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  Reply # 2162279 16-Jan-2019 20:31
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Maybe its the compression on the second image but it looks like the wires in the plugs are reversed.





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  Reply # 2162280 16-Jan-2019 20:36
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Ae Corumba!

 

Now this isnt the best example either, as it's a 2nd cabinet with the ont and router on the east wall.. long story.  

 

And total mis use of a patch panel board. But here's one with the phone module used (almost properly).

 

We were a special case where insurance would give you 6 outlets - like the old house pre-EQ, so added all the rest. Most rooms were pre-cabled by the sparky as analog using the distributor.

 

We ripped off the panels, added a 2-4 outlet and ran more cat5.. boom star network and some useless dedicated ports. But anyway

 

Traditionally they are used to jumper up to 8 outlets at once to the common phone line (which heads back to my routers analogue out). Here I use those, +1 to the outlet patch panel   The rest are patched switch to the outlets off to the walls as you expect via the panel.

 

  Click to see full size


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2162292 16-Jan-2019 20:49
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RunningMan:

darkasdes2: The cabinet when done properly should look like something similar to the photo on pg 23 of the tfc guidelines

https://www.tcf.org.nz/assets/guidelines/tcf-premises-wiring-cable-installers-guidelines-endorsed-oct-2015.pdf&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwjao8WP4vHfAhUaAXIKHaFGBf4QFjAEegQIBxAB&usg=AOvVaw2ScifPCiufVYK7tDTSfdWC


Link fixed https://www.tcf.org.nz/assets/guidelines/tcf-premises-wiring-cable-installers-guidelines-endorsed-oct-2015.pdf



Thanks

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  Reply # 2162297 16-Jan-2019 20:55
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The GE1 port of the ONT should be patched to Lounge Jack1, which is connected to the spark router. 

 

The LAN1 port of the spark router should be connected to Lounge Jack2 which goes back to the homehub.

In the home hub, a 16 port ethernet switch connects Lounge Jack2 to every other data jack in the house. 





Ray Taylor
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For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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  Reply # 2162702 17-Jan-2019 18:58
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Holy mother of god.. I'd actually throw these people out of the house and refuse to pay.. First one bad enough, but the "fix" is almost worse in some ways. 

 

These people are utterly incompetent.





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  Reply # 2162711 17-Jan-2019 19:23
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Lias:

 

Holy mother of god.. I'd actually throw these people out of the house and refuse to pay.. First one bad enough, but the "fix" is almost worse in some ways. 

 

These people are utterly incompetent.

 

 

What's wrong with the fix?

 

I would say totally sufficient considering the small amount of space available. And it will easily be re-patched in to a voice panel, or IR extender, or HDMI extender etc etc

 

We can all live in perfect worlds of have certified structured cabling permanent links, but the home is more often than not a perfect world. 

 

Edit: The only thing I would say REALLY lacking is some form of labeling.




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  Reply # 2162722 17-Jan-2019 19:41
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chevrolux:

 

Lias:

 

Holy mother of god.. I'd actually throw these people out of the house and refuse to pay.. First one bad enough, but the "fix" is almost worse in some ways. 

 

These people are utterly incompetent.

 

 

What's wrong with the fix?

 

I would say totally sufficient considering the small amount of space available. And it will easily be re-patched in to a voice panel, or IR extender, or HDMI extender etc etc

 

We can all live in perfect worlds of have certified structured cabling permanent links, but the home is more often than not a perfect world. 

 

Edit: The only thing I would say REALLY lacking is some form of labeling.

 

 

We did question a few times whether the box was large enough considering the number of cables going into it,  but they said the box was an adequate size. So the size of the box shouldn't be a limiting factor as to the quality of the install, as the box should have always been large enough.

 

I understand the wires though should be connected to a patch panel, and then patched to the switch.

 

I am not sure about labeling, as I think they were initially labelled on the wire, but that is something they would need to rectify. .

 

 


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  Reply # 2162740 17-Jan-2019 19:48
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There is no technical benefit to terminating on a patch panel though.

And if the expectation was patch panels the only real option is a 19" cabinet. Which in 99% of homes would just be unsightly and in the way for most people.

So I can understand the reasoning behind using this cabinet. Of course the other reasoning is 'well its sold at the wholesalers for home data installs so must be sweet'.



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  Reply # 2162741 17-Jan-2019 19:54
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chevrolux: There is no technical benefit to terminating on a patch panel though.

And if the expectation was patch panels the only real option is a 19" cabinet. Which in 99% of homes would just be unsightly and in the way for most people.

So I can understand the reasoning behind using this cabinet. Of course the other reasoning is 'well its sold at the wholesalers for home data installs so must be sweet'.

 

That isn't an issue as it is inside it's own large cupboard, so we did expect a largish cabinet to be installed. 

 

The thing is some of them are supposed to be for phone lines, so they are not all data, and they want to be able to pick which are for which.  The cabinet is also supposed to house the wifi modem which I understand shouldn't go into a metal cabinet, which this appears to be. It is specified to be installed as per the TCF Premises Wiring and Cable installers guidelines. 


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  Reply # 2162763 17-Jan-2019 21:03
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should never plan to put the wifi router in the cabinet in the first place. if you are going to just the the one device place it central and patch it back to the switches in the cabinet. this way you have good wifi where you need it.

 

the better solution is to run an access point or 2 around the house to give good coverage wverywhere.




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  Reply # 2162782 17-Jan-2019 21:32
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Jase2985:

 

should never plan to put the wifi router in the cabinet in the first place. if you are going to just the the one device place it central and patch it back to the switches in the cabinet. this way you have good wifi where you need it.

 

the better solution is to run an access point or 2 around the house to give good coverage wverywhere.

 

 

 

 

Yes that is what I suggested to them. But I imagine they would need a patch panel in the HDP to do that? 


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  Reply # 2162786 17-Jan-2019 21:36
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mattwnz:

 

Jase2985:

 

should never plan to put the wifi router in the cabinet in the first place. if you are going to just the the one device place it central and patch it back to the switches in the cabinet. this way you have good wifi where you need it.

 

the better solution is to run an access point or 2 around the house to give good coverage wverywhere.

 

 

 

 

Yes that is what I suggested to them. But I imagine they would need a patch panel to do that? 

 

 

Not necessarily, there is a method suggested earlier by using 2 of 4 wall outlets (you did add 2x as many as you thought at each point right..) behind the AV area as patchleads. Extending the location of the Router/wifi. 1 link from ONT to router (in other room), 1 link back to cabinet/switch. And any other APs can hang off the switch


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  Reply # 2162789 17-Jan-2019 21:40
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The way it's currently set up it can EASILY be re-patched in to a voice distribution module.

You could also EASILY re-patch an outlet in to a PoE injector to power a wireless access point.

Just to be clear, I'm not sticking up for this installer. But now that's its fitted off with RJ45's it's really not that terrible.

I would just want them to do continuity tests on all the outlets, and also label them.

Edit: if its actually supposed to be to TCF spec, then fair enough... Waaaaaaay off. But also, that TCF spec is relatively outdated nowadays IMO... there just isnt the need for that much RF distribution.

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  Reply # 2162806 17-Jan-2019 22:10
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chevrolux: There is no technical benefit to terminating on a patch panel though.

 

 

 

The cabling leaving the homehub is solid core. If it was terminated to an RJ45 socket, and used as a patch cable, the risk is that copper fatigue could cause problems over time with being moved etc. 

 

Where as by terminating it to a patch panel, the user then can use short patch cables which use stranded copper and dont suffer fatigue from movement, and are easily replaceable if they do get damaged - such as the locking tab from a plug being bent off. 

 

 

 

Personally I almost prefer that they just be terminated with plugs on the end of the cables because end users dont often go into homehubs and we recommend a light switch on the outside wall be used for power cycling rather than opening the home hub and fiddling with cables. 

 

The medium sized homehub cabinets are also never big enough once you get the equipment inside them so the patch panel just uses more space.  





Ray Taylor
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There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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  Reply # 2162809 17-Jan-2019 22:17
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In australia, it seems they are still daisy chaining telephone wiring and not really thinking about FTTH for the NBN. 

 

One example of bad electricians I have is a guy that recently returned to NZ after a 10 year stint in australia said "thats how they do it on the NBN for futureproofing" 
The guy was a subcontractor to a home building company which did the fit out of new houses, and reckoned he had the skills to do telephone and broadband for them too. 

The request from the customer was "I want data cabling to each telephone jack in the house"

 

The result was daisy chained telephone jacks using cat6 cable. 

 

No attic space so I ended up having to scotchlok 2 spare pairs via the 5 telephone jacks to get 100mbit ethernet data from one end of the house to the other for the alarm and second AP. Much cursing involved. 

 

 





Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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