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aetherius

6 posts

Wannabe Geek


  #2563657 14-Sep-2020 12:25
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I see, so a router is needed to extend the ONT Box's LAN 1 to the other ports on the Ethernet Panel and not a Switch?


nztim
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  #2563663 14-Sep-2020 12:38
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aetherius:

 

I see, so a router is needed to extend the ONT Box's LAN 1 to the other ports on the Ethernet Panel and not a Switch?

 

 

you are with Vodafone, so the ultra hub will go next to the ONT and its WAN port will plug into PORT 1

 

the four LAN ports will then plug into the panel which distribute to the devices in your home

 

Hope that makes sense

 

EDIT: The ultra hub has 3 LAN ports so the red (WAN) plugs into port 1 of the ONT and the 3 yellow (LAN) plugs into your panel which goes to your outlets in your rooms

 

 


 
 
 
 


surfisup1000
4875 posts

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  #2563681 14-Sep-2020 12:58
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aetherius:

 

Sorry, not a very tech savy person - but my plan now is to get a switch that'll connect to the LAN 1 of the ONT Box which would allow more Ethernet cables to connect the other ports throughout our home.

 

 

Should be...

 

ONT->router->switch--->>>>>>>rooms. 

 

ONT converts the 'light' signal coming into your house to an electrical 'ethernet' signal .It is a dumb device, simply translates the signal. 

 

Router is an intelligent device. It plugs into the ONT, and talks to your 'internet provider' equipment and authenticates that you are a paid-up customer. Assuming all is well, the router (and devices connected to the router) can then send / receive internet data.   The router also assigns IP addresses to the devices in your network and ensures internet traffic goes to the internet and local traffic goes to local devices.  This is why it must be connected to the ONT. The router is the 'head' of your network. 

 

The most common issue for home installations is the router does not have enough ports on the back (usually 4) for you to connect all your devices.

 

Although, if you only need to connect 4 rooms/devices then just the router would be OK. 

 

A switch just adds more ethernet ports to your router. Connect your router to your switch, then all the ports on the switch are effectively extra ports on your router.  Kind of like a 4 outlet powerboard allows you to connect 4 appliances to a single power outlet. Switch is effectively a dumb device too, just adds extra ports to the router. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jase2985
10013 posts

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  #2563689 14-Sep-2020 13:09
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tardtasticx:

Clever but try again without clipping the alternative answer that covers the situation of them having a modem/router.

Yours also wouldn’t work. ONT > Router > Patch Panel >
So whatever is on the other end of that port on the patch panel will have a working connection but what about the rest of the ports that OP wants to liven up?

 

I deliberately clipped it to highlight the incorrect information.

 

mine does work, if you want more ports livened in the house install a switch after the router and before patch panel. most people do not need more then 4 ethernet ports around the house in different rooms, they want wifi for rooms like bedrooms etc.


aetherius

6 posts

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  #2563709 14-Sep-2020 13:38
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surfisup1000:

 

aetherius:

 

Sorry, not a very tech savy person - but my plan now is to get a switch that'll connect to the LAN 1 of the ONT Box which would allow more Ethernet cables to connect the other ports throughout our home.

 

 

Should be...

 

ONT->router->switch--->>>>>>>rooms. 

 

ONT converts the 'light' signal coming into your house to an electrical 'ethernet' signal .It is a dumb device, simply translates the signal. 

 

Router is an intelligent device. It plugs into the ONT, and talks to your 'internet provider' equipment and authenticates that you are a paid-up customer. Assuming all is well, the router (and devices connected to the router) can then send / receive internet data.   The router also assigns IP addresses to the devices in your network and ensures internet traffic goes to the internet and local traffic goes to local devices.  This is why it must be connected to the ONT. The router is the 'head' of your network. 

 

The most common issue for home installations is the router does not have enough ports on the back (usually 4) for you to connect all your devices.

 

Although, if you only need to connect 4 rooms/devices then just the router would be OK. 

 

A switch just adds more ethernet ports to your router. Connect your router to your switch, then all the ports on the switch are effectively extra ports on your router.  Kind of like a 4 outlet powerboard allows you to connect 4 appliances to a single power outlet. Switch is effectively a dumb device too, just adds extra ports to the router. 

