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mdf



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Topic # 243758 30-Dec-2018 14:54
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I need a short run of ethernet cable outside - around 3m. I've got a reel of standard indoor cat 6 solid core ethernet, and some outdoor rated conduit. Am I okay using indoor cat 6 outside in conduit, or should I really go buy some externally-rated ethernet?

 

Is the difference between internal and external ethernet just UV stabilisers in the external sheath, or are the internals different too (maybe tinned or greased strands?).


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'That VDSL Cat'
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  Reply # 2152256 30-Dec-2018 14:58
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it's only the REALLLY high end stuff that tends to be greased, that's a pain in the rear to  work with!

 

 

 

I have some cat5e outdoor grade Toughcable Carrier grade here.

 

It's just got a ground wire in it, separators like cat6a and shielding layers - Honestly i suspect it's not really built to cat5e standards.. (it's honestly a pain to perfectly terminate)

 

 

 

The only real difference in the outter layer there is the UV protection. Normal cat5 is "OK" but in the sun it starts to crack and become brittle over time and that's where the issues come from.

 

 

 

Depending on where your putting it grounding and water loops are pretty important, otherwise one or the other will eventually fry things.. 





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mdf



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  Reply # 2152259 30-Dec-2018 15:08
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Hmm, "water loops" is a new concept for me.

 

I'm just adding an outdoor POE camera. There's an existing hole in a wall that is convenient for the indoor bit of the cabling, but is a little under 3m away from where the camera is going. I just need to bridge that gap. 

 

I've never used greased ethernet, but have used greased coax. I hate that stuff so can only imagine the nightmare of 8 individual greased wires to punch down.


 
 
 
 


'That VDSL Cat'
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  Reply # 2152261 30-Dec-2018 15:11
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mdf:

 

Hmm, "water loops" is a new concept for me.

 

I'm just adding an outdoor POE camera. There's an existing hole in a wall that is convenient for the indoor bit of the cabling, but is a little under 3m away from where the camera is going. I just need to bridge that gap. 

 

I've never used greased ethernet, but have used greased coax. I hate that stuff so can only imagine the nightmare of 8 individual greased wires to punch down.

 

 

If it's under the eves, you may be able to get away with it, but it's one of those things... do it once do it right?

 

 

 

water loop, drip loop essentially just an extra little bit to send the water away from your holes ;)

 

Image result for ethernet cable water loop





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  Reply # 2152289 30-Dec-2018 15:22
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Cheers! I had no idea that is what it was called!

 

If I ran ethernet in conduit, do I need a hole at the bottom of the drip loop for drainage? Nothing should get in, but if it did, it would be there forever without a hole.


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  Reply # 2152290 30-Dec-2018 15:23
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mdf:

 

Cheers! I had no idea that is what it was called!

 

If I ran ethernet in conduit, do I need a hole at the bottom of the drip loop for drainage? Nothing should get in, but if it did, it would be there forever without a hole.

 

 

no, it's just the loop in the cable so water runs down not up it.





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  Reply # 2152315 30-Dec-2018 15:47
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For 3m of cable at home, indoor stuff is totally fine. It's going to probably outlast you at being the house if it's in a conduit.

 

You don't necessarily need a drip loop, but just think about where the cable end is located, if it's exposed it might get wet and water will track down. But again, if this is at home, just drill the hole through the cladding at a "downward" angle (ie the outside hole is bit lower than the internal side) and then just a good helping of sealant inside will stop the minuscule amounts of water that might track back.

 

If this was going on an aerial pole, on an exposed wall, then I would certainly leave a drip loop. 


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  Reply # 2152316 30-Dec-2018 15:57
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I have some runs of blue cat5e that have been outside for 15+ years under somewhat cover but still exposed to sunlight for a few hours a day and they are fine still. Just had to pull it up and relocate its entry into the garage last year and it was still as flexible as new and no deterioration other than a slightly matt finish to the outer jacket.





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