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  Reply # 340184 10-Jun-2010 13:28
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CutCutCut: Ok, it's not the most beautiful thing either.


and you have to cut a big hole in your wall for it to fit
and yes, probably not enough data outlets

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  Reply # 340194 10-Jun-2010 13:51
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Give it a miss

Cyril



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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 340198 10-Jun-2010 13:56
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Now, I'm assuming flush boxes are only any good for installing if you have the gib off? Look like you'd need a big hole to get that in?

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  Reply # 340221 10-Jun-2010 14:41
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CutCutCut: Now, I'm assuming flush boxes are only any good for installing if you have the gib off? Look like you'd need a big hole to get that in?


No, in end first and turn in the wall

Can be a problem in older thinner walls with 3x2 or whatever size it is they used in the olddays.




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 340381 10-Jun-2010 19:31
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richms:
CutCutCut: Now, I'm assuming flush boxes are only any good for installing if you have the gib off? Look like you'd need a big hole to get that in?


No, in end first and turn in the wall

Can be a problem in older thinner walls with 3x2 or whatever size it is they used in the olddays.


Where I can't use a flush mount box are those wall board mounting brackets the way to go or is it easier to use some gib plugs and screw it in?

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  Reply # 340383 10-Jun-2010 19:35
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I wouldnt recommend direct fix of things with RJ45s or coax since there is a solid connection to the cable, so a single trip over it and the plate is ripped from the wall or worse.

Find a way to mount it unless you are certain that there is no way it will get yanked on like behind a tv etc.

Someone who knows the regs more will be able to say what the deal is with direct fixing in the vicinity of power. I didnt need to do that here since there was always a flushbox and always a stud between power and data, but I know that you cant direct fix power and data into the same wall cavity. Not sure if only one is open backed how it works out.




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 340437 10-Jun-2010 21:37
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Oh right, didn't even consider there'd be regualtions regarding this, opps.



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  Reply # 341081 12-Jun-2010 22:30
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richms: I wouldnt recommend direct fix of things with RJ45s or coax since there is a solid connection to the cable, so a single trip over it and the plate is ripped from the wall or worse.

Find a way to mount it unless you are certain that there is no way it will get yanked on like behind a tv etc.

Someone who knows the regs more will be able to say what the deal is with direct fixing in the vicinity of power. I didnt need to do that here since there was always a flushbox and always a stud between power and data, but I know that you cant direct fix power and data into the same wall cavity. Not sure if only one is open backed how it works out.


Any hints from anybody about where I could find more regualatory info about this stuff regarding power/flushboxes/mounting etc?

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  Reply # 341111 13-Jun-2010 02:30
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They are in standards that you have to pay to get, and dont really tell you in a way that means anything to you. Thats what sparkys and other contractors get paid to learn.

AFAIK if its in a seperate wall cavety then its fine for direct fixing, otherwise you need a flushbox and seperation, but I am sures omeone on here will know the exact distances etc.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 341553 14-Jun-2010 15:23
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Since you are planning to put everything directly in a cupboard with a power jackpoint, you dont want metal brackets or patch panels. You also dont want the data cables coming in too close to the power socket of course. That would make the plasticy 12-port panel ideal, because you arent putting it on an earthed metal cabinet at all, and your electrician didnt setup a "telecom earth" that you can connect yourself (without needing an electrician to access it).

You still need a reasonable separation between data cabling and the power socket, which maybe should have been outside the cupboard. Whats the normal way to manage electrical safety in a cupboard like this?




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^



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  Reply # 341569 14-Jun-2010 15:59
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Got the 12 port plastic patch panel so that's good. Yeah Ishould be able to keep the power and data cables well seperated in the cupboard. Inside the cupboard was far more practical without drilling holes in the wall or havingcables running about on the walls, so hopefully I'll be all good.



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  Reply # 342097 15-Jun-2010 21:06
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After reading sbiddles guide again I see he advises at least 200mm seperation between data and power, there will bea at least that, probably more. The power cables actually are on the wall, as opposed to in the wall and come into the 2 wall mounted boxes, 1 at the top of the cupboard and 1 at the bottom.

I had a chorus tech around this afternoon while I'm at work, getting rid of a hum on the phone line, so we'll see how it sounds when I get home.



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  Reply # 342293 16-Jun-2010 13:11
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I believe solid core Cat5e is able to be crimped with the right rj45 modular plugs. Is there any reason why I shouldn't make patch cables with solid core Cat5e myself?

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  Reply # 342326 16-Jun-2010 14:50
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Doing a similar project myself, just ordered the parts from CablesDirect.

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  Reply # 342335 16-Jun-2010 15:04
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CutCutCut: I believe solid core Cat5e is able to be crimped with the right rj45 modular plugs. Is there any reason why I shouldn't make patch cables with solid core Cat5e myself?


Even with the right plugs they go flakey with some use and need another squeeze in the crimper to get working properly again.

OK when they never get moved like at a wall mounted switch or something going onto the fixed wiring, but no good for an actual patch cable.




Richard rich.ms

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