Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
Talk DIrtY to me
4285 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2298

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1508136 8-Mar-2016 14:49
Send private message

BTW, (at) coffeebaron is going to be getting a lot of emails pointing him to this thread!


1440 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 321

Trusted

  Reply # 1508160 8-Mar-2016 15:12
One person supports this post
Send private message

If you are in a UFB area, consider that the ONT for the fibre connection is best located at the hub of your structured cabling. Not a problem if you locate the enclosure in the garage, but you may want to think about that too.



2610 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 604

Trusted

  Reply # 1508165 8-Mar-2016 15:21
Send private message

jonb: If you are in a UFB area, consider that the ONT for the fibre connection is best located at the hub of your structured cabling. Not a problem if you locate the enclosure in the garage, but you may want to think about that too.

 

Not in a UFB area yet (2018 ETA), but am keenly aware of having placement in an area where the ONT will eventually reside.


1455 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 324


  Reply # 1508316 8-Mar-2016 17:02
Send private message

DarthKermit:

 

Jase2985:

 

electrician for data wiring? asking for trouble

 

 

What could possibly go wrong? tongue-out

 

 

Ha
You mean like bare network cables poking out of the wall. Nothing terminated, connected or labled .
Or tested.
The usual is for sparkies to label nothing  :-(

 

My Boss has seen network cables wound around nails by the sparkie installer


764 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 156


  Reply # 1508351 8-Mar-2016 18:14
3 people support this post
Send private message

DarthKermit:

Jase2985:


electrician for data wiring? asking for trouble



What could possibly go wrong? tongue-out



Sparkie does power. Data cabler does signal.

5061 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1030

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1508530 8-Mar-2016 22:40
Send private message

sbiddle:

 

IMHO I'd never run single outlets anywhere. The biggest cost is labour, so if you're running cable it's no more effort to run 2.

 

 

I ran single outlets and ensure they were somewhere where a switch could be added conveniently. I ended up with a 4-port switch in most rooms. It seemed to go OK....and meant I could expand the network as needed in any given room.   

 

This was before WiFi hits peeds like 300mbps making a wired network seem redundant.

 

Having just reached 526Mbps on wifi today it seems even more redundant. Particularly as now (different house) only have two devices that even have an ethernet port. Every other device is wifi only.  

 

 





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


21133 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4217

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1508546 8-Mar-2016 23:28
Send private message

Cant put HDMI over wifi without taking it all up on a lossy encoding HDMI over IP box.

 

That wifi speed is reliant on clean 5GHz spectrum without anything attenuating it on the way, so you still need cat5/6 to get the accesspoint close enough to actually get those speeds.





Richard rich.ms

3327 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 632

Trusted

  Reply # 1508595 9-Mar-2016 07:16
Send private message

if you wanted to be cheap, and didnt want to actually connect the rj45 connectors yourself (really they arent hard to do, its all colour coded and you can buy a tester off trademe for like $10), you can just use fixed length cables and then use these types of connectors

 

 

 

that means you dont have to do any actual wiring yourself, just run the cat6 cables from one end and clip them in.  super simple, and very cheap.  It does mean the cables wont be the perfect size, you and might have some extra cable jsut sitting in the wall, but thats no biggie.

 

 

 

also agree with more than 1 port in each area, I've got 48 ports in my 4 bedroom single level house :P




2610 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 604

Trusted

  Reply # 1508610 9-Mar-2016 08:06
Send private message

Linuxluver:

 

I ran single outlets and ensure they were somewhere where a switch could be added conveniently. I ended up with a 4-port switch in most rooms. It seemed to go OK....and meant I could expand the network as needed in any given room.   

 

This was before WiFi hits peeds like 300mbps making a wired network seem redundant.

 

Having just reached 526Mbps on wifi today it seems even more redundant. Particularly as now (different house) only have two devices that even have an ethernet port. Every other device is wifi only.  

 

 

 

Yeah, I'm not adverse to going the switch route for places that need it. I currently do that in our lounge, from a connection fed from a Powerline adapter. And I have a couple of unneeded routers which can be repurposed as switches.

 

I've already started getting pushback from my wife in terms of the scope of my plans. She is concerned that having multiple ports at each outlet will increase the cost, but I suspect the actual increase won't be huge. Another primary concern of hers (and one where we disagree) is that we don't need outlets in every bedroom (we have 5 + a study, which will initially be a craft room).

 

She is correct in pointing out that our teenagers prefer to use wireless in their bedrooms to access to their laptops, as they don't like being constrained in one spot. So initially the outlets probably won't get used. Yet the kids bitch and moan at me when wifi performance is poor. Our house is 271 m2,  so we do have issues getting the wifi signal from one end of the house to the other. 2.4Ghz is pretty much useless in our area due to congestion, and the 5Ghz band struggles to cover the whole area. 

 

I'm also thinking of resale value, and future use (including uses that we haven't thought of yet). But the reality is that budget is an issue, and if it is going to exceed $1000 by too much (that's my budget, but I may have a couple hundy wiggle room) then I won't be able to do it at all.

I note that Cat6 is generally recommended, but would scaling back to Cat5e be that bad? It may help keep the costs down.


26495 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6038

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1508622 9-Mar-2016 08:39
4 people support this post
Send private message

Linuxluver:

 

sbiddle:

 

IMHO I'd never run single outlets anywhere. The biggest cost is labour, so if you're running cable it's no more effort to run 2.

 

 

I ran single outlets and ensure they were somewhere where a switch could be added conveniently. I ended up with a 4-port switch in most rooms. It seemed to go OK....and meant I could expand the network as needed in any given room.   

 

This was before WiFi hits peeds like 300mbps making a wired network seem redundant.

