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  Reply # 523276 19-Sep-2011 21:52
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the punch down tool he has WILL NOT WORK properly. You need a 110 punch down tool.

And sorry didnt read the last part of the first question. yea just put the modem with the patch panel. Its kind of the point of centralised comms.

a 'loop back plug' would be a waste of space in this situation (actually its a waste of space in ANY situation). If you have the right tool you can common up jacks with a 110 termination like i have with my voice panel. Because my $2.50 tool doesnt cut of the wire I just lay out heaps of extra and push it down in each position I want it to appear on the panel...
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150826795890177&set=a.372765505176.354386.859035176&type=1&...

I have a 50-port dynamix voice panel (Seriously serious overkill i know. But it is what we had at work and it was free so who cares). This means I have 5 groups of 10 ports to play with. I have a cat 6 running from etp to patch panel. Blue pair is first group of 10, orange for second and green for third. Then DSL comes in on the brown pair (just cos i like being different) and goes only to port 50 on the voice tie (As you can see it isnt in multiple like the rest). I only have one line but this gives the opportunity for more lines to be connected and patched around the place.

So on your 24-port patch panel just make the blue wire long enough to be strapped between the ports you want to be voice and push them down (without cutting them off) in to the 'blue pair' (pins 4&5) of each port. The whole point is 110 blocks dont work very well with more than one wire.



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  Reply # 523295 19-Sep-2011 22:30
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"Whats the point connecting DSL signal to a jackpoint if you already have a patch panel?"

The modem is a wireless N router and modem hence you dont get much good wifi reception from the back of a cupboard. Therefore i have planned 2 ports high on a wall in the hallway for maximum reception. (one for the dsl line and one to feed back to the switch in the wiring cupboard)

I have now got the punchdown tool linked above (Hanlong Tool), much better than the ebay one and works very nicely in 110 blocks.

Will just be daisy chaining the blue/white pair from telecom etp to the end 4 ports on the patch panel by stripping lots of insulation and running the cable successively to each 110 block.
and the DSL line to 1 port on the patch panel.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 523311 19-Sep-2011 23:10
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Yeah, thats one of the reasons I dont like the all in one routers and have several AP's around the house. The signal from the one in the router that I only use when I break my firewall is hopeless from the shelf in a metal rack in the server closet ;)




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 574438 28-Jan-2012 16:54
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I have finally started my blog about this whole process, Part 1 is up now here:

http://www.geekzone.co.nz/hazza87

Feel free to tell me about any errors or anything else you think i should put in there.



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  Reply # 580986 13-Feb-2012 18:34
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Part 2 - Installation

NOW LIVE

HERE 

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  Reply # 580996 13-Feb-2012 18:54
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Looks bloody good mate! Only thing I would say is get rid of all that tape on the patch panel and use some cable ties -just takes it to the next level. Cupboard looks awesome too! Iv got my 6RU panel under a shelf in the laundry and be meaning to make up some doors to go on it for ages, this is yet another reminder to do it lol.

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  Reply # 581169 14-Feb-2012 01:13
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hazza87: Part 2 - Installation

NOW LIVE 


Looking good!

Do you have a dedicated phone line test point? -Is this necessary?

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  Reply # 581355 14-Feb-2012 14:19
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I am rewiring an old house.  I noted on the discussion on this very informative topic that it is desirable to avoid routing the Ethernet cable alongside the power/lighting wiring.  In some circumstances, restricted access in an existing house will make this quite difficult for me.  Can anyone give me any guidelines on what is acceptable?  For instance, it won't be easy to avoid running both the power and data cables down from the ceiling to the outlets in the same stud to stud cavity.  (I have power points and data jacks located close together  by the sides of beds for instance.)  Is it possible to shield the cables or would 300mm separation be OK?

Regarding the question in the post just above, Chorus has informed me that their new Demarcation Point boxes have all the test jacks required and it is not necessary to add my own on the other side of the wall.

What maximum spacing is recommended for cable pin-clips for Cat5e?  Is joint to joist (450mm or so) OK?

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  Reply # 581359 14-Feb-2012 14:28
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Hi as you know you require 50mm minimum seperation between LV (<1000V) and SLV (data/phone/tv). So no you cannot use the same hole in a top plate or noggin. Also a termination (ie flush box for LV and SLV) must either be seperated by a solid barrier (ie stud ) or if no solid barrier must be 200mm apart.

Ideally and typically one mounts LV (power) on one side of a stud and SLV on the other, that way a solid barrier seperates the flush boxs, if you do put them in the same cavity (ie between studs) then they must be seperated by at least 200mm.

Hope that helps.

Cyril

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  Reply # 581392 14-Feb-2012 15:26
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PeterBC:  Chorus has informed me that their new Demarcation Point boxes have all the test jacks required and it is not necessary to add my own on the other side of the wall.


Thanks.

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  Reply # 581673 15-Feb-2012 09:41
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Thanks Cyril.  That was quick?

I have to admit that I hadn't appreciated that the separation was a safety requirement.  I was thinking about 50 Hz hum interference.  Will this be a problem if I have parallel runs of power/light and data/phone cables, even if I respect the 50mm separation requirement?  (My phone signal will go on the blue/white cable of the cat5e)

Will the solid seperation requirement be satisfied by 20x100mm plank?  The relatively narrow space between bedhead and bedside table doesn't co-incide with a stud very often.  After reading your reply I was wondering if constructing a box around the data flush-box would give me the needed flexibility?  Fortunately, the renovation is extensive enough that I have the linings off many of the walls concerned.

