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5 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 240285 30-Aug-2018 20:27
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I am new to home networking.

 

I have already connected 2 pcs (wired) and a laptop and a 9" tablet (wirelessly) to a hg659b modem supplied by vodafone in my house.

 

I have several pcs (networked together) out in the workshop which is about 15-18mts away from my modem (as the crow flys).

 

I am considering two options for connecting the "workshop" to the "house".

 

Firstly, connect the "workshop" pcs via cable to an rta1025wv6 setup as a wap and have the hg659b 'look' for the rta1025w. I am using an rta1025w as it is what is available at the present moment.

 

Secondly, put in a wireless ethernet card into one of the "workshop" pcs and then networking the other "workshop" pcs to it. Then have the hg659b wirelessly connect to the "workshop" pc with the wireless ethernet card.

 

Unfortunately connecting the "workshop" to the "house" via a cable is not an option.

 

Any help (or criticism) would be greatly appreciated.

 

TIA


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  Reply # 2081662 30-Aug-2018 20:40
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If the workshop on the same phase as the house, then powerline adapters (ethernet over power) may work to get a connection out there.




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2081667 30-Aug-2018 20:48
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If the workshop on the same phase as the house, then powerline adapters (ethernet over power) may work to get a connection out there.

 

Thank you for the prompt answer.

 

I have considered this option but at the moment purchasing new equipment is not an option as I have a wife that needs 'her' house renovated so my hobbies are on the back burner financially.


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  Reply # 2081689 30-Aug-2018 22:12
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emq978:

 

If the workshop on the same phase as the house, then powerline adapters (ethernet over power) may work to get a connection out there.

 

Thank you for the prompt answer.

 

I have considered this option but at the moment purchasing new equipment is not an option as I have a wife that needs 'her' house renovated so my hobbies are on the back burner financially.

 

 

Will you be taking gib off the walls, etc? possible to run a cable between workshop and house?





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  Reply # 2081754 31-Aug-2018 07:13
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The hg659 is your main router, it's not going to take the changes required to actively connect to the workshop access point and still work as your wifi router.

Your main router gets left to do it's job, it doesn't go looking for devices to connect to, everything else has to connect to it.

You want to configure the workshop access point to connect to the hg659 wifi if that's possible. Not sure of the proper term but it may be bridge mode.
Then the workshop stuff connects via ethernet to the workshop access point.

Otherwise option 2 might work but it requires that the wireless PC be on whenever any device in the workshop needs internet.




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  Reply # 2081774 31-Aug-2018 09:10
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You need to check if the rta1025 supports WiFi client mode. Which stops it from broadcasting its own WiFi, and instead connect to an existing WiFi network. (the HG659 network)

If one of the workshop computers has a WiFi adaptor, connect it to the HG659 then bridge the WiFi and Ethernet adaptors together on that computer.





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  Reply # 2081793 31-Aug-2018 09:51
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1st thing to do is see if the wifi signal from the house is usuable & reliable in the workshop .
If it isnt, forget any sort of wifi link house<=>workshop (unless you want to spend money to make it usuable)

 

with a phone or laptop, run one of the many wifi signal check app's from the workshop.
Poor signal means look for other options , either spend $ or run cable , unfortunately both allready ruled out :-)

 

Powerline kits can be bought cheap on trademe if you arnt in a hurry & can wait for a bargain




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2084439 5-Sep-2018 16:53
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I have done a bit of work on this project in the preceding 3 or 4 days so I thought I would completely rewrite my initial post c/w all the new information.

I have built and am using a home network. It consists of a Huawei hg659b router/modem supplied by Vodafone, New Zealand, 2 desktop computers (complete with printers) in a wired network and a laptop and a 9" tablet connected wirelessly. The details of the hardware in the home network are as follows: Acer all-in-one using an AMD E1-2500 APU with 4Gb RAM and a Dell 2400 Dimension using 2.4Ghz CPU with 2Gb RAM. The printers are both monochrome laser printers. HP laptop with similar hardware as the Acer all-in-one.
Now I have started to build a wired network in my workshop. At the moment it has 3 desktop computers but I am planning on making it larger (up to 4 more desktop computers). All the pcs in the workshop are using 2.4GHz or 2.8Ghz CPUs with 2Gb or 4Gb RAM.

The possibility of connecting the two networks together is appealing.

Connecting the "house" network to the "workshop" network via a cable is not possible. I do not have access for the cable either overhead or underground. Power line adapters also are not an option.

Now here is where I am running into problems.

As I see it I have two options:

Firstly, put a wireless ethernet card in one of the "workshop" pcs and network everything else to that. I don't mind leaving this pc on all the time as it will also be used as a hardware testbed machine.
The problem with that idea is that the HG659b signal received in the "workshop" is about -90db, as measured by an android mounted wifi signal meter. This probably is not strong enough for a viable connection but I am willing to be corrected on that point.

