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Topic # 180792 22-Sep-2015 11:18
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I'm about to get VDSL installed at my new house and I need to get a few things clear in my head before the technician comes around because I don't want this messed up.

First, here's a picture of a panel that's on the inside west wall of my garage.  It's not a great quality picture, but it's one I had access to from here at work and it should be good enough to ask my questions (click image for full sized version):
Click to see full size

(1) is a standard white square telecomms access point with a single BT socket, and a printed label saying ADSL - and I know that the previous occupants had ADSL broadband.
(2) is an array of twelve RJ45 sockets that I assume are connected to sockets in the house - many rooms have plates on the wall that contain one BT and one RJ45 socket.

The ETP is on the outside east wall of the garage, so it's not just behind this panel - it's the width of a double garage away.  I mention this to say that if any additional wiring between the ETP and the panel was required it wouldn't be a simple job (or at least would result in exposed wires being stapled to my inside garage walls).

And my current modem/router is a standard issue Spark "business gateway", i.e. the Huawei HG659.

So what should happen when the VDSL install is done?  In my head, the process goes something like this:

 

  • a master splitter is installed in the ETP,
  • the split off line to be used for VDSL connects to access point (1),
  • the socket in access point (1) should be upgraded from BT to RJxx (11, 45, ??),
  • a short patch cable is plugged into access point (1) and connected to the RJ45 socket in array (2) that connects to the socket in the house where I want the modem/router to sit.
  • the modem gets plugged into the patched socket.
Is that more or less it, or am I on the wrong track?

Also, is it possible that access point (1) indicates there might already be a master splitter in the ETP, even though the previous occupants had ADSL?  If they were sharing a line for their phone and modem (presumably with in-line filters) then what would that ADSL access point be for?

And my final question is: If I upgrade the modem/router in the future, could I locate a modem in the panel, connect it to the world via access point (1), then connect via array (2) to two or three routers or access points in different parts of the house so I get better wireless coverage?

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  Reply # 1391757 22-Sep-2015 11:40
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Master splitters existed long before VDSL was invented. cool

I'd expect them to upgrade the splitter and relabel the ADSL socket as VDSL.

As you have power in the cabinet I'd install the modem first and see what the wireless performance is in the house.  You can use the cabling already there to connect the TV and any other devices that perform better over a wired connection.



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  Reply # 1391820 22-Sep-2015 12:22
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graemeh: As you have power in the cabinet I'd install the modem first and see what the wireless performance is in the house.  You can use the cabling already there to connect the TV and any other devices that perform better over a wired connection.

I'd certainly do this in the future if I upgrade my network hardware, but am not sure it's the best solution with the current combined Huawei modem/router.  The panel is located in the garage, which is the only part of the house on the ground level, and it's also offset to the side of the rest of the house.  The bedrooms and study are on the next storey and the lounge and family room are up one more.  If I install the Huawei in the cabinet I'm concerned the wifi signal might not be too good particularly in the lounge, two storeys up, with one brick wall, several plasterboard walls, and two wooden floors in between.  I'd rather locate it on top of a cabinet in my kitchen, which is right next to the lounge and family room, and immediately above the study and two main bedrooms.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1391830 22-Sep-2015 12:31
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andrew027:
graemeh: As you have power in the cabinet I'd install the modem first and see what the wireless performance is in the house.  You can use the cabling already there to connect the TV and any other devices that perform better over a wired connection.

I'd certainly do this in the future if I upgrade my network hardware, but am not sure it's the best solution with the current combined Huawei modem/router.  The panel is located in the garage, which is the only part of the house on the ground level, and it's also offset to the side of the rest of the house.  The bedrooms and study are on the next storey and the lounge and family room are up one more.  If I install the Huawei in the cabinet I'm concerned the wifi signal might not be too good particularly in the lounge, two storeys up, with one brick wall, several plasterboard walls, and two wooden floors in between.  I'd rather locate it on top of a cabinet in my kitchen, which is right next to the lounge and family room, and immediately above the study and two main bedrooms.


+1

A very bad prognosis for wireless from outside the dwelling - esp as you have a multi-story house.

You may be better off with wireless access points (eg Ubiquiti UniFi) on each floor.




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  Reply # 1391850 22-Sep-2015 12:44
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Sideface: You may be better off with wireless access points (eg Ubiquiti UniFi) on each floor.

Hmm, those look good.  I particularly like the billing aspect - maybe I can start charging my daughter for all the data she uses!

But for the immediate future it's just going to be the Huawei, so are my original thoughts on the install process sound?  I want to be really clear on what has to be done, particularly as it is likely my wife will be there on install day and not me.

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  Reply # 1391868 22-Sep-2015 12:48
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Are you sure you will even get a splitter installed?


Quite a few ISPs don't offer free splitter installs as standard anymore (it costs them $300 more to get a splitter installed by Chorus - which is an absolute rip off)

ISPs that are known to not offer this anymore as standard on all VDSL installs:

Bigpipe
2Degrees (Snap)
Slingshot
Vodafone

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  Reply # 1391869 22-Sep-2015 12:48
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 But for the immediate future it's just going to be the Huawei, so are my original thoughts on the install process sound?  I want to be really clear on what has to be done, particularly as it is likely my wife will be there on install day and not me.


Yes they are.  You could even set up the gear before the Chorus tech arrives and then all they will need to do is upgrade the splitter and possibly change the BT socket to RJ45 (this would be good to do but not essential).



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  Reply # 1391874 22-Sep-2015 12:55
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NonprayingMantis: Are you sure you will even get a splitter installed?

Quite a few ISPs don't offer free splitter installs as standard anymore (it costs them $300 more to get a splitter installed by Chorus - which is an absolute rip off)

ISPs that are known to not offer this anymore as standard on all VDSL installs:

Bigpipe
2Degrees (Snap)
Slingshot
Vodafone

I'm with Spark.  I don't mind if the splitter isn't free (athough it would be great if it was!).  I'm happy to pay for it if necessary, because everything I've read says you should have one.

graemeh: Yes they are.  You could even set up the gear before the Chorus tech arrives and then all they will need to do is upgrade the splitter and possibly change the BT socket to RJ45 (this would be good to do but not essential).

Excellent, thanks.  I'll have to get a short patch cable for the cabinet but should have everything else ready to go.

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  Reply # 1392954 23-Sep-2015 18:34
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As mentioned, access points for each floor should be your long term plan.

Not sure how well that wiring was done, I could see some wires exposed there but can't tell if they were properly twisted. Its interesting that the hiband voice blocks have been used there, have Cat5e going to them so you could work out another project to change everything to RJ45 if you run out of data outlets in future.

Easiest way to get VDSL to the kitchen would be to put a phone cable from that ADSL outlet to the appropriate socket on your data panel. You don't want to use the phone wiring because the phone outlets are all shared with an unfiltered phone signal, whereas VDSL needs its own direct link from the splitter. 




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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