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Jase2985
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  #2557179 4-Sep-2020 17:26
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FYI here is my network cabinet as of this afternoon and just getting fiber

 

Excuse the 3 cables out the bottom, i havent installed my network rack and patch panel yet, going in a separate cupboard, and thats where the other 2 blue un terminated cat6a cables go.

 

There is a bit of space in there but to fit an ONT, Router, Switch and patch panel you need to be careful about placement of things.

 

 

 

 

Thats how far the ONT sticks out:

 

 

 

 

Here is how big the ONT power supply is, you would struggle to mount this on anything except a vertical power socket, the other problem is most Router power supplies are the same shape so you could plug 2 things into a double vertical socket. i will be putting in a constant vigil sentry UPS soon which will allow me to only use one power socket in there and remove the multi board.

 


siyuan

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  #2563262 13-Sep-2020 13:36
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Maybe the way things are done is widely known by professionals, not sure if I should be surprised that the data cabinet came without any instruction manual, not even a briefly description of how the install kit should be used.

 

I've been looking at various pictures of people's setup, what I can't see is how are things (switch/router/ONT) are mounted. Do I need a particular type of screws or other types of accessories? I know @cryil7 described how the ONT's backplate is screwed on to the back of the cabinet, so it sounds like I just need the right type of screws? There are also plastic bits that came with cabinet that seem to be used for mounting things? I'll take a picture of those plastic bits later to show you exactly what I'm referring to.


 
 
 
 


nickb800
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  #2563273 13-Sep-2020 15:00
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I installed sheet of plywood behind so I could use normal screws to attach things

Scott3
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  #2563289 13-Sep-2020 16:03
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Sounds like I have done something quite similar to what you plan.

 

Patch cables are a bit of a mess, Some are longer than they need to be. For me a mix of colors and no cable management was the most convenient option. I rarely go in the cabinet as most of the wallplates I use are fully patched in to the switch.

ONT, 24 port cat 6 patch panel, compact 16 port unmanned gigabit switch all inside the cabinet. Seen as there was space I put my 2 bay NAS in there too, something I never planned.

 

Note that there is no router in their. I am using an all in one, so the ONT is wired to the router in my office (roughly middle of home), and another drop links the router back to the switch which livens other required Ethernet ports in my house.

 

One thing to note was that my walls were to thin to hold the box, so I had to make a border to get the box to stick neatly out of the wall a little bit.

 

 

 

[Edit] - I got a sparky in to put that power-point in, along with resolving out another couple of things in the house. - Installing an additional power outlet is not something that a home owner can legally do themselves.


Handle9
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  #2563293 13-Sep-2020 16:18
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OP please don't take Scott3 example as "good." It probably works fine for him but it's not how things should be done and in the hands of someone who is not very careful could cause long term problems.

 

Patch panels should be secured and string isn't generally used to mount switches.


siyuan

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  #2563294 13-Sep-2020 16:58
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As mentioned, these plastic bits some to be used for mounting things, but there's no instruction menual that describes how they are used. If they are exactly what I need, where can I get more of them (I don't even know what they are called)?

 

Click to see full size


Handle9
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  #2563295 13-Sep-2020 17:00
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Does the left hand one have a thread in the top (or bottom in your photo)?

It looks like you pop the right hand one into the perforation then push the left hand one inside it to lock it in place

 
 
 
 


Scott3
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  #2563296 13-Sep-2020 17:11
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Handle9:

 

OP please don't take Scott3 example as "good." It probably works fine for him but it's not how things should be done and in the hands of someone who is not very careful could cause long term problems.

 

Patch panels should be secured and string isn't generally used to mount switches.

 

 

My patch panel is mounted on the brackets designed for this application (I think an older variant of what OP linked to in the top post.)

 

That "string" is actually small diameter nylon rope. While this may not be the normal way of mounting switches, It is mechanically perfectly adequate for this purpose. Also this switch did not include mount options in it's design and the rackmount ones that do were too big for this location, so the options were limited to some kind of strapping or double sided tape. - or just not mount it and have it sit on it's end in the bottom :)

 

Obviously neatness wasn't a big criteria - Would have at least mounted the switch square with the cabinet. I just wanted the functionality I desired to be mounted in a cheap and easily accessible way, without the cost and space requirements of a proper rack.

 

Biggest criticism could be heat management, That switch is intended to sit horizontally on a shelf but that switch, and the cabinet isn't intened to have A NAS in it. That said, the switch doesn't have holes for air convection currents so my assumption was that it uses the entire case for cooling, meaning the orientation isn't critical. Also the switch doesn't get very hot, I checked.


Handle9
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  #2563297 13-Sep-2020 17:14
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Scott3:

 

Handle9:

 

OP please don't take Scott3 example as "good." It probably works fine for him but it's not how things should be done and in the hands of someone who is not very careful could cause long term problems.

 

Patch panels should be secured and string isn't generally used to mount switches.

 

 

My patch panel is mounted on the brackets designed for this application (I think an older variant of what OP linked to in the top post.)

 

That "string" is actually small diameter nylon rope. While this may not be the normal way of mounting switches, It is mechanically perfectly adequate for this purpose. Also this switch did not include mount options in it's design and the rackmount ones that do were too big for this location, so the options were limited to some kind of strapping or double sided tape. - or just not mount it and have it sit on it's end in the bottom :)

 

Obviously neatness wasn't a big criteria - Would have at least mounted the switch square with the cabinet. I just wanted the functionality I desired to be mounted in a cheap and easily accessible way, without the cost and space requirements of a proper rack.

 

Biggest criticism could be heat management, That switch is intended to sit horizontally on a shelf but that switch, and the cabinet isn't intened to have A NAS in it. That said, the switch doesn't have holes for air convection currents so my assumption was that it uses the entire case for cooling, meaning the orientation isn't critical. Also the switch doesn't get very hot, I checked.

 

 

Sorry - didn't see the patch panel secured at the top, it looks like it is secured by cable tying to the CAT5/6

 

String:rope same:same. Cable ties are the much neater and more secure way to do it.


Scott3
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  #2563301 13-Sep-2020 17:50
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Handle9:

 

Sorry - didn't see the patch panel secured at the top, it looks like it is secured by cable tying to the CAT5/6

 

String:rope same:same. Cable ties are the much neater and more secure way to do it.

 

 

That cable tie is to prevent the cat6 bundle from putting any strain on the punch down connectors.

 

 


cyril7
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  #2563302 13-Sep-2020 17:59
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Hi, so to secure most things such as switches and some routers which have slots in the rear I use a 6x3/4" screw that uses a number1 square drive, these are self tapers designed for wood but these fit most switches and routers, a number 8 screw is a little too large in the head and not fit well. You will need approx 3mm hole in the back of the cabinet to start these. Be aware if the cabinet backs directly onto a gib wall then you must be carefull how far you over drill and how far you screw the screw in otherwise you may puncture the wall behind gib. If its an outside wall then the cladding should be spaced from the frame so not a problem.

 

Click to see full size

 

Cyril


siyuan

141 posts

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  #2563307 13-Sep-2020 18:38
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Thanks for all those ideas, my cabinet is placed inside an internal wall, but because the cabinet is aligned with the gib at the front, there's roughly 10mm of clearance to the back gib, I intend to put a sheet of ply wood as suggested on the back to put screws into.

 

Handle9: Does the left hand one have a thread in the top (or bottom in your photo)?

It looks like you pop the right hand one into the perforation then push the left hand one inside it to lock it in place

 

You are right, the left one plugs in to the right one. It makes a click sound when inserted and locks it in place.

 

 


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