 

Having just reached 526Mbps on wifi today it seems even more redundant. Particularly as now (different house) only have two devices that even have an ethernet port. Every other device is wifi only.  

 

 

 

 

WiFi is only a complementary offering to Ethernet, it is not and never will be a replacement.

 

WiFi is still only half duplex which means it's going to deliver pretty poor performance compared to Ethernet for some tasks regardless of speedtest results.

 

As we move to an era of 5GHz becoming the norm and 60GHz now hitting the market multiple access points in a house will become essential to deliver coverage and performance - and the best way to hook up multiple access points is Ethernet cables. 60GHz will mean every room in the house that wants 802.11ad (which will deliver 2Gbps) performance will require it's own AP. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1440 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 321

Trusted

  Reply # 1508628 9-Mar-2016 09:05
Send private message

 It should be under $1000 if you do the terminations yourself, at your own pace, but I think over $2000 if you pay someone else to.  A punchdown tool and wire cutter is basically all you need.




2610 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 604

Trusted

  Reply # 1508631 9-Mar-2016 09:19
Send private message

jonb:

 

 It should be under $1000 if you do the terminations yourself, at your own pace, but I think over $2000 if you pay someone else to.  A punchdown tool and wire cutter is basically all you need.

 

 

That's another area my wife is a little nervous, but looking at YouTube videos, it looks reasonably easy to do. 

 

Disclaimer: I have no real experience with wiring or electronics, so the scope for FUBARism is reasonably broad :-)


1631 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 333

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1508680 9-Mar-2016 09:56
Send private message

dclegg:

 

jonb:

 

 It should be under $1000 if you do the terminations yourself, at your own pace, but I think over $2000 if you pay someone else to.  A punchdown tool and wire cutter is basically all you need.

 

 

That's another area my wife is a little nervous, but looking at YouTube videos, it looks reasonably easy to do. 

 

Disclaimer: I have no real experience with wiring or electronics, so the scope for FUBARism is reasonably broad :-)

 

 

Plus the time you will spend tracing and correcting cockups.... 8 wires per end... rinse and repeat each and everytime to get it right.... hope you've got a good way to test before the weatherboards go back on...





________
AK

 

 

 

Click to see full size




2610 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 604

Trusted

  Reply # 1508684 9-Mar-2016 10:02
Send private message

antoniosk:

 

 

 

Plus the time you will spend tracing and correcting cockups.... 8 wires per end... rinse and repeat each and everytime to get it right.... hope you've got a good way to test before the weatherboards go back on...

 

 

 

 

Oh, I'm sure there'll be cockups if I do it. But it would not be feasible for me to do this until after we've moved back in (therefore cladding back on). 

 

Won't the only real risk be me stuffing up the terminations, with no problems with the laid cables themselves? And can't I use a cable tester to help with this?

 

I may also be able to outsource this step to someone more knowledgable afterwards, if it is unfeasible for me to do it (although initial Googling has me brimming with possibly misplaced confidence ;-)).


564 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 484


  Reply # 1508702 9-Mar-2016 10:20
One person supports this post
Send private message

Another option...

 

Given that:

 

1) You're time-bound

 

2) You're budget conscious

 

3) You're wary of DIY failure potential

 

4) You have a window of opportunity where you will have significant access to wall cavities

 

Then:

 

Forget about running cables.

 

Instead:

 

1) Identify the "best" location for a network "hub" on your property

 

2) Install a cabinet similar to the Dynamix item from computerstore.co.nz earlier in this thread.  (Vynco also do nice ones)  Flush-mounted options will improve the spouse-approval-factor!

 

2a) As above - remember to include a power source in the cabinet.

 

3) Install conduit and drawstrings into the wall cavities.  Use cheap blanking plates on the walls where you intend to terminate them and run them back to your cabinet.

 

 

 

That way, you can run cable and install end-point jacks when and where you need them.  You can start off with a basic 4-port DSL router if you like and upgrade to a properly terminated patch panel and switch when time/budget suits.  You can run as multiple drawstrings through each conduit with almost zero added expense.

 

That's what I'd do anyway :-)  YMMV


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

N4L helping TAKA Trust bridge the digital divide for Lower Hutt students
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:08


Winners Announced for 2018 CIO Awards
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:03


Logitech Rally sets new standard for USB-connected video conference cameras
Posted 18-Jun-2018 09:27


Russell Stanners steps down as Vodafone NZ CEO
Posted 12-Jun-2018 09:13


Intergen recognised as 2018 Microsoft Country Partner of the Year for New Zealand
Posted 12-Jun-2018 08:00


Finalists Announced For Microsoft NZ Partner Awards
Posted 6-Jun-2018 15:12


Vocus Group and Vodafone announce joint venture to accelerate fibre innovation
Posted 5-Jun-2018 10:52


Kogan.com to launch Kogan Mobile in New Zealand
Posted 4-Jun-2018 14:34


Enable doubles fibre broadband speeds for its most popular wholesale service in Christchurch
Posted 2-Jun-2018 20:07


All or Nothing: New Zealand All Blacks arrives on Amazon Prime Video
Posted 2-Jun-2018 16:21


Innovation Grant, High Tech Awards and new USA office for Kiwi tech company SwipedOn
Posted 1-Jun-2018 20:54


Commerce Commission warns Apple for misleading consumers about their rights
Posted 30-May-2018 13:15


IBM leads Call for Code to use cloud, data, AI, blockchain for natural disaster relief
Posted 25-May-2018 14:12


New FUJIFILM X-T100 aims to do better job than smartphones
Posted 24-May-2018 20:17


Stuff takes 100% ownership of Stuff Fibre
Posted 24-May-2018 19:41



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.