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665 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1924111 23-Dec-2017 15:18
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richms:

I got this one which also has the better than nothing blinking light cable tester in it as well - https://www.aliexpress.com/item/High-Quality-RJ11-RJ45-Cat5-Cat6-Telephone-Wire-Tracker-Tracer-Toner-Ethernet-LAN-Network-Cable-Tester/32810274460.html and its great for finding wires.



Yep, that's the equipment



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Geek
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  Reply # 1924116 23-Dec-2017 15:24
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Thanks


 
 
 
 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1924119 23-Dec-2017 15:34
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Clicking the "plus 1" button is always appreciated

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1924137 23-Dec-2017 16:25
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It's fine tracing the cables but you really do need a professional in to finish the job (if somebody isn't planning to come back). The data cables should ideally be punched down to a frame rather than just left as they are and terminated with a RJ45 socket. Likewise assuming you're in a Freeview UHF area you'll have no TV reception until somebody terminates those and puts a splitter in.




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  Reply # 1924190 23-Dec-2017 16:33
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Thanks, alternatively is is not somthing i could research and complete myself ?

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  Reply # 1924203 23-Dec-2017 17:25
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ermat: Thanks, alternatively is is not somthing i could research and complete myself ?

 

You could do, but you're going to need to invest in specialised tools just to be able to do it. If you've never punched down cable to a frame before it's safe to say you will do it incorrectly unless you have somebody giving advice as there are certainly tricks to doing it correctly and important aspects that need to be maintained to ensure proper performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1924205 23-Dec-2017 17:32
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It will take a good bit of specialized equipment, that you'll likely never use again.

But it's always good to pick up a new skill.

The network cables will require RJ45 boxes, with female ports, and some Cat6 patch cables.

The coaxial cable is typically given a male end, which is debatably better, since every connection reduces signal quality.

I would suggest not trying to put a gaming console in your wiring closet, unless you get a Cat6 to USB extender, and run a wire to your game controller.


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1924223 23-Dec-2017 18:24
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sbiddle:

 

The only problem is (and it's the same problem in pretty much every new build is that leaving the router inside the cabinet if the worse place for it. The metal kills the WiFi, so if you live in a larger sized house you won't get good WiFi coverage.

 

 

 

 

Yeah it's mindboggling, lets smart wire a home and then not even put a switch in and leave the modem in the far corner of the house in a tiny metal box.


Hmm, what to write...
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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1924853 25-Dec-2017 09:42
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ermat: Thanks, alternatively is is not somthing i could research and complete myself ?

You will need:
A clip in patch panel Cat5e or Cat6
A 110 termination tool
A cyclops stripper...or skill
A good pair of diagonal cutters
It looks like all the cables are labeled so you won’t need a tone source , just a multimeter will do for such a small job anyway
A cable tester
And this is important....my advice is get some help from someone who has done it before

For the TV you should get a small powered amplifier that has about 5 ports.
And get someone to help you that owns the tools to do the job.

You will learn far more this way

Good luck




Matthew


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  Reply # 1924928 25-Dec-2017 11:38
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loceff13:

Yeah it's mindboggling, lets smart wire a home and then not even put a switch in and leave the modem in the far corner of the house in a tiny metal box.



Part of the problem is router manufacturers not making a supported Ethernet only router with separate WiFi AP, connected via Ethernet. As a matched kit.

Surely NZ is not the only country where a single all in 1 modem/router/WiFi AP often doesn't provide sufficient coverage.

But with those home distributor cabinets, at a minimum you have to buy a separate switch to both get reasonable WiFi, and to actually get all of the Ethernet ports providing internet. And preferably buy a couple of dedicated APs as well.







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  Reply # 1924989 25-Dec-2017 15:04
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Thanks for the replys. I now have a better idea of whats required.

What is the configuration of a typical clip in patch ? I assume it is like a bus bar with one feed and multiple lines out but i really have no idea yet.

Merry Christmas

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1925020 25-Dec-2017 17:32
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  Reply # 1925022 25-Dec-2017 17:34
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sbiddle:

 

I guess it also depends what you actually want to do. If you live in an average sized house you'll have a perfectly functional broadband connection right now using WiFi only.

 

All the data cables need to be punched down to a frame and the RG6 terminated and put onto a splitter. If you want Ethernet to outlets you simply need to patch these from the router to the frame once it's installed. 

 

The only problem is (and it's the same problem in pretty much every new build is that leaving the router inside the cabinet if the worse place for it. The metal kills the WiFi, so if you live in a larger sized house you won't get good WiFi coverage.

 

 

 

 

If there is an ethernet cable running from a phone jack into that patch panel could the phone jack not be converted into an RJ45 outlet and the router be plugged into there?


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  Reply # 1925097 25-Dec-2017 21:22
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ermat:

What is the configuration of a typical clip in patch ? I assume it is like a bus bar with one feed and multiple lines out but i really have no idea yet.

 

not in the slightest

 

each port is one line in one out

 

Wall jack in room > Cat5/6 cable in wall > Cable sticking out in your panel > Patch panel (connected as mentioned above) > Patch Cable > Router/Switch > Optical Network Terminal > ONT

 

for each port you want connected to the net you will need one a port on a switch or router to allow the connection.

 

kinda like this except the one goes were the DSL in is :)

 

http://www.trical.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/SIGNET-ST2206-Wiring-Set-up.pdf


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1925131 26-Dec-2017 00:20
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ermat: Thanks for the replys. I now have a better idea of whats required.

What is the configuration of a typical clip in patch ? I assume it is like a bus bar with one feed and multiple lines out but i really have no idea yet.

Merry Christmas

 

Ho ho ho.

 

Yes, that's correct but only in logical terms.

 

Electrically each network cable runs from a remote end to the patch panel where it terminates. At this point you plug (i.e. patch with short cables)any or each remote end into a switch to join them all together together with a a feed from your broadband modem.

 

Simples.


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