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23 posts

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# 59070 25-Mar-2010 19:36
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Hi

I have a local network with a couple of computers and a nas-drive on a SMC7004VBR router. (This is the entire network - no internet access or anything). (I call this "network 1").

I have another local network on a WAG310G modem-router, with a couple of computers on it. (This network has access to the internet). (I call this "network 2").

Is it possible to "join" these two networks together, so that the computers on "network 2" can see the nas-drive on "network 1"? And also so that the computers on "network 1" gain access to the internet via "network 2". If so, how?

I have tried simply putting a cable from a LAN port on "network 2 router" to the WAN port on "network 1 router" - and this indeed allows "network 1" access to the internet. But it does not allow the computers on "network 2" to see the nas-drive on "network 1".


Thanks,
Peter



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19 posts

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HostingDirect

  # 311422 25-Mar-2010 19:56
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Hey,
Are the subnets from Network1 and Network2 the same?
are there any Vlans involved?
Have you setup any routing policies on any of these devices>?

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  # 311423 25-Mar-2010 19:58
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Just run a cable from the LAN port of one router to the LAN port of the other. Ensure you only only have a single DHCP server allocating IP addresses, preferably the router that has the internet connection as it will then be allocating the correct gateway address.

 
 
 
 


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  # 311431 25-Mar-2010 20:17
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Is there any reason you need to have two routers operating?



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Geek


  # 312301 29-Mar-2010 10:02
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I don't really need 2 routers. The reason I am trying this, is because I have a NAS drive which won't work if I connect it to my new modem/router (a linksys WAG310G), but it does work connected to my old router (SMC7004VBR). I have no idea why.

So I thought, just leave the old router/network as it is (with the NAS) drive; install the new router as the internet connection, and add my new computers to that; and find out how to hook up the two networks, so computers on the new network can access the NAS on the old network.

But no luck yet.

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  # 312645 29-Mar-2010 22:26
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xdzgor: I don't really need 2 routers. The reason I am trying this, is because I have a NAS drive which won't work if I connect it to my new modem/router (a linksys WAG310G), but it does work connected to my old router (SMC7004VBR). I have no idea why.

So I thought, just leave the old router/network as it is (with the NAS) drive; install the new router as the internet connection, and add my new computers to that; and find out how to hook up the two networks, so computers on the new network can access the NAS on the old network.

But no luck yet.


So - the old router is staying on due to requiring access to the NAS?  In that case I would ignore the old router and concentrate on why the NAS won't work.

Can you tell me:  What is the IP address to access the old router?  What is the IP address to access the new router?  What is the IP address to access (and configure / administer) the NAS box?

Do not post any usernames / passwords.

Once I know that I can work on what your next steps should be :-)



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Geek


  # 312949 30-Mar-2010 18:43
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wazzageek: So - the old router is staying on due to requiring access to the NAS?  In that case I would ignore the old router and concentrate on why the NAS won't work.

Can you tell me:  What is the IP address to access the old router?  What is the IP address to access the new router?  What is the IP address to access (and configure / administer) the NAS box?

Do not post any usernames / passwords.

Once I know that I can work on what your next steps should be :-)


Hi

yes, the only reason I kept the old router/network was because there were no problems with accessing the NAS drive on this network.

The IP address of the old router is 192.168.2.1
The IP address of the new router is 192.168.1.1

Those were both the default values. I have also tried setting the old router to 192.168.1.1, and I can still access the NAS drive on its network. (I haven't tried setting the new router to 192.168.2.1 though).

As to the "NAS box", I don't know what its IP address is! When I use the routers' browser-based configuration pages, I can see the IP addresses of the computers connected - but there is nothing identifying the NAS drive. How can this be?

The NAS drive is a relatively old "Amitech Netshare" 300GB disk - with a RJ45 port on the back. In order to access it from client machines (windows XP or Vista machines) I needed to install a program on each client, called "NDAS Device Management". This is the only place that "configuration" of the NAS drive occurs - and it is minimal. There are some codes (text) you have to enter when you "register" the disk (the software finds the disk over the network). No IP address.

When you activate the program, it is somehow able to find the NAS drive and connect to it (the NAS drive then appears as a disk in Windows explorer). It doesn't seem to matter what IP address the old router has.

Thanks,
Peter



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Ultimate Geek


  # 312971 30-Mar-2010 18:58
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It should not matter what router your plugged into unless it is possibly getting a conflicting ip address.

My advice to you would be figure out the ip address of the device through your router, sniffing or google (for the default setup.

Start with the devices manual or google if you havent changed any settings on the device to do with DHCP or ip addressing.

Also note if you see DHCP anywhere.

