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  Reply # 1617721 26-Aug-2016 10:04
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chevrolux:

 

Telepermit aside.... I just wouldn't want my business relying on $10 modems out of China.

 

Sure the other manufacturers have factories there, but they also have very high quality control ie Apple. That's what you are paying for. And sure, NZ distributors are putting a markup on the kit. But we all have to make a bit of money somewhere.

 

If an ADSL modem is all you need, Snappernet still have the Draytek 120 available very cheap.

 

 

 

 

why there is nothing wrong with the big brand Chinese products such as Huawei. Large chunks of the internet in NZ is driven by Huawei equipment and there have been some large enterprise installs in NZ. EG Agile network for Lincoln University.

 

With respect you need to ignore the FUD being generated from some sources.





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  Reply # 1617849 26-Aug-2016 13:14
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I have seen the problems first hand where modems do not conform to exactly the same standard whether it is ADSL, ADSL2+ or VDSL. Sometimes some modems have slight differences which can cause issues when connected to the Telecom/Chorus network.

 

In fact Telecom at the time had a lab where a modem could be tested to ensure it would work ok on the Telecom network, I presume Chorus still have it

 

Also when new firmware comes out for the Dslam there had to extensive testing on a number of modems and even then not all problems are found.

 

I know because I used to investigate and try and isolate the problems when Dslams have been upgraded and there is an increase in unusual faults being reported.

 

Of course this type of thing is not good for the poor old customer who may have lost service in the meantime


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  Reply # 1617854 26-Aug-2016 13:25
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MikeB4:

chevrolux:


Telepermit aside.... I just wouldn't want my business relying on $10 modems out of China.


Sure the other manufacturers have factories there, but they also have very high quality control ie Apple. That's what you are paying for. And sure, NZ distributors are putting a markup on the kit. But we all have to make a bit of money somewhere.


If an ADSL modem is all you need, Snappernet still have the Draytek 120 available very cheap.



 


why there is nothing wrong with the big brand Chinese products such as Huawei. Large chunks of the internet in NZ is driven by Huawei equipment and there have been some large enterprise installs in NZ. EG Agile network for Lincoln University.


With respect you need to ignore the FUD being generated from some sources.



Because Huawei have the time, money and resources to make sure the equipment is designed well enough to stand up to other nz regulations such as the CGA. There's a lot of rules to follow and for very good reasons.




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  Reply # 1617869 26-Aug-2016 13:46
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Yep Huawei has good gear - lots of the NZ UFB network is running it. Doesn't change my stance though - Huawei isn't rock bottom chinese pricing.

 

My recommendations come from installing IT equipment for small businesses where we sign them of a 5 year lease - hence using something I know I can leave there for 5 years and not replace it every time there is a power cut.


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  Reply # 1617909 26-Aug-2016 14:34
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I'm pretty sure @RSMNZ will have something to say about importation of NON Type Approved / Telepermitted product. 

 

Its not worth the fines that RSM hand out. Like everyone has said here keep with brands that are already in the country and that are approved for use on the networks.


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  Reply # 1617916 26-Aug-2016 14:52
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techrebel:

 

Im going to test one and just so that you guys are aware.. Do you guys know where the local suppliers get their hardware from.. it is China.

 

All of them are made there. The local suppliers make huge amount of margin on those.

 

 

You still haven't explained what the purpose of imprting hardware is, or what the requirements are. One assumes because you want to import the hardware you want the cheapest option there is. Why go with unproven technology when you can buy a perfectly functional TP-Link ADSL2+ WiFi router for $49 retail and get a rock solid product?

 

If you think local suppliers are making huge margin you'll be disappointed to know that's not the case. There isn't a lot of money to be made as a distributor on a product that's a little over NZ$30 wholesale from the distributor.

 

You're literally going to be saving maybe $10 to buy an unproven product from China that won't necessarily have type approval to be used in NZ, will likely have plugpacks that aren't AS/NZ approved (Chinese use the same power pins but don't require shielding) and doesn't have a Telepermit. That seems crazy.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1617927 26-Aug-2016 15:18
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Taubin: Probably a stupid question, but I've not heard of the telepermit before. If I were to import a Ubiquiti ERL-3 from Amazon because it's a bunch cheaper than buying one here, would that be covered since they are on offer here? Or would there be issues with bringing one in that way? I'm assuming since they are in fact sold here, they have the permit, however I'm not sure if they use special firmware or something to be sold here.

 

I'm not familiar with that device, but essentially anything that connects directly to the copper network needs a Telepermit. A quick search for that device seems to indicate that it's a pure Ethernet device; if you're not connecting it to a phone line then it doesn't need a Telepermit.

 

If it does connect to the phone line then I'd suggest using a local model; foreign ones may have different firmware etc.


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