Secondly, use a modem as an AP.
At the moment I am looking at this option as the level of signal received from the HG659b
should be large enough for the WAP to work. Again pl ease correct me if I am wrong.
I am using an Rta1025w modem at the moment but I have a Netcomm NB6Plus4 which I might use if the Rta1025w does not work sufficiently well.
Outside the workshop the signal increases to about -60db or -50db. So with that information I am looking at using the rta1025w with a directional reflector fitted. I am prepared to mount the RTA1025w outside the wall of the workshop (out of the weather) to improve the 'received' signal strength. When I am back inside the house the wifi meter 'sees' the Rta1025w quite well (as it is still set up as a modem).

What I want to do is set it up as an AP. I have been told that this is also called wifi client mode. (Thank you Aredwood.)
How do I do that?

I am assuming that i will need to connect the rta to a pc and phone line and change its settings online but can I do that using a pc that is already networked using the hg659b. In other words will using the pc with the second modem (RTA1025w) corrupt the settings (stored in the pc) of the first modem or do I need to use a third pc for the RTA1025w.

Any help (or criticism) would be greatly appreciated.

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  Reply # 2084443 5-Sep-2018 17:06
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I don't believe the 1025w will do what you want, and even if it did, performance would be awful as it's only wireless-g. 

 

The Netcomm wouldn't be much better, and I don't think that supports client mode either. 

I'd seriously re-look at the powerline adapter option as it's almost certainly the cheapest and most reliable option for you in this situation (assuming the wiring allows this - why is it that they aren't an option?)

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/NETTPL0411/TP-Link-TL-PA411-KIT-AV500-Powerline-Kit-500Mbps30

 

If that's out of the question, the only other option cheapish option I can think of would be to use something like a Ubiquiti NanoBeam (non-ac though) in client mode, connected to a switch in the garage. But that is still more expensive than a powerline kit and probably will perform worse. 

 

 

 

A point to point wireless link with a pair or NanoBeam AC radios would work very well, but this is starting to get costly, especially for such a short link. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2084531 5-Sep-2018 20:08
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Thank you wratterus for your reply. As a late breaking update to this question I have just been given a SHG1500.
The specs show this:
adsl2+ and fibre router wifi certified 802.11 b/g/n
3 10/100 ethernet ports and 1 1 gigabit port
plus 3 usb ports.
From what you said in your reply and what i have just typed above I am assuming that the 1500 will probably be good enough for what I need.
I will be connecting it into the workshop network tomorrow morning and seeing the results hopefully. I will post results here tomorrow.

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  Reply # 2084540 5-Sep-2018 20:31
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In my experience, few domestic modem/routers will work as a wifi client and do what you're trying to achieve.

 

Seriously, I think you need to spend the $50 on a pair of powerline adapters and stop trying to cludge a solution using wifi


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  Reply # 2084548 5-Sep-2018 20:53
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It appears the new one might work with openwrt or ddwrt.
This might allow you to configure client mode for the wifi, but it may not be simple.




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  Reply # 2084551 5-Sep-2018 21:02
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Cheapest solution would be to get a used wifi extender with an ethernet port from someone selling them off cheap after finding the promises of the sales person were all lies and it didnt help them. That will connect to the house wifi, and then provide its own wifi network and also allow devices on the wired port to get internet.

 

They are slow, dont work with many broadcast protocols like casting and air play and slow the network down for everyone. Hence why people will let them go for a steal.

 

ADSL routers almost never seem to have any client or bridging options on them, as people will turn them on, find they break things or dont do what they expected and then give the device 1 star reviews because they do not know what they are doing. Some ethernet routers will do it, but as the trend now is to proper mesh rather than bodgey wifi extending methods they are going away, other than asus with their new ai mesh firmwares.

 

I wouldnt bother trying powerlines unless you have very old wiring with no RCDs, since those seem to completely stop the powerline signals, and as you are renovating that should be getting upgraded in the process if they are so old.





Richard rich.ms



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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2084669 6-Sep-2018 07:19
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Thanks for all the replies. I will be doing some work on the network today and I will report back to the forum with my results.

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  Reply # 2084752 6-Sep-2018 10:17
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It sounds like you would need to buy a wireless card for option 1 above. Option 1 is a bit of a pain. Save your money and spend it on a proper solution instead such as the link power line or a point to point router that does what you need. I've bridged wired to wireless connections in windows and it can be a muck around to get it working right, and is never 100% satisfactory.

 

Option 2 requires a router with client mode which is fairly common in profession gear but uncommon in consumer grade gear, so I doubt either of your spare AP's will be useful to you. Generally speaking AP's are not designed to connect to one another. Some units have network repeater mode and bridge modes and various mesh modes, but the older units with this feature tended be proprietary and didn't play nicely with other brands.

 

 

 

 


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