 
 
 
 


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  # 313170 30-Mar-2010 21:49
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xdzgor:
wazzageek: So - the old router is staying on due to requiring access to the NAS?  In that case I would ignore the old router and concentrate on why the NAS won't work.

Can you tell me:  What is the IP address to access the old router?  What is the IP address to access the new router?  What is the IP address to access (and configure / administer) the NAS box?

Do not post any usernames / passwords.

Once I know that I can work on what your next steps should be :-)


Hi

yes, the only reason I kept the old router/network was because there were no problems with accessing the NAS drive on this network.

The IP address of the old router is 192.168.2.1
The IP address of the new router is 192.168.1.1

Those were both the default values. I have also tried setting the old router to 192.168.1.1, and I can still access the NAS drive on its network. (I haven't tried setting the new router to 192.168.2.1 though).

As to the "NAS box", I don't know what its IP address is! When I use the routers' browser-based configuration pages, I can see the IP addresses of the computers connected - but there is nothing identifying the NAS drive. How can this be?

The NAS drive is a relatively old "Amitech Netshare" 300GB disk - with a RJ45 port on the back. In order to access it from client machines (windows XP or Vista machines) I needed to install a program on each client, called "NDAS Device Management". This is the only place that "configuration" of the NAS drive occurs - and it is minimal. There are some codes (text) you have to enter when you "register" the disk (the software finds the disk over the network). No IP address.

When you activate the program, it is somehow able to find the NAS drive and connect to it (the NAS drive then appears as a disk in Windows explorer). It doesn't seem to matter what IP address the old router has.

Thanks,
Peter




If you look through the software provided, is there an option to "rediscover" or to find new nas drives on the network? 

204 posts

Master Geek


  # 313187 30-Mar-2010 22:04
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yes, the only reason I kept the old router/network was because there were no problems with accessing the NAS drive on this network.

The IP address of the old router is 192.168.2.1
The IP address of the new router is 192.168.1.1

Those were both the default values. I have also tried setting the old router to 192.168.1.1, and I can still access the NAS drive on its network.



Yes, that is probably because the DHCP lease hadnt expired. Did you power everything off, and then back on once the router IP had been changed?



I haven't tried setting the new router to 192.168.2.1 though.



Why not try it ;-)



As to the "NAS box", I don't know what its IP address is! When I use the routers' browser-based configuration pages, I can see the IP addresses of the computers connected - but there is nothing identifying the NAS drive. How can this be?



Could be a static IP address. This wont show necessarily show on the router.



The NAS drive is a relatively old "Amitech Netshare" 300GB disk - with a RJ45 port on the back. In order to access it from client machines (windows XP or Vista machines) I needed to install a program on each client, called "NDAS Device Management". This is the only place that "configuration" of the NAS drive occurs - and it is minimal. There are some codes (text) you have to enter when you "register" the disk (the software finds the disk over the network). No IP address.

When you activate the program, it is somehow able to find the NAS drive and connect to it (the NAS drive then appears as a disk in Windows explorer).




Can you post some screenshots please?



It doesn't seem to matter what IP address the old router has.



This may be due to static IP on NAS + DHCP lease....can you post a copy of ipconfig /all run from a command prompt?






I would love to change the world, but they won't give me the source code

#BOFH

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  # 313232 30-Mar-2010 22:49
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sbiddle: Just run a cable from the LAN port of one router to the LAN port of the other. Ensure you only only have a single DHCP server allocating IP addresses, preferably the router that has the internet connection as it will then be allocating the correct gateway address.


Linking LAN ports on the 2 routers should work if you use a crossover cable but why is one of the networks connected to a router that doesnt route anywhere? Do you need that router for wireless or anything special, or was it just convenient because of the built-in ethernet switch? I presume both routers run DHCP so if you still need that 2nd router you will have to turn off DHCP. Alternatively just pull the router out and get a simple ethernet switch for network 1 instead. The switch will plobably have a crossover port or auto-sense, so you can plug a normal straight cable into the other LAN and link together both netowrks to form a single LAN.

You might be able to turn off the NAT on the second router if you still want to plug into the WAN port, and configure the DHCP for a different subnet of IP addresses, but not sure how that router functions without NAT.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  # 313362 31-Mar-2010 09:42
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webwat:
sbiddle: Just run a cable from the LAN port of one router to the LAN port of the other. Ensure you only only have a single DHCP server allocating IP addresses, preferably the router that has the internet connection as it will then be allocating the correct gateway address.


Linking LAN ports on the 2 routers should work if you use a crossover cable but why is one of the networks connected to a router that doesnt route anywhere?


Many consumer grade kit now comes with Auto MDI/MDI-X so crossover cables aren't as necessary as they used to be.

The redundant router in question is still in place due to the NAS box (it's in one of the earlier responses from the OP)



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