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  Reply # 202036 18-Mar-2009 21:49
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Hi, look its all a contestable area, dont forget that all Sky RG6 cables are gel flooded cables of a similar contruction. The real issue is that you dont drag it into a structure more than the outer wall, so running it down an outside wall, wouldnt worry.

Cyril



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  Reply # 202043 18-Mar-2009 22:24
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Didnt Know that,

Thanks Cyril




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  Reply # 202077 19-Mar-2009 07:29
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Just to add, as mentioned, you can get outdoor cat5 in both geled and non, both do the job, but the gel one adds another stage of water protection which is probably not needed, so if it worries you just go for the non gel stuff, but when installing be a little more aware of puncturing it, as if that happens then the water will get in.

Which brings me to one point regarding the comment, "staple" that you use, never staple any transmission line that is to carry RF signals, this includes Cat5/6, RG59/RG6 etc, use plastic clips that are correctly dimensioned to hold but not crimp the cable, or put it in conduit. Also stapling is certain to puncture the sheath at somepoint, so once again the water goes in.

Cyril

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  Reply # 202106 19-Mar-2009 09:48
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cyril7: Which brings me to one point regarding the comment, "staple" that you use, never staple any transmission line that is to carry RF signals, this includes Cat5/6, RG59/RG6 etc, use plastic clips that are correctly dimensioned to hold but not crimp the cable, or put it in conduit. Also stapling is certain to puncture the sheath at somepoint, so once again the water goes in.

Cyril


It also changes the electrical properties (capacitance and inductance) of the cable, so that it's no longer carries the relevant frequencies as efficiently anymore. There are two causes of this - 1) the cable gets deformed by the stapling, changing the physical characteristics of the twisted pairs, and 2) the staples themselves have a very minor electromagnetic effect, but nothing worth worrying about. It's mainly the deformation that's the problem.

This is especially bad for RG58/59/6, and Cat6. Cat5 is pretty resilient and it's unlikely you'll notice it apart from the eventual failure due to water entry that Cyril mentions :)

edit: oh yeah - Don't use cable ties inside the house to support the cat5, use velcro straps on a (preferably non-metal) support wire or some such.




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