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200 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1521959 29-Mar-2016 01:29
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coffeebaron: You can do lots with the Draytek. Optional content filtering license. Profile rules for devices etc.
ok thanks, do you know if the draytek is consumer or business grade? after reading http://routersecurity.org I think I would now prefer to get a non consumer grade router. I care more for security than outright speed.


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  Reply # 1521974 29-Mar-2016 07:31
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The dreyteks are not bad units. I use one myself, it doesnt have wifi but it has given me a solid vdsl line. About 26mbps up and 70mbps down, doesn't drop sync.

 

What you are after is WPA2 when it comes to wifi security. WPS is an older term for automated setup of WIFI, as of recent using a 4-5 digit pin has been a very easy way to break in to a WPS setup.

 

If you are concerned about parental control then perhaps you can look at some netgear products they have parental control software you can get for your PC or your phone. Most of the ISP supplied routers are actually a bit better now days, but I don't know what they have in terms of parental control. 

 

You should see if you can get fibre. Ask the landlord they might say yes. The upload speeds will be far superior and the quality of the connection will be better. You have ADSL now which will be fine, so I guess you can wait a bit for the fibre to get installed.

 

 

 

 






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  Reply # 1522012 29-Mar-2016 08:45
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IronH:

 

coffeebaron: You can do lots with the Draytek. Optional content filtering license. Profile rules for devices etc.
ok thanks, do you know if the draytek is consumer or business grade? after reading http://routersecurity.org I think I would now prefer to get a non consumer grade router. I care more for security than outright speed.

 

 

Mostly business grade. I install a lot of 2800 series for business. They just keep on going.

 

 





Chorus has spent $1.4 billion on making their xDSL broadband network faster. If your still stuck on ADSL or VDSL, why not spend from $150 on a master filter install to make sure you are getting the most out of your connection?
I install - Naked DSL, DSL Master Splitters, VoIP, data cabling and general computer support for home and small business.
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200 posts

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  Reply # 1522155 29-Mar-2016 11:41
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darylblake:

 

The dreyteks are not bad units. I use one myself, it doesnt have wifi but it has given me a solid vdsl line. About 26mbps up and 70mbps down, doesn't drop sync.

 

What you are after is WPA2 when it comes to wifi security. WPS is an older term for automated setup of WIFI, as of recent using a 4-5 digit pin has been a very easy way to break in to a WPS setup. 

WPA2 is what I always use but that isn't what I am asking. Performance is not my major concern, security is. Have you got any links that say WPS is now secure, because everywhere I look WPS is still a major security flaw and even today there is no guarantee that the unit you buy will actually disable WPS when you select the option to disable it. Have a look at routersecurity.org. 




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  Reply # 1522157 29-Mar-2016 11:43
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I emailed Dlink and I now have it in writing that the DSL2880AL does support VDSL. Not going to get it anyway considering how many security flaws Dlink units seem to have, but wierd that it isn't mentioned on the specs sheet.


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  Reply # 1522160 29-Mar-2016 11:53
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nakedmolerat:
DarkShadow:

 

nakedmolerat:
I would request vdsl from your current ISP and apply NEW fiber connection (without telling them you're a current adsl/vdsl customer).

 

 

 

As the person who will be processing your request, please don't do this. Tell us your full requirements, and let us figure out what's the best way to accomplish what you want. We know the ins and outs of the system.

 



@DarkShadow can you tell me why this is bad? This has always been the advice given on geekzone over time. In fact i did this myself to ensure continuity of the service. If you're installing fiber to the property, why do you need to know about the current copper account (with another company)? They are separate services and independent of one another.

 

 

 

Your first post sounded like you're going to get VDSL and fibre from the same company. In that case I would want to know about it so I can put you on the best plan.

 

If you're signing up to VDSL and fibre from different companies, then yeah you don't need to tell me about it.




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  Reply # 1531224 12-Apr-2016 23:22
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so I got VDSL, but during the install the technician said I wouldn't need permission from my neighbours to get fibre, so I contacted my ISP on the day my VDSL got installed and requested fibre, they were more than happy to change me to fibre and ship me out another modem/router :)


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1531290 13-Apr-2016 07:28
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DarthKermit:

IronH:


 


VDSL and fibre is available on my street. However I am four houses off the street and have a shared driveway which is all concrete with no grass verge. 


Although I'd like fibre, getting permission from my neighbours is going to be difficult so am leaning towards VDSL.


 



You've got nothing to lose by trying to get fibre and talking to your neighbours about the benefits of fibre. Eventually the copper network will go as maintaining two parallel networks doesn't stack up economically.



Fibre can be installed high above ground so you might not need your neighbours' permission to get fibre laid under the driveway.

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  Reply # 1531301 13-Apr-2016 07:54
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Kiwifruta:
DarthKermit:

 

IronH:

 

VDSL and fibre is available on my street. However I am four houses off the street and have a shared driveway which is all concrete with no grass verge. 

 

 

 

Although I'd like fibre, getting permission from my neighbours is going to be difficult so am leaning towards VDSL.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You've got nothing to lose by trying to get fibre and talking to your neighbours about the benefits of fibre. Eventually the copper network will go as maintaining two parallel networks doesn't stack up economically.

 



Fibre can be installed high above ground so you might not need your neighbours' permission to get fibre laid under the driveway.

 

Pretty sure you still need your neighbours permission for an aerial feed in


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  Reply # 1531313 13-Apr-2016 08:22
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Jase2985:

 

Kiwifruta:
DarthKermit:

 

IronH:

 

VDSL and fibre is available on my street. However I am four houses off the street and have a shared driveway which is all concrete with no grass verge. 

 

 

 

Although I'd like fibre, getting permission from my neighbours is going to be difficult so am leaning towards VDSL.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You've got nothing to lose by trying to get fibre and talking to your neighbours about the benefits of fibre. Eventually the copper network will go as maintaining two parallel networks doesn't stack up economically.

 



Fibre can be installed high above ground so you might not need your neighbours' permission to get fibre laid under the driveway.

 

Pretty sure you still need your neighbours permission for an aerial feed in

 

 

Depends.

 

An overhead lead-in can no longer have an aerial trespass (ie cross somebody else's property). There are plenty of legacy cases of this in the copper world, however this can no longer occur for copper or fibre.

 

If the overhead lead-in doesn't cross anybody else's property (which is highly unlikely in this case) no permission would be required.

 

 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1532479 13-Apr-2016 11:56
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sbiddle:

Jase2985:


Kiwifruta:
DarthKermit:


IronH:


VDSL and fibre is available on my street. However I am four houses off the street and have a shared driveway which is all concrete with no grass verge. 


 


Although I'd like fibre, getting permission from my neighbours is going to be difficult so am leaning towards VDSL.


 


 


 


You've got nothing to lose by trying to get fibre and talking to your neighbours about the benefits of fibre. Eventually the copper network will go as maintaining two parallel networks doesn't stack up economically.




Fibre can be installed high above ground so you might not need your neighbours' permission to get fibre laid under the driveway.


Pretty sure you still need your neighbours permission for an aerial feed in



Depends.


An overhead lead-in can no longer have an aerial trespass (ie cross somebody else's property). There are plenty of legacy cases of this in the copper world, however this can no longer occur for copper or fibre.


If the overhead lead-in doesn't cross anybody else's property (which is highly unlikely in this case) no permission would be required.


 



Just to clarify, I meant there is an other option other than getting the neighbours' permission to get fibre laid under the driveway because perhaps getting the neighbours' permission to install the fibre line overhead would be easier to obtain.

When UFF installed our fibre they said 40 metres was the longest they could horizontally drill.

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  Reply # 1533793 15-Apr-2016 22:28
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 Sometimes the UFB fibre will be run along the fence or overhead, so still worth getting the process started and see how they decide to get the fibre in.





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

734 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1533865 16-Apr-2016 08:34
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Agreed re: ask for a fibre scope. They can try to run it from the street to your house via the existing copper telephone cable, which is already in place.

 

In terms of network topology, grab a draytek 130 modem (if you're staying with copper). It does ADSL2 and VDSL2. Hook that into a pfSense box for your router, then run that to a switch and from there to as many wireless APs as you need (you can repurpose your exisiting consumer wi-fi routers for this if you don't want to spring for dedicated APs). Future proofed, flexible, kick-ass.




200 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1534840 18-Apr-2016 12:13
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sultanoswing:

 

Agreed re: ask for a fibre scope. They can try to run it from the street to your house via the existing copper telephone cable, which is already in place.

 

 

 

This. the vdsl tech said the pipe from the street to the house carrying the copper line is 20mm with plenty room to spare for a fibre cable. So they can blow the cable up the pipe to the house, or use the existing copper to pull the fibre through - no need for neighbor permission.


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