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235 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 230746 11-Mar-2018 18:57
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We're having a new house built (double storey). Would it make sense to have an RJ45 wall plate downstairs and upstairs. And then a router at each RJ45 wall plate?
This would work like an access point, right?
Will it reduce the internet speed?
From what I understand, power lines reduces the speed by quite a bit, so I thought it would make sense to do the two router as access point option instead.
Any input is very welcome.

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347 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1972773 11-Mar-2018 19:01
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depends on where your data panel is, but it would be good to plan for what you have described.  or have the router in the panel and 2 access points at the other end

 

 




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972779 11-Mar-2018 19:11
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Thanks.
How does it work with placement of data panel? Is that decided by Chorus or can we tell where we would like it?
Also, as our new house is on the same address as the existing house (ground not sub-divided), can we still ask Chorus to install another fibre connection, as the old house still exists (and the old house already has fibre)

 
 
 
 


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235 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972782 11-Mar-2018 19:15
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I guess I can ask Chorus about some of these questions

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1972787 11-Mar-2018 19:31
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Ideally (if budget allows), some sort of structured cabling system. Very briefly, RJ45 network outlets all over the place, cabled back a single central location, where there is power and the incoming comms connection (fibre / xDSL / cable). Don't get a sparky to do this unless they are experienced in data cabling.

 

As for WiFi, don't use 2 routers, use access points. Routers, well, route and access points provide WiFi. Using a router as an AP is always messy.

 

One router on the network to go between the internal and external networks, then access points wherever needed for sufficient coverage.

 

EDIT: If budget doesn't allow, then your idea of a couple of outlets cabled back to a central location is also good.


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  Reply # 1972795 11-Mar-2018 19:35
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As above - using multiple routers is just messy. Do it properly the first time and use access points (either UniFi or Grandstream are great options). A little more expensive however things will just work better.







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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972819 11-Mar-2018 20:13
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OK, so let's say I've got the fibre box and router downstairs in the living room. As I've got an Android TV box, I would like this hard-wired to the router. That's obviously easy, just by using a CAT6 cable between router and Android TV box. I would then really only need a wireless access point (like Ubiquity) upstairs, right? And that would have to be plugged in to an RJ45 wall outlet, right? I would need power too, yes? I understand that it comes with a PoE adapter.
But what if I would like to hard-wire an Android TV box upstairs too? Can I use the same RJ45 outlet for both TV box and the Ubiquity? Does a splitter exist?
Sorry, might be silly questions, but I don't know too much about networking.

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972822 11-Mar-2018 20:27
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danepak: 

 

I would then really only need a wireless access point (like Ubiquity) upstairs, right? And that would have to be plugged in to an RJ45 wall outlet, right? I

 

 

The wireless components in most residential routers are rubbish and under perform.  I would recommend using the router as a router and access points for wireless access.  Therefore you need at least two access points - one for ground level and one for the upper level.

 

danepak:

 

would need power too, yes? I understand that it comes with a PoE adapter.

 

 

As it is extremely unlikely your residential router can provide PoE power you will need PoE injectors to power the access points.

 

 


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  Reply # 1972834 11-Mar-2018 20:47
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@danepak, that would work, but it may be limiting if you want to change things in the future. If you put a network switch upstairs, multiple devices can share the single connection back to downstairs, but remember they are all sharing the bandwidth of a single connection then.

 

Best practice would be a separate outlet for each device though.

 

Perhaps a compromise - cat6 solid cable isn't expensive - grab a box and put lots of runs of cable from a central location out to various point around the house. Leave at least a meter or so slack at each end, and make a note of where they all are (if sealed up). The expensive part of structured cabling is having it all terminated with outlets and a patch panel - just do the ones you need initially, but you have future proofed if you need to change things later.


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972837 11-Mar-2018 20:50
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Dumb question time - When they install the UFB in a house will they do runs of cat6 or do you have to gt someone else in to do them?


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  Reply # 1972854 11-Mar-2018 21:18
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@danepak use 2x access points - one upstairs and one down. The Android TV box should work flawlessly over WiFi (it is all I do with the Shield TV here).

 

@Bananabob No cat6 is run - just fibre to the ONT and the ONT installed, the rest is your responsibility.





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  Reply # 1972861 11-Mar-2018 21:30
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Bananabob:

 

Dumb question time - When they install the UFB in a house will they do runs of cat6 or do you have to gt someone else in to do them?

 

 

When you get fiber they run fiber to the little "fiber modem" (it's not really called that), the router sites beside it, anything else is your problem.





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235 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972897 11-Mar-2018 23:31
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michaelmurfy:

 

@danepak use 2x access points - one upstairs and one down. The Android TV box should work flawlessly over WiFi (it is all I do with the Shield TV here).

 

 

@michaelmurfy - If I really really do want the Android box connected via cable, would it work, if I had a small switch?

 

And what if the switch was a PoE switch? Would it then provide power to the two access points (I would then not have to use the PoE injectors)?

 

I've seen you can get a small 5-port switch, where two of them are PoE.

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SWHNGR2709157/NETGEAR-ProSAFE-GS105PE-5-Port-Gigabit-Web-Managed

 

 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1972900 11-Mar-2018 23:36
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danepak:

 

If I really really do want the Android box connected via cable, would it work, if I had a small switch?

 

Yes.

 

And what if the switch was a PoE switch? Would it then provide power to the two access points (I would then not have to use the PoE injectors)?

 

Yes. And right, you don't need additional PoE injectors.

 

I've seen you can get a small 5-port switch, where two of them are PoE.

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SWHNGR2709157/NETGEAR-ProSAFE-GS105PE-5-Port-Gigabit-Web-Managed

 

 

Try to get one with all links as PoE, you'll be more flexible with other stuff later on too and it cost not much more.

 

edit: https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SWHTPL1001/TP-Link-TL-SG108PE-8-Port-Gigabit-Easy-Smart-Switc

 

(remark: with the additional PoE links, you could supply different things with PoE/5V-2.4A or 12V/1..2A splitter. i.e. I remotely supply a (German) ONT with 12V/1A by UPS in a power shortage. This true for the router and APs (or Android box) as well so in your case, we have then already 4 PoE power sinks and only ONE single power supply adapter with his losses).

 

To prevent incompatibilities, be sure all PoE equipment follows the IEEE 802.3af (or better 802.3at) standard.





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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1972902 11-Mar-2018 23:40
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Tinkerisk:

 

danepak:

 

If I really really do want the Android box connected via cable, would it work, if I had a small switch?

 

Yes.

 

And what if the switch was a PoE switch? Would it then provide power to the two access points (I would then not have to use the PoE injectors)?

 

Yes. And right, you don't need additional PoE injectors.

 

I've seen you can get a small 5-port switch, where two of them are PoE.

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SWHNGR2709157/NETGEAR-ProSAFE-GS105PE-5-Port-Gigabit-Web-Managed

 

 

Try to get one with all links as PoE, you'll be more flexible with other stuff later on too and it cost not much more.

 

 

OK, thanks


Meow
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  Reply # 1972903 11-Mar-2018 23:40
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Yep it'll be fine. The Ubiquiti AP's come with PoE injectors which are fine for most people - I wouldn't bother spending the extra coin getting a PoE switch for just a couple of things. Just bare in mind that switch requires PoE in also to power it.

 

You could always run a single Cat6 cable upstairs and have a switch powering everything however just remember this means you've only got a Gigabit of total bandwidth to downstairs (if you had a NAS or something). I'd always recommend running dedicated Cat6 to the AP.





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