even across 3 stories or a foil lined garage. Allways a surprise . Other homes its unusable even 2 rooms down the hall.
There may be other devices using 2.4Ghz in your house(or the neighbours) knocking out the wifi. Trying different wifi channels occasionally solves issues.


4 ports no wifi
http://www.netcommwireless.com/product/powerline/np203

wifi and 2 network ports
http://www.netcommwireless.com/product/powerline/np508

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  Reply # 1130500 17-Sep-2014 10:45
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This doc from Raytaylor is a good guide to help you understand the various options

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9U9Djx0lcSIbE1JMnBFcGhpTzg




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  Reply # 1130526 17-Sep-2014 11:30
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hashbrown:
Rikkitic: I have multiple computers in my room and I can’t run separate cables to each of them and I don’t want to have to keep unplugging and plugging the one I do have. 


Sorry if I sound like I'm teaching you to suck eggs again, but if I understand you correctly, a cheap switch in your room would solve that particular problem.

 

Hey I'm a beginner here. I'm just grateful people are prepared to try to help. Is there a cheap LAN switch that would do this? I didn't really realise that was a possibility.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 




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  Reply # 1130532 17-Sep-2014 11:37
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1101:
Rikkitic:  That is when I started looking at powerline adapters and wi-fi extenders. So far the whole experience has been pretty discouraging.


Did the powerline adaptors not work ??

 

I tried one powerline brand that seemed ok but I couldn't get it to work. No real documentation and no real controls either. Just plug in and wait for the leds to come on. Only once, after a day of repeated trying, did the network led stay on and then it worked brilliantly from one end of the house to the other. A few hours later the network led went out and never came on again, except briefly when the unit was replugged. I finally sent it back for a refund but now I don't have a whole lot of confidence in them.

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1130550 17-Sep-2014 11:43
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Rikkitic:
hashbrown:
Rikkitic: I have multiple computers in my room and I can’t run separate cables to each of them and I don’t want to have to keep unplugging and plugging the one I do have. 


Sorry if I sound like I'm teaching you to suck eggs again, but if I understand you correctly, a cheap switch in your room would solve that particular problem.
Hey I'm a beginner here. I'm just grateful people are prepared to try to help. Is there a cheap LAN switch that would do this? I didn't really realise that was a possibility.


The cable from the router into something like this
http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=SWHTPL1008&name=TP-LINK-TL-SF1008D-8-Port-10100Mbps-Desktop-Fast-E , and then cables from there to the various computers.



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  Reply # 1130553 17-Sep-2014 11:47
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I just ran some tests with my laptop. I don’t have any special equipment for checking signal strength but the Windows meter gives a reasonable relative indication. What I notice is that the signal drops off very rapidly as I move away from the router. Even a couple of meters loses a bar of signal. About 4 meters away through a closed door on the same floor the signal drops from five to two bars. One of the many things I don’t know is what kind of performance I should expect. Is this normal that the signal is so weak? How far should a normal router carry?

 

 





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  Reply # 1130567 17-Sep-2014 11:56
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jonb:
Rikkitic:
hashbrown:
Rikkitic: I have multiple computers in my room and I can’t run separate cables to each of them and I don’t want to have to keep unplugging and plugging the one I do have. 


Sorry if I sound like I'm teaching you to suck eggs again, but if I understand you correctly, a cheap switch in your room would solve that particular problem.
Hey I'm a beginner here. I'm just grateful people are prepared to try to help. Is there a cheap LAN switch that would do this? I didn't really realise that was a possibility.


The cable from the router into something like this
http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=SWHTPL1008&name=TP-LINK-TL-SF1008D-8-Port-10100Mbps-Desktop-Fast-E , and then cables from there to the various computers.

 

That looks really good. It would solve at least half my problem. I will give it a try.

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1130588 17-Sep-2014 12:16
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Even a couple of meters loses a bar of signal. .....How far should a normal router carry?



line of site wifi can go much further than the length of your house . Walls and doors attenuate the signal. Interference can knock it off completely.
I cant get the length of my house either, too many walls to go through.

But you signal shouldnt drop off that quickly, in the same room
It may be a faulty router, faulty arial (is it a screw on arial) , a fault wifi card/arial in the laptop
If you have damp walls or foil insulation that can hurt things . Ive known of a wide bookcase full of old books cut the signal between rooms.

Try moving the router somewhere else in the room. The arials should be pointing straight up. Ideally the router wont be on the floor , maybe on a desk .
TURN OFF all cordless phones , video signal extenders and any other 2.4 devices & see if that helps

Powerline adaptors should be plugged directly into the wall, not via multiboxes or double adapters or UPS's .
What powerline brand did you have issues with.
Some dont come with any setup CD , that may have to be downloaded separately. Very annoying when you are trying to install onsite only to find no
CD or detailed manual . So , they saved 50c on not a cheap model :-(



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  Reply # 1130649 17-Sep-2014 13:17
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1101:
Even a couple of meters loses a bar of signal. .....How far should a normal router carry?



line of site wifi can go much further than the length of your house . Walls and doors attenuate the signal. Interference can knock it off completely.
I cant get the length of my house either, too many walls to go through.

But you signal shouldnt drop off that quickly, in the same room
It may be a faulty router, faulty arial (is it a screw on arial) , a fault wifi card/arial in the laptop
If you have damp walls or foil insulation that can hurt things . Ive known of a wide bookcase full of old books cut the signal between rooms.

Try moving the router somewhere else in the room. The arials should be pointing straight up. Ideally the router wont be on the floor , maybe on a desk .
TURN OFF all cordless phones , video signal extenders and any other 2.4 devices & see if that helps

Powerline adaptors should be plugged directly into the wall, not via multiboxes or double adapters or UPS's .
What powerline brand did you have issues with.
Some dont come with any setup CD , that may have to be downloaded separately. Very annoying when you are trying to install onsite only to find no
CD or detailed manual . So , they saved 50c on not a cheap model :-(

 

 

Our router is actually a gateway device that also handles the RBI signal. The wi-fi aerial is internal so nothing that protrudes from the box. We live in an old farmhouse, no insulation at all, just dry wood walls. The router is just off the floor, mounted to the wall under a shelf. I have no idea what the orientation of the aerial is since it is internal. It would be very difficult to move the router at all since it is mounted to the wall and also held in place by the RBI antenna cable. The powerline adapter was a Geeya W2211 200Mbps Powerline Adapter. It did not come with a CD or any useful instructions. I had to guess at it. There is a pushbutton and a recessed reset button. The pushbutton can be used to set up an encrypted connection but the one time it did work all I did was plug it in. I think when plugged in it is supposed to automatically set up a normal connection. There are three leds that come on briefly when plugged in then come on again after a moment to indicate status. One is the network led. The one time that came on and stayed on everything worked perfectly but it went off after awhile and I could never get it to come on again. That is my story.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1130669 17-Sep-2014 13:34
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Rikkitic: The powerline adapter was a Geeya W2211 200Mbps Powerline Adapter. It did not come with a CD or any useful instructions. I had to guess at it. There is a pushbutton and a recessed reset button. The pushbutton can be used to set up an encrypted connection but the one time it did work all I did was plug it in. I think when plugged in it is supposed to automatically set up a normal connection. There are three leds that come on briefly when plugged in then come on again after a moment to indicate status. One is the network led. The one time that came on and stayed on everything worked perfectly but it went off after awhile and I could never get it to come on again. That is my story.


just wondering....
did the powerline adaptor come as a kit ( a pair) or a single unit ? You really need a matching pair, sender/receiver: ie a kit.
Ive  noticed some are sold as single units : pretty much useless?? & defeats the purpose

http://www.szgeeya.com/index.php?m=content&c=index&a=show&catid=14&id=4

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  Reply # 1130671 17-Sep-2014 13:43
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Depending on what your budget is, if you can stretch to $155 for these they would be the easiest solution to the laptops at other end of the house:

http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETTPL0422

A powerline solution again, with a built in wireless access point from a quality brand.

If the RBI router is affixed vertically and not horizontally, that could be a reason for poor wireless coverage from it.

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  Reply # 1130700 17-Sep-2014 14:11
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jonb: Depending on what your budget is, if you can stretch to $155 for these they would be the easiest solution to the laptops at other end of the house:

http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?z=p&p=NETTPL0422

A powerline solution again, with a built in wireless access point from a quality brand.

If the RBI router is affixed vertically and not horizontally, that could be a reason for poor wireless coverage from it.


many wifi routers do have those holes for mounting against the wall  . Have to wonder just what they were thinking
Perhaps they have 2 internal aerials , aligned horz & vert.  ??

Flip the notebook vertical & see if the wifi reception is any better :-)



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  Reply # 1130707 17-Sep-2014 14:23
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I think I will give the TP Link a try. It looks like good quality. The router was originally flat on the shelf and I mounted it to get it out of the way. When I did I carefully checked the reception and it made no difference at all. That is one of the frustrating things about this. Almost nothing seems to make a real difference. Whatever I try it just carries on with the same crappy signal.

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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