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cldlr76

289 posts

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  #345467 26-Jun-2010 10:54
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Hi,

I know there is supposed to be a test jack in the system somewhere, does it go before or after the filter?

Also can I wire the blue pair coming out of the filter straight into the patch panel or does it have to go to a jack first and then the patch panel?

And one final thing, for now, Does the age of BT jack that is wired to the modem pair of the filter matter? i.e. do they wear out and affect connection speeds, or is it worth me going to M10 and spending the $15.00 for a new one?

 

Thanks

 

cyril7
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  #345482 26-Jun-2010 11:36
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Hi, a proper test jack also provides an isolation feature, ie you can disconnect the whole house installation and access the clean inbound line, if you cannot provide that then I would not sweat about it, but I recommend you at least provide a socket before anything including the filter, just a 2wire BT with inbound line terminating on it and line side of filter connecting also is fine a 2W BT socket gives you 3 IDC headers for each leg which is handy.

What you do with the phone/blue pair is up to you, just direct to the patch panel (presumably you will wire it to 3 or 4 sockets for patching)

Wire the modem side to one of your patch panel port if there is one spare, then just plug the RJ11-RJ11 modem line cord straight into it. So from your filter have a length of cat5 cable with voice on blue and DSL line on orange going ot the patch panel.

Otherwise yes BTs can wear out, if its an older M/S type then I would fling it, get a new 2Wire BT, or a surface mount RJ45 for the modem is a good alternative and cheaper.

Cyril


 
 
 
 


cldlr76

289 posts

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  #345509 26-Jun-2010 13:59
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Yeah I'll wire the blue pair across for ports for patching.  I hadn't though of connecting the modem side to the patch panel as well, thats a good idea.  I'm guessing it doesn't matter which of 8 terminals on the port you wire the pair to?

Is th proper test jack something you buy with isolation switch or something, or is to do with the way you wire it up?

If I go with the normal 2W BT jack do I  just connect the incoming line to terminals 2 and 5 the filter to 1 and 6 or do I still connect the incoming line and the filter with scotch locs?



cyril7
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  #345525 26-Jun-2010 15:20
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Hi, with RJ45s you must use pair1 for phones or DSL modem, thats the blue pair, centre pins 4 and 5, nothing else.

The only phone module with proper test port that I know you can readily buy here is the ST2206 that I designed for Signet. Otherwise you can wire one up on a RJ45 socket and make a jumper plug.

If its a older Master/Slave (M/S) BT socket then you must only ever connect to pins 2/5, nothing else. If its a newer 2Wire BT (which I strongly recommend you do) then there are two IDC header rows, in each row all the pin points are connected together one header row is pin 2 the other is pin5, so you can parallel wiring including the filter via that.

Cyril

cldlr76

289 posts

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  #345842 27-Jun-2010 20:30
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Thanks for all the advice,  I wired up the test point today, and everything is working great. 

I also got an email from slingshot to say the interleaving had been turned on but there is still nothing showing in the line stats, is there anything I do to do from my end for that?

Below is a pic of the section of floor plan I'm working on at the moment.  Do the outlets I have planned seem reasonable? 



Although the laptops at either end of the couch are wireless, copying to and from the HTPC or viewing content from the web works better when they are on a wired connection, hence the RJ45's at either end of the couch.

Cheers

webwat
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  #345851 27-Jun-2010 21:01
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Yes, the test jackpoint should come before the splitter. I think you can still get BT master sockets from The Warehouse too (about same price...) but the splitter has solid wires that are not suitable for normal plugs that match the disconnect/test socket. You could perhaps wire the splitter to the punchdown side of a dual RJ45 jack (the surfacemount ones) so you have a plug going IN from the BT test jack, a plug coming OUT to the modem, and the third wire for the phones going straight to a patch panel joining all the blue ports as a "common".

You then need a second bunch of ports, probably another patch panel so you can decide which outlets go to the phone service and which ones get Ethernet from the ADSL modem. Cyril's ST2206 replaces the commoning and testing aspects, so you still need another patch panel to terminate the wiring from each room in the house. I guess you have at least 2 cables to each room so you can have both phone and internet everywhere.

EDIT: reboot the modem to see the interleaving on. It should make the data transmission more reliable, which translates to higher throughput at the same modem datarate.




Time to find a new industry!


richms
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  #345887 27-Jun-2010 22:49
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With the invention of cheap multihandset dect phones the need to sent the analog phone to several places is really removed IMO, just power for the chargers in the bedrooms (unless you have an analog novelty phone you like)




Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


webwat
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  #345908 28-Jun-2010 00:24
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Still need at least 1 phone in the house that works during a power cut... Even if you have your wireless on a UPS its still a good and cheap backup. But if you go that way then you can use a smaller patch for the phone common.




Time to find a new industry!


cldlr76

289 posts

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  #345926 28-Jun-2010 08:10
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I hear what your saying about the DECT phones,  but with 2 sky decoders, which granted don't need to be hooked up to a phone line all the time, 1 DECT phone and a speaker phone in the office there's the 4 ports gone.  Obviously Voip is the way to go in the long term.

Any thoughts on my layout above?

webwat
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  #345999 28-Jun-2010 12:07
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Long term voip can be used anywhere you have ethernet, but an ATA at the distributor (or on your FTTH setup) will also provide standard phone with central battery backup if you have it, so the idea is for each outlet around the house/office to be "generic" by connecting everything to a patch panel that allows each port to be easily patched to whatever service. The standard is for minimum 2 RJ45 ports at each outlet, which seems like overkill until you start using them up. So upgrading your office phone to voip would simply involve moving the patch cable at the distributor from the phone panel to a switch/modem. If you cable more rooms, you might need a couple of patch panels.




Time to find a new industry!


cldlr76

289 posts

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  #347556 3-Jul-2010 19:52
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My interleaving settings finally kicked in and I got about another 200kbps to up to 4.25 - 4.3mbps so thanks for the tip Cyril.


CutCutCut
944 posts

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  #347566 3-Jul-2010 21:16
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I've just put one of those 12 port wall mountable patch panels up, relatively easy to install. And in the future if you need more I guess you can just put a second one in.

cldlr76

289 posts

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  #347568 3-Jul-2010 21:32
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I was going to go for one of those 10" 12 port patch panels and then was looking around and found this 24 port patch panel for about the same price.  So thinking I might go for that. 

Was also thinking of building cabinet out of MDF to mount the patch panel (regardless of which one I get) in.  Is there is any reason why I couldn't do this?




richms
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  #347602 4-Jul-2010 02:59
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It will be a lot more work to make something to hold the 24 port rack mount one than to get a couple of the 12 port surface mount ones which will just screw to anything flat.




Richard rich.ms

cldlr76

289 posts

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  #347615 4-Jul-2010 08:44
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Is that just a weight issue?  looking at the pic in the link above it looks like it could just screw onto something flat. 

I was thinking I could just build an MDF box and then glue/screw some framing timber I have lying around inside it to screw the face of the patch panel onto.  something like this?



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