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# 253142 29-Jul-2019 10:30
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With many fibre installations now replacing DSL/ADSL/VDSL copper systems, is the consumer now largely reliant on wifi for distribution around the house?

 

With DSL etc, each phone jack was essentially a network access point, but these become redundant as soon as fibre is installed.

 

So, is the user left with either wifi or cabling from a router to establish connections throughout a home?


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  # 2285084 29-Jul-2019 10:41
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Via a switch the same way it was done with xDSL

Nothing has really changed

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  # 2285085 29-Jul-2019 10:41
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Tounge firmly in cheek, 

 

 

 

I'm overprovisioning a bit because I'm tired of not having enough data drops, so every bedroom gets an 8-port keystone plate with four CAT5e's and four duplex OM4's.

 

Have a gander at this build in the U.S 

 

https://old.reddit.com/r/cableporn/comments/cimup1/sneak_peek_wip_power_and_data_in_my_new_lab_still/


 
 
 
 


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  # 2285092 29-Jul-2019 11:03
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Rickles: With many fibre installations now replacing DSL/ADSL/VDSL copper systems, is the consumer now largely reliant on wifi for distribution around the house?

 

With DSL etc, each phone jack was essentially a network access point, but these become redundant as soon as fibre is installed.

 

So, is the user left with either wifi or cabling from a router to establish connections throughout a home? 

 

From a very basic POV - fibre would terminate at the optical network terminal (ONT) inside your house and your modem/router would attach to this via an ethernet cable. Signal distribution from there can be via existing ethernet cable, new ethernet cable or wi-fi. So while your phone jacks won't be used anymore, you won't be reliant on wi-fi unless you either don't want to or can't have ethernet cabling installed.


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  # 2285093 29-Jul-2019 11:10
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Rickles:

 

With DSL etc, each phone jack was essentially a network access point, but these become redundant as soon as fibre is installed.

 

 

The old phone jack was never a means to distribute Ethernet. To get this to work, you need to rewire those phone jacks to a switch, which would be connected to the router. And that would be if you have CAT5e or better wires to those jacks, if you want GigE connectivity.

 

So, you can do the same thing with fibre. Connect those jacks to a switch, connected to the router, connected to the ONT.

 

 

 

 


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  # 2285094 29-Jul-2019 11:14
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Rickles:

 

With many fibre installations now replacing DSL/ADSL/VDSL copper systems, is the consumer now largely reliant on wifi for distribution around the house?

 

With DSL etc, each phone jack was essentially a network access point, but these become redundant as soon as fibre is installed.

 

So, is the user left with either wifi or cabling from a router to establish connections throughout a home?

 

 

It would depend - are the existing jacks RJ45 ? If so, it probably has a central distribution point somewhere, or at least is a lot easier to set one up and run it off a switch.

 

If they are the old RJ11/BT sockets, then yeah, most people put it into the too hard basket and just use wifi, unless youre happy to run cat5/6 yourself. 

 

Me, I was slightly lazy and rely on a mix of wifi and badly run Cat6 cable to a couple of rooms.

 

If I get SWMBO approval at some point, I'll be completely stripping out my "office", gib and all, and modernize that room at least with a couple of wall ports etc, replace power sockets with ones with built in USB connectors for charging etc.

 

 





XPD / Gavin / DemiseNZ

 

Server : i5-3470s @ 3.50GHz  16GB RAM  Win 10 Pro    Workstation : i5-3570K @ 3.40GHz  20GB RAM  RX580 4GB Win 10 Pro    Console : Xbox One

 

https://www.xpd.co.nz - Games, emulation, geekery, and my attempts at photography.     Now on BigPipe 100/100 and 2Talk

 

http://storm.xpd.co.nz - NZ Rock at its finest (WIP)

 

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  # 2285095 29-Jul-2019 11:14
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Got it … thanks to all who replied.


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  # 2287398 1-Aug-2019 21:56
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All of our phone jacks were daisy-chained together, as that was the typical approach in older houses even if Cat 5e cable was used. So we couldn't use that cable, but in a few instances I was able to feed new Cat 5e cable under the house and up the wall to the phone jack and replace them with RJ-45 outlets, so that we didn't need new wall boxes fitted. It has worked fairly well, with a small distribution patch panel in the basement next to the ONT. It also means there is lots of flexibility to put in extra wifi access points to cover dead spots in the house.