Will cat5e span the 450mm or so from joist to joist?

Off-topic a bit: I am told that now-days any extensive rewiring must have an RCD earth-leakage protection device installed on the board, to protect all circiuts.  (Seems like a great idea to me, I would do that even if it wasn't required)  Given that however, isn't all this overkill? 

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  Reply # 581698 15-Feb-2012 10:46
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Oh, another question.  Since data and power cables must cross, what do you need to do about electrical separation there?

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  Reply # 581719 15-Feb-2012 11:16
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Sorry. Double post.

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  Reply # 581782 15-Feb-2012 12:48
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Another bunch of questions I'm afraid.

I am considering using a slightly different approach.  From the patch panel I am running a single cat5e cable to each flushbox.  Two of the 4 pairs carry 10/100 Ethernet and the blue/white pair carries the phone signal.  (I don't see that I will want Gigabit, which would require another cable if it was desired to stick with wired phone jacks, for yonks, if ever.  I'll leave pullthrus, so, in the unlikely event that I ever need another cable, it can be done easily.)

I will be using rj11/rj45 cables for all of my phones and modems, so all jacks in the house will be rj45.

Each flushbox will have two rj45 keystone jacks, daisy-chained off the single cable.  I do not intend to use both jacks for data simultaneously, so will there will be any problem with this daisy-chaining?  The advantage is that either jack can be used for either phone or data.

The cat5e cable from the demark will have all conducters terminated at one jack of the patch panel (Only the blue/white pair is active).  The modem will be patched to this jack with rj11/rj45 cable.  The blue/white pair will be left long, so a filter can be connected, if required.

The next jack will be for the VOIP.  No cable will be attached to the back of this jack.  It will take its input by rj11/45 patch cable and will be jumpered  to the remaining internal cabling.  The jumper also will be left long to allow attachment to the filter, if used.

The remaining patch panel jacks will be attached to the internal cat5e cabling internally and patched to the router or switch as required, using standard Ethernet patch cables.

If VOIP is used, a filter isn't.  If traditional phone wiring is used, the VOIP socket is left empty.

I dont have a patch panel to examine at present.  Can I run the jumper to the jacks and then terminate all the conductors of each internal cable into their respective jacks normally, or will I have to do something different to star wire all the blue/white pairs from the VOIP jack?

Any comments on this approach?  

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  Reply # 581825 15-Feb-2012 13:48
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PeterBC: Another bunch of questions I'm afraid.

I am considering using a slightly different approach.  From the patch panel I am running a single cat5e cable to each flushbox.  Two of the 4 pairs carry 10/100 Ethernet and the blue/white pair carries the phone signal.  (I don't see that I will want Gigabit, which would require another cable if it was desired to stick with wired phone jacks, for yonks, if ever.  I'll leave pullthrus, so, in the unlikely event that I ever need another cable, it can be done easily.)

I will be using rj11/rj45 cables for all of my phones and modems, so all jacks in the house will be rj45.

Each flushbox will have two rj45 keystone jacks, daisy-chained off the single cable.  I do not intend to use both jacks for data simultaneously, so will there will be any problem with this daisy-chaining?  The advantage is that either jack can be used for either phone or data.

The cat5e cable from the demark will have all conducters terminated at one jack of the patch panel (Only the blue/white pair is active).  The modem will be patched to this jack with rj11/rj45 cable.  The blue/white pair will be left long, so a filter can be connected, if required.

The next jack will be for the VOIP.  No cable will be attached to the back of this jack.  It will take its input by rj11/45 patch cable and will be jumpered  to the remaining internal cabling.  The jumper also will be left long to allow attachment to the filter, if used.

The remaining patch panel jacks will be attached to the internal cat5e cabling internally and patched to the router or switch as required, using standard Ethernet patch cables.

If VOIP is used, a filter isn't.  If traditional phone wiring is used, the VOIP socket is left empty.

I dont have a patch panel to examine at present.  Can I run the jumper to the jacks and then terminate all the conductors of each internal cable into their respective jacks normally, or will I have to do something different to star wire all the blue/white pairs from the VOIP jack?

Any comments on this approach?  


Why do you only want to run one cable? To save a bit of coin? You think it might be easier? If you are going to all the effort to re-wire your place might as well do it properly. If you want a dual outlet, run two cables. At the moment splitting the cable may seem fine but I will guarantee you that in a couple of years you will be cursing and swearing because you have to run in a whole bunch more when you want a bit of gigabit around the place. It is just as easy to run two cables as it is to run one so dont cheap out when it comes to cable amounts. Hell I have 26 outlets (13 duals) in my small 3 bedroom home and then a sub-panel in the garage/sleepout with anoher 8 outlets -I want a couple more around the place some times. Splitting cables will make things unnecessarily complicated when it comes to patching. I was having trouble following your description of how you will go about it and I deal with this stuff on a daily basis.
In terms of separation from power, dont worry about when the cable crosses the power, thats what this twist in the pairs is for. And as for running parallel with power cables, as long as there decent separation you wont have any issues. For our bedside flush boxes, place the power flush box on the stud and then just mount the data in a wally box (spring loaded flush box thingy). To be honest though, it would be the end of the world if the outlets were behind the bed a bit would it? If it was me I would just be putting both of them on the stud. Its just easier.

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