 

 

Hello!

 

Your explanation raised more questions to me, If I understood it completely our ONT Box LAN 1 (https://www.chorus.co.nz/q/model-type-300) connects to our Wifi Modem (supplied by vodafone) directly into its WAN port right?

 

But how come in our home the ONT Box's LAN 1 connects to one of the ports in the Ethernet Panel, and that port corresponds to the one in our living room. Our modem is there at the moment.

 

Home Network picture: https://ibb.co/6ZxNHq5

 

Ethernet Panel picture: https://ibb.co/B2dFfS1 

 

ONT Box LAN 1 picture: https://ibb.co/ZHJZS7Z

 

Is there a away for me to have multiple Ethernet cables attached to the LAN 1 of the ONT Box so I can connect them to the other ports on the Ethernet Panel? Similar to the functional explanation you gave of the switch? To paraphrase: connect 4 Ethernet cable to a single LAN 1 outlet?

 

I also tried shoving our modem in the panel it does not fit at all, so if anything I need a very compact router/switch/splitter or whatever to execute my plan to keep everything in the comparment where the whole thing is in.


shk292
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  #2563713 14-Sep-2020 13:46
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OP, it’s quite simple. The only thing that can be connected to the ONT LAN port is the WAN port of your router (that you’re incorrectly referring to as a modern). This can be directly, or via your house wiring, it doesn’t matter. But any other devices need to be connected to the routers LAN ports or wifi. If needed, this can be via a switch and/or installed Ethernet cables

cyril7
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  #2563714 14-Sep-2020 13:48
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Hi, if you want to leave your router in the lounge then that is fine, but as I mentioned earlier you need to find a way to return the LAN of the router back to the garage cabinet so you can connect to other outlets.

 

If your internet plan is just a 100/20 then you will need a pair of these to split the cable and a small switch.

 

You then connect LAN1 of the ONT to the left port of one of the splitter and plug the splitter into the cabinet patch socket going to the lounge, and in the lounge plug in the other splitter and connect the left hand port of that splitter into teh WAN of the vodafone router. Then plug one of the three lan ports of the router into the right hand side of the splitter, and in the garage plug the right hand socket of the splitter there into the switch, then plug other ports of the switch into other room outlets, job done.

 

The only down side of this is that your speeds will be limited to 100/100, that is not a problem if your ISP plan is just 100/20, but if its a 950/500 plan then you will need another solution using two more clever switches and a bit of configuration, this will allow you to achieve full speeds most for most connection situations.

 

Cyril


 
 
 
 


surfisup1000
4875 posts

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  #2563842 14-Sep-2020 16:17
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aetherius:

 

Your explanation raised more questions to me, If I understood it completely our ONT Box LAN 1 (https://www.chorus.co.nz/q/model-type-300) connects to our Wifi Modem (supplied by vodafone) directly into its WAN port right?

 

But how come in our home the ONT Box's LAN 1 connects to one of the ports in the Ethernet Panel, and that port corresponds to the one in our living room. Our modem is there at the moment.

 

Home Network picture: https://ibb.co/6ZxNHq5

 

Ethernet Panel picture: https://ibb.co/B2dFfS1 

 

ONT Box LAN 1 picture: https://ibb.co/ZHJZS7Z

 

Is there a away for me to have multiple Ethernet cables attached to the LAN 1 of the ONT Box so I can connect them to the other ports on the Ethernet Panel? Similar to the functional explanation you gave of the switch? To paraphrase: connect 4 Ethernet cable to a single LAN 1 outlet?

 

I also tried shoving our modem in the panel it does not fit at all, so if anything I need a very compact router/switch/splitter or whatever to execute my plan to keep everything in the comparment where the whole thing is in.

 

 

Helps to use the correct terminology. The ONT is the modem. The box you have in your living room, supplied by your ISP,  is the 'router'. 

 

"But how come in our home the ONT Box's LAN 1 connects to one of the ports in the Ethernet Panel, and that port corresponds to the one in our living room. Our modem is there at the moment."

 

I'd say someone has misconfigured your setup.It will work , but not in the way you want.

 

"Is there a away for me to have multiple Ethernet cables attached to the LAN 1 of the ONT Box so I can connect them to the other ports on the Ethernet Panel?"

