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Topic # 93691 27-Nov-2011 10:46
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I have run Cat 6 to all locations I want plugs.

I have a network distribution cabinet in the garage where I will site my modem and phone services. I have a dedicated phone module with a xdsl filter and 4 ports for phone services.

I am considering two options.

1. Install a 24 port patch panel and 16 port gigabit switch

2. Install a 16 port gigabit switch and terminate all of the Cat 6 with RJ-45 plugs directly into the switch.

I can't see any advantage at this point in installing a patch panel for my set up. I am highly unlikely going to install any extra Cat 6 runs in the future, what I have now is how it will stay.

I am correct in thinking that for my set up a patch panel is a waste of time?

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  Reply # 550533 27-Nov-2011 10:59
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For use with just yourself terminating everything with RJ-45 plugs would make no difference but when you come to sell your house, It may put new owners off as it's rather messy compared to a patch panel.

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  Reply # 550538 27-Nov-2011 11:02
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Yes while a patch panel may seem redundant now I bet you at some point in the future for either you or a potential buyer in the future you will be glad you installed one. Same situation at our work, didn't think we would need patch panels but after 6 months we actually had a real need.





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  Reply # 550548 27-Nov-2011 11:45
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You'll also find that terminating rj45 plugs onto cat6 cable can be a real pain.
For the cost of a patch panel I would rather get that and then punch down instead. :)




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  Reply # 550549 27-Nov-2011 11:57
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How many circuits are their, you can get 12 port wall mount panels that may be more appropriate, see top middle in this link below. I agree with Cyabro, simply putting plugs on loose cables is a bit naff.

http://www.cablesdirect.co.nz/www/pdfs/scs68.pdf

Cyril

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  Reply # 550553 27-Nov-2011 12:51
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ALWAYS DO A PATCH PANEL!!!!!! For the sake of 50 bucks it is a no brainer. So much more tidy and easy to manage.

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  Reply # 550564 27-Nov-2011 13:54
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marmel: I have run Cat 6 to all locations I want plugs.

I have a network distribution cabinet in the garage where I will site my modem and phone services. I have a dedicated phone module with a xdsl filter and 4 ports for phone services.

I am considering two options.

1. Install a 24 port patch panel and 16 port gigabit switch

2. Install a 16 port gigabit switch and terminate all of the Cat 6 with RJ-45 plugs directly into the switch.

I can't see any advantage at this point in installing a patch panel for my set up. I am highly unlikely going to install any extra Cat 6 runs in the future, what I have now is how it will stay.

I am correct in thinking?that for my set up a patch panel is?a waste of time?
??????????????


Where did you get your advice from with installing a wired network. Have looked a t a few websites but they haven't really helped much. I am thinking of doing the same in a new build, just difficult to know how many connections I think I will need. I am guessing at least a couple behind the TV, and then a number distributed around the house. eg one in the kitchen, bedrooms, eg whereever you may want to watch a TV or connect a PC.

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  Reply # 550574 27-Nov-2011 14:25
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mattwnz:
marmel: I have run Cat 6 to all locations I want plugs.

I have a network distribution cabinet in the garage where I will site my modem and phone services. I have a dedicated phone module with a xdsl filter and 4 ports for phone services.

I am considering two options.

1. Install a 24 port patch panel and 16 port gigabit switch

2. Install a 16 port gigabit switch and terminate all of the Cat 6 with RJ-45 plugs directly into the switch.

I can't see any advantage at this point in installing a patch panel for my set up. I am highly unlikely going to install any extra Cat 6 runs in the future, what I have now is how it will stay.

I am correct in thinking?that for my set up a patch panel is?a waste of time?
??????????????


Where did you get your advice from with installing a wired network. Have looked a t a few websites but they haven't really helped much. I am thinking of doing the same in a new build, just difficult to know how many connections I think I will need. I am guessing at least a couple behind the TV, and then a number distributed around the house. eg one in the kitchen, bedrooms, eg whereever you may want to watch a TV or connect a PC.


Take a look at this:

http://www.tcf.org.nz/library/51eee964-eae7-4a02-83c0-f4ac6072b1f4.cmr 







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  Reply # 550597 27-Nov-2011 16:01
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OK sounds like the patch panel is the way to go, thanks for the input.


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  Reply # 550607 27-Nov-2011 16:43
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CYaBro: You'll also find that terminating rj45 plugs onto cat6 cable can be a real pain.
For the cost of a patch panel I would rather get that and then punch down instead. :)

+1

And you need to ensure that any plugs on solid cable are suitable for solid, otherwise plugs designed for stranded will be really flaky later on due to the wrong type of pins. And don't expect labelling you write directly onto cable sheaths to be easy to follow, even if you are the only one that ever has to troubleshoot a problem connection or patch it across to some new voice ATA or other equipment you pickup in future.

My general rule of thumb is that permanent links should be permanent, while changeable links should be convenient to repatch or test whenever you need to.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 550614 27-Nov-2011 16:54
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Zeon:
mattwnz:
marmel: