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8 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 57523 16-Feb-2010 15:57
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Hi all,


I installed a bunch of Lexcom Cat7 cable into my house a while back when doing some renovations and now want to connect some of it up. I've decided against using Lexcom components due to price, inflexibility of modules available and lack of info for DIYers. I recall someone on the list a while back saying they used Lexcom cable to wire an otherwise conventional structured network and just wondered what the best approach is to wire the cable to Cat6A spec. What wiring scheme should be used? Does the colour coding on the Lexcom wiring map to wiring standards and if not what's the best mapping to use? Finally, any recommendations on the type of RJ-45 plug to connect. I was looking at the bog standard Cat 6 RJ-45 8P8C Modular Plug (Rounded Solid) - 50 micron product from CablesDirect - will that suffice.


The Cat7 spec says "Category 7 is terminated with RJ-45 compatible GG45 connectors or TERA connectors, and it is rated for transmission frequencies up to 600 MHz" but I take it lower spec connectors can be used to get Cat6 results.


Full RJ-45 list at: http://www.cablesdirect.co.nz/catalog/search?quickfind_needle=rj45%20plug%20solid%20round


Thanks in advance,
Matt







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  Reply # 300119 18-Feb-2010 13:28
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Hi, yes you should be able to terminate it on cat5e or cat6 keystones and use it as such, however I advise against leaving the shield floating, I would terminate it (at one end only) to earth. Probably the simplist way to achieve that is to use a shielded patch panel that will provide an earthing platform for the cable.

I would avoid cat7 for home use (infact for any use), cat6 is more than most home requirements, why do you think you need 6a spec. If its to carry RF then I recommend you use RG6, the losses above the VHF band are significantly less than cat6a or 7, in otherwords you cannot carry most UHF or any LBand sat IF feeds, so why use it for that, any other services are adequatly serviced with cat5e or 6.


Cyril



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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 300122 18-Feb-2010 13:46
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Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately there's no choice left with the cable as it's installed and in the walls. I did read about the shortcomings of Cat6/7 for broadcast signals so ran RG6 at the same time. That said, as I'm running a homebuilt Media Centre (MythTV) and time-shift everything, it's hardly ever likely I, or members of my family, will watch live broadcasts over anything other than data feeds. 


I was wondering about grounding all that foil in the Cat 7. Damn shame a 20-port shielded patch panel is about $350+ compared to about $80 for a regular one - not looking forward to that purchase. Curious, are you recommending grounding for interference reasons or electrical safety (i.e. lightning conduction and the like).


Matt

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  Reply # 300172 18-Feb-2010 16:46
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Hi, the reason for grounding the foil is to prevent that floating foil from coupling rubbish into the pairs, without grounding it you end up with a potential noise/interference problem that 10 fold worse than unshielded. You could use a standard patch panel and gather the drain wires and connect them all together, messy but much cheaper, I would advise you soldier them. As they are not carrying any actual signals the wiring of those ground drain wires need not be tight if you get my drift. But only ground at one end, ensure the other cannot touch ground or you will get ground loops.

Cheers
Cyril

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  Reply # 300962 22-Feb-2010 12:42
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The Cat.7 colour coding should still be the same standard as Cat.5 but the wire might be heavier guage so probably Cat6 jackpoints would fit better. Cat.6a and above is designed for 10Gbps Ethernet so overkill for anything else. Gigabit Ethernet has faster latency anyway, and its enough for normal situations.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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