 

No, the LAN1 on the ONT must be connected directly to the router WAN port (in your current setup it goes via the patch port which still counts as a direct connection) 

 

You need to configure a star network to achieve what you want. Look at this picture...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:StarNetwork.svg

 

The center of the star is your ethernet panel/junction box.  The ONT and the router both need to be located together in the ethernet panel (see my comment at the bottom).

 

Physically move the router from your living room, to inside the ethernet panel . Unplug the ethernet cable from patch port "6" in your ethernet panel, and plug it directly into the router wan port.   You have now setup the center of your 'star'. Switch it all on and test that you are connecting to the internet ok. You can plug devices into the back of the router to test.

 

Connect the 4 router ports to the patch panel ports you want to 'activate'  (the star end-points).  eg, connecting to patch port "6" activates your lounge port. 

 

If you decide to get the switch so you can have more active ports, you need to physically locate the switch inside the ethernet panel next to the ONT and router ...  need a double power adaptor too. 

 

The switch adds additional ports to the router.  You'd need an 8 port switch minimum  -- connecting the switch to the router means you lose 2 ports -- meaning your 4 port router and 8 port switch will give you 10 ports in total (4 + 8 - 2) .  If you bought a 5 port switch, you'd only have 7 ports (4 + 5 - 2), which is not enough because you have 8 patch ports. 

 

Something like this is good...

 

https://www.pbtech.co.nz/product/SWHTPL1010/TP-Link-TL-SG1008D-8-Port-Gigabit-Unmanaged-Switch

 

 

 

[edit]You say there is not enough room to put your router into the ethernet panel -- I think you should try to find a way, maybe you need a new ethernet panel? Is the panel in a place you can just leave the panel door open? Can you shift the ont to make more space?

 

This is the best configuration. I don't know why network installers would design a star network topology without allowing space for the required equipment. 


cyril7
7833 posts

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  #2563849 14-Sep-2020 16:34
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Hi, if you remove the VDSL panel, its not required, and carefully rotate the ethernet panel 90deg and move it closer the top of the cabinet and probably use some cable ties to help secure and retain the cables then you should have adequate room.

 

Cyril


evnafets
205 posts

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  #2563861 14-Sep-2020 16:54
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surfisup1000:

 

Helps to use the correct terminology. The ONT is the modem. The box you have in your living room, supplied by your ISP,  is the 'router'. 

 

 

Tell that to Vodafone: https://www.vodafone.co.nz/help/broadband-and-tv/modem-support/self-install/

 

And also Chorus: "Your modem will plug into your ONT "  - https://www.chorus.co.nz/help-and-support/fibre-installation/what-ont-and-where-should-i-install-it

 

I'm not even sure if technically the "ONT is the modem", though there are parallels to what a modem does.

 

 

 

Correct or not, "Modem" is generally the term that ISPs have been using to describe the device they ship to customers.

 

In reality it is a combined modem / router / wifi access point - a one stop shop that will suit a large number of customers without further setup/devices required.

 

I'll call it a router, because thats what is generally what it is being used for.

 

 

 

In any case, to put it in laymens terms, the set up should be:

 

ONT connects to WAN port on the modem router device that your provider shipped to you

 

Everything else should end up connecting to the LAN ports on that device.

 

So if you want to use that patch panel in your garage, then your router needs to be there.

 

 

 

As mentioned above, most stock standard routers provided have 4 ethernet ports. 

 

If you need more, then you connect a switch to one of those ethernet ports, and then connect things to that switch.  In effect the switch is the "splitter" to turn one ethernet port into many. 

 

That switch could be located close by the router, or at the other end in the lounge / office / somewhere where you have multiple ethernet cables.

 

 

 

Also mentioned above:  shifting the router to the garage moves your WIFI access point there too.  Which might be a problem for WIFI range. 
One solution is to buy something else that becomes your new WIFI access point, and put that where your router is now.
Cyril7 provided another solution where you can leave the router where it is and connect to the patch panel, but is a bit more complicated :-)

 

 


halper86
272 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2564284 15-Sep-2020 11:49
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Page 15 may be useful: www.chorus.co.nz...


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