 
 
 
 


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  # 2287401 1-Aug-2019 22:09
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I ran a crapload of cat5 thru probably 20+ years ago now and its all handling gigabit and PoE just fine to everything with no bad stats on the switch ports. If I upgrade it will be when terminating fiber becomes cheap enough for it to be worth me buying the machine. Probably be a while before 10 gig comes along and switches cost too much at the moment too. So for now I have a good chance that I wont be able to distribute the fiber properly around the place with what I have in place when it goes to 10gig.





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  # 2287439 2-Aug-2019 06:45
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My bet is on us moving to 2.5/5G options that can use our old cat5e copper before any real need to move to 10g fibre in the house, expect to see more switches sporting this feature over time, cat5e if installed ok will run 10G in short runs (ie around 20m) and will run 2.5G to full 100m and 5G to 70-100m, cat6 will run 5G to 100m and 10G to 50-60m if correctly installed, few homes would have runs over 40m.

 

Still a bit confused as to exactly what applications at the edge need 10G, I honestly think we will still be using 1G with no real need for more in 20yrs time, these comments dont reflect what happens in aggregation and the data centre/server room, clearly 10,40,100G or more is required to keep all those 1G end points pumped up.

 

I suspect tele tranporters are what will mark the need to 10G at the edge, once we have run out of lithium and cobalt to keep our EV's running, and all the oil is reserved for plastics to litter the sea with after use, I will well and truly be out of here by then.

 

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  # 2287540 2-Aug-2019 10:16
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It’s something the building industry needs to get on board with. Where a house was previously wired with phone jacks in useful places, every room should now be wired with at least two data outlets. Four are better when you consider the possibility of hdmi over twin cat6.

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  # 2287551 2-Aug-2019 10:22
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MadEngineer: It’s something the building industry needs to get on board with. Where a house was previously wired with phone jacks in useful places, every room should now be wired with at least two data outlets. Four are better when you consider the possibility of hdmi over twin cat6.

 

HDMI over twin cables can be a bad idea. Sync issues and such.  You can get baluns that work over one cable , not sure about 4k though. 

 

The industry needs to get fibre into peoples home ,  simply for the sake of video distribution... but obviously it will benefit data too. HDMI is outdated and constantly needs physical upgrades to keep up with higher bandwidth.  Cat6 is too slow for video. 

 

Only fibre is future proof. Why the slow development in a common structured fibre wiring standard? 

 

 

 

 


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  # 2287791 2-Aug-2019 16:53
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How would that even work domestically? It’s all fun and games until someone gets a laser beam in their eye!

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  # 2287812 2-Aug-2019 18:00
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Hi, mm fibre would be adequate for internal networks, and 850nm optics are safe for unprotected eye exposure.

As for hdmi distribution, to me it seems not the real answer. Direct streaming to smart displays etc is far more effective, roll on sky expanding there streaming from the newly launched sports product to movies and all other channels.

Cyril

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  # 2287842 2-Aug-2019 19:44
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cyril7: Hi, mm fibre would be adequate for internal networks, and 850nm optics are safe for unprotected eye exposure.

As for hdmi distribution, to me it seems not the real answer. Direct streaming to smart displays etc is far more effective, roll on sky expanding there streaming from the newly launched sports product to movies and all other channels.

Cyril

 

Multiple displays will not be in sync with each other when using their own video streaming and decoding. Even 2 TVs playing freeview off air will get to be half a second apart, and thats 2 of the same type. There will always be the case to pass full quality uncompressed video around a place. Even getting video from an AV reciever to a display or projector is beyond most cheap HDMI cables at 4k 60 HDR, and thats not even at full quality since everything HDMI seems to dumb it down to 4:2:2 when doing anything more than 8 bit.





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  # 2287918 3-Aug-2019 00:03
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cyril7:

 

Still a bit confused as to exactly what applications at the edge need 10G, I honestly think we will still be using 1G with no real need for more in 20yrs time, these comments dont reflect what happens in aggregation and the data centre/server room, clearly 10,40,100G or more is required to keep all those 1G end points pumped up.

 

 

The basic problem with 1 gigabit Ethernet is that hard drives have now got faster than that speed.  So when you are copying video files between machines with modern hard drives (or SSDs), you need a faster network.  10 gigabit switches are not too far out of the consumer price range now.  I am looking at this:

 

https://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?itemID=448468

 

and wondering if it might not be time to try 10 GiB.


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