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# 214408 10-May-2017 09:23
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I have a Unifi WIFI set up at home with 3 x 2.4GHz APs. I am looking at upgrading to UAP-Pro routers to make use of the 5GHz spectrum.

 

Prices for the access points are considerably cheaper on Ebay where majority of the access points are shipped from the US.

 

Before I start bargain hunting I wanted to know if there was any difference in channels and frequencies used in the US vs what we use here in NZ and if purchasing an AP from the US is a mistake?


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  # 1778933 10-May-2017 09:32
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Most WiFi gear sold in the US has limited 5GHz use due to the allowed bands over there bring different to here. Outdoor UBNT products have this limitation and can only be unlocked by code. I am unsure as to whether UniFi AP's have hardware limitations, or will use the full 5GHz band when the country is set to NZ.

 

 




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  # 1778940 10-May-2017 09:48
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sbiddle:

 

Most WiFi gear sold in the US has limited 5GHz use due to the allowed bands over there bring different to here. Outdoor UBNT products have this limitation and can only be unlocked by code. I am unsure as to whether UniFi AP's have hardware limitations, or will use the full 5GHz band when the country is set to NZ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for leading me down this road. I did some investigating and came across this post from a UBNT employee: https://community.ubnt.com/t5/UniFi-Wireless/Unifi-AP-US-version-in-Europe-will-it-work/m-p/196137/highlight/true#M5473

 

There doesn't seem to be a whole lot of information out there but according to this comment the restriction is baked into the hardware and is not by-passable by changing the country code in the Unifi Controller.

 

I am going to avoid purchasing a US version for now.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1779230 10-May-2017 18:44
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In the US the governing regulatory body, the FCC, does not allow "World Mode" access points (access points where the country code can be changed) to be sold in the US.  Access points in the US are called "FCC Mode" access points and are locked to US channels and transmit powers.  "FCC Mode" access points should not be imported into New Zealand as they cannot be configured to comply with New Zealand regulatory requirements.


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  # 1779235 10-May-2017 18:48
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If buying from overseas, just make sure you keep the frequency away from one the Metservice Radar uses (5605mhz) else RSM will come looking for you


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  # 1781981 14-May-2017 16:29
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I have an unused Unifi AC HD available, their top model. Currently surplus to requirements, it's never been out of the box. PM if you're interested.




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  # 1781983 14-May-2017 16:35
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IME with trying to use the middle 5GHz channels, they are worthless. Only my samsung phones will attach to them, LG speakers, TV, several cheap dual band USB sticks, cheap tablet PCs, windows 10 based STBs, will all not connect to the DFS channels.

 

I had all the AC ones nicely spaced out across the whole band when looking in wifi manager on my phone, Totally useless for most of my gear.

 

If you are a business and have control over all the gear on it and know for a fact they will use DFS channels, then perhaps you can get some benefit by setting APs on those channels, but otherwise they are useless. All IMO of course





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  # 1782132 14-May-2017 21:41
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For residential use you don't need the DFS channels as you have eight non-DFS channels to play with (the four UNII-1 channels and the four UNII-3 channels).

 

Even if you want to deploy 80 MHz wide channels that still gives you two channels to play with.


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