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webwat
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  #120944 4-Apr-2008 00:34
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Cyril, are you suggesting he patch the 110 connectors directly to the RJ45 sockets on the patch? I would prefer to do 110 to 110 (connect to spare ports via the back of the patch panel then patch those RJ45 to the house RJ45 ports) — that gives you choice of patching whichever phone lines you like between the house cabling and those spare ports we have just used, although its just the initial 8 house lines for now.

So yeah 16 ports could be used on the patch panel to supply 8 phone lines, but WHICH phone lines would be much easier to change on demand without any tools. The unfiltered ADSL line could be wired to the 17th port to allow ADSL modem sitting outside next to the patch instead of inside the hole, and that means its easy to cover the hole up. Covering the hole should prevent curious people from "fixing" phone wires that werent broken, possibly damaging the 110 connectors by using pocketknife etc without telling the boss man.

Still need to tie down that power cable after final location confirmed...

Sorry for delay, but eventually I did take some holiday! Laughing




Time to find a new industry!


webwat
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  #120947 4-Apr-2008 00:40
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Sorry forgot. Use a tiedown cable to mount the splitter to back of the box in the wall, and if you decide to cover that hole you might need a tiny shelf outside near the switch to sit the modem on.

Sounds like you are just about there anyway.




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sbiddle
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  #120962 4-Apr-2008 07:59
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webwat: Cyril, are you suggesting he patch the 110 connectors directly to the RJ45 sockets on the patch? I would prefer to do 110 to 110 (connect to spare ports via the back of the patch panel then patch those RJ45 to the house RJ45 ports) — that gives you choice of patching whichever phone lines you like between the house cabling and those spare ports we have just used, although its just the initial 8 house lines for now.


Why waste time (and cabling) going from 110 -> 110 and then RJ45 -> RJ45 when your can just go from 110 -> RJ45? The whole point of having the phone distribution module is to go straight from the 110's on it direct to a patched jackpoint which saves having phone ports on the patch panel and (potentially) giving you another 4 or more free ports on the patch panel.

I've never actually used one of these Signet phone modules in the installs I've done for people but have installed one in the past and had a good play with it. I just install a BT socket on the wall which I then typically jumper to the last 4 ports on the patch panel and then use 4 RJ45's to patch the voice portion.

Cyril7 has gone one better and designed a module of his own that will fit in a regular faceplate and has a test point, ADSL filter and alarm outputs and RJ45 sockets on the front which means you can patch this straight to your panel.

cyril7
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  #120963 4-Apr-2008 08:19
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Cyril, are you suggesting he patch the 110 connectors directly to the RJ45 sockets on the patch?


Hi Webwat, normally I do just as you suggest and parallel up 4-5spare jacks on the patch panel with the filtered line, or I use one of my panels which has 5 RJ45 jacks to provide phone patching.

The idea of these signet phone panels that theKiwi has used is that you use it to provide the phone source rather than using up patch panel jacks which is important when you only have a 8jack panel as most of these small inwall systems have. When using this type of phone distribution panels you can patch in one of two ways, either as I normally do make up some patch leads with a RJ45 plug on one end and punch the blue pair of the other end to the phone panel, or use a 110 patch jack that signet sell (and provide if you buy as a kit) these are quite neat, they have a RJ45 plug one end, and a pair of gold plated blades in a plastic body on the other than you push into the 110 IDC header no tools required, they can be plugged in and out multiple times.

By the way I noted a pdf from signet the other day as a suggestion to use there phone panel with a central dsl filter. They suggested that you punch the inbound line to a normally not used phone pair on the panel, say the orange pair, connect the filter to the orange pair of one of the 110 distribution headers, and the output of the filter back to the blue input 110 of the phone panel. The security jack will now be available via the now filtered blue pair as usual, and your DSL modem can be connected to the prefilted orange line.

Cyril

webwat
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  #121910 7-Apr-2008 21:31
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Ok, so those signet things are not PBX systems... Sounds like dont need those 8 connectors or the signet itself at all, using a single wire punched into your 8 (or more) spare ports on the patch together with a BT test and/or adsl jack would have the same result. But if the signet has lots of functions then yeah patch it all to the front of the panel or alternatively throw away the panel and use lots of solid pugs on end of your building cables. Personally i think its nicer to do a proper structured cabling job, make it all look professional. To be really professional you could terminate the spare wires from the phone cables on the patch as well, probably green/orange for yet more 100base ethernet and brown for the extra phone, giving you the option to upgrade to extra phones ethernet later without even touching the signet board. Of course we just want to get it working and look a bit tidy so dont worry too much.

If this doesnt make sense, a rather inaccurate quantity of vodka may have impaired my judgement. Despite such unknown factors, please ensure "the boss" doesnt change planned requirements on you half way through the project. The longer you leave things hanging out of the wall, the higher the chance of somebody demanding an extra jackpoint in some odd place or blaming you for not supporting an unexpected fax machine that arrives out of the blue. Or one of those internet connected fridges that email you when you need more cheese.

Well I think you have all the options there now!!




Time to find a new industry!


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