Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3
2858 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1596201 21-Jul-2016 12:55
Send private message

If you can excuse my ignorance, but what are the advantages to running this compared to an off the shelf UPS? I have a standard UPS on a shelf beside my ONT.

 

Cheers, Matt.





My views (except when I am looking out their windows) are not those of my employer.

15249 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1596205 21-Jul-2016 12:58
4 people support this post
Send private message

With a standard UPS you convert 240V to 12VDC, store it in a battery, then put it through a DC to AC converter to get to 230V, which then converts it back to 12V DC. Those multiple conversions are inefficient and affect runtime. A standard UPS has quite a lot of overhead, for example my old Dynalink one uses 20W when it's turned off! So by using one 12V power supply, storing in directly, and powering all devices from a single PSU or battery you get much more runtime for the same battery size.

 

There's no word from anyone whether you're meant to use a different power supply, so there's a risk there, but I've accepted that minimal risk.


 
 
 
 


15249 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1596206 21-Jul-2016 12:58
2 people support this post
Send private message

jonathan18:

 

Thanks for following up with those questions, Tim.

 

That battery life's not as bad as I'd thought it may be, but that it is not swappable makes it somewhat inflexible compared to the current option. Apart from the neatness of a single box, I don't think it's got many meaningful advantages over the current model, so will probably go with the latter.

 

 

Agree. I think the all in one unit would be ideal for someone like parents or grandparents who want Internet to work if the power goes out for a short time, but isn't really suitable for long term power. 




1906 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1596416 21-Jul-2016 17:28
Send private message

plus, they're bigger


BDFL - Memuneh
64690 posts

Uber Geek

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1597276 23-Jul-2016 15:05
2 people support this post
Send private message

MadEngineer:
freitasm:

 

As per Tim's reply above, not sure about "finally" as Constant Vigil Sentry UPS has been in the market for months already.

 

are they supplied with the 8 pin connector used by the ONT?

 

Here is the Sentry Lite and the ONT connector. It comes with an extra output cable too if your router is not next to the ONT.

 

 

 

 





BDFL - Memuneh
64690 posts

Uber Geek

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1597284 23-Jul-2016 15:33
Send private message

I have just swapped my ONT and Synology router from the Dynamix UPS to the Sentry Lite. The Synology is about three metres away from the ONT (on a desk whle ONT is on a wall). The long output cable came in handy here. Both ONT and Synology powered up with no problems.







1906 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1597373 23-Jul-2016 17:56
Send private message

Awesome. _b

 

Can these only be purchased through their website?


 
 
 
 


15249 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1597392 23-Jul-2016 18:05
Send private message

The new unit not available for six weeks. Older (and better IMHO) units available only from their website AFAIK, but I'm not an expert on the company.


1990 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 1597746 24-Jul-2016 15:07
Send private message

bcourtney:

 

Any idea what these go for? Not having luck googling a NZ reseller

 

 

Cablemax





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^



1906 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1597784 24-Jul-2016 17:11
Send private message

or, any computer shop.


neb

1187 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1601803 31-Jul-2016 18:36
Send private message

timmmay:

With a standard UPS you convert 240V to 12VDC, store it in a battery, then put it through a DC to AC converter to get to 230V, which then converts it back to 12V DC. Those multiple conversions are inefficient and affect runtime.

 

That's only with an online UPS though, with a standby UPS the only time you're ever running the inverter is when there's a power cut. In addition a "12V UPS" isn't just a 12V battery, you need to run a buck/boost converter to get 12V out from whatever the battery voltage currently is. So in normal operation a 240V UPS is 240V in -> UPS -> 12V power supply (the UPS is a dumb wire), and a 12V UPS is 240V in -> 12V out, the same thing. Only when there's an outage does the 240V UPS run the inverter to produce 240V out, while the 12V UPS runs the buck/boost circuitry to produce 12V out directly. However, you can also get a pretty decent second-hand UPS off Trademe for less than the cost of a 12V UPS, and it'll run things other than 12V devices, so it's a bit hard to find a strong argument for using a 12V UPS. I've been trying to convince myself that it's worth getting one to replace/complement my 1500SUA and it's pretty hard to find a convincing reason to get one.

15249 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1601819 31-Jul-2016 18:55
Send private message

     

  1. Runtime from the same battery is higher using the DC directly, rather than going DC -> AC -> DC. I looked it up, the difference is really significant
  2. I can connect a cheap ebay device to the battery and charge my phone directly, again more efficient than conversions
  3. I can have multiple batteries, giving me much more runtime (I have 100AH of batteries).
  4. New DC UPS is cheaper than a new AC UPS

 

I actually have an AC UPS sitting on the floor not doing anything, though it might need a new battery. The size of the battery is probably around 8AH.


neb

1187 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1601829 31-Jul-2016 19:27
Send private message

Hmm, I'm still not convinced. My current UPS will run all the stuff off it for many hours (never managed to run it to zero), any decent UPS will have extended battery packs available, and as a bonus they have graphical displays telling you when you need to start shutting things down. In addition a lot of stuff will talk to the UPS via USB and automatically shut itself down as needed. Now I'm not saying don't use a 12V UPS, I just haven't been able to find a really compelling argument to do so.

15249 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1601914 31-Jul-2016 20:46
One person supports this post
Send private message

neb: Hmm, I'm still not convinced. My current UPS will run all the stuff off it for many hours (never managed to run it to zero), any decent UPS will have extended battery packs available, and as a bonus they have graphical displays telling you when you need to start shutting things down. In addition a lot of stuff will talk to the UPS via USB and automatically shut itself down as needed. Now I'm not saying don't use a 12V UPS, I just haven't been able to find a really compelling argument to do so.

 

I suggest you don't buy one then ;) That's why there are different products, because everyone wants something different. Yes a standard AC UPS would work as well, but it's less efficient and less flexible for what I need. I have a standard UPS for other stuff.

 

I can run for something like 5 days, I can charge everything (phone, batteries, etc) and it cost me a total of $200. I got a pretty crazy good deal on the batteries though.


neb

1187 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1602301 1-Aug-2016 15:03
Send private message

Oh, absolutely. I was trying to find a reason to get one, but hadn't managed to convince myself either way. Like you with the batteries, I got a good deal on the 1500SUA so it's an easy solution to go with.

1 | 2 | 3
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Arlo unveils its first video doorbell
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:27


New Zealand students shortlisted for James Dyson Award
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:18


Norton LifeLock Launches Norton 360
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:11


Microsoft New Zealand Partner Awards results
Posted 18-Oct-2019 10:18


Logitech introduces new Made for Google keyboard and mouse devices
Posted 16-Oct-2019 13:36


MATTR launches to accelerate decentralised identity
Posted 16-Oct-2019 10:28


Vodafone X-Squad powers up for customers
Posted 16-Oct-2019 08:15


D Link ANZ launches EXO Smart Mesh Wi Fi Routers with McAfee protection
Posted 15-Oct-2019 11:31


Major Japanese retailer partners with smart New Zealand technology IMAGR
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:29


Ola pioneers one-time passcode feature to fight rideshare fraud
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:24


Spark Sport new home of NZC matches from 2020
Posted 10-Oct-2019 09:59


Meet Nola, Noel Leeming's new digital employee
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:07


Registrations for Sprout Accelerator open for 2020 season
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:02


Teletrac Navman welcomes AI tech leader Jens Meggers as new President
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:41


Vodafone makes voice of 4G (VoLTE) official
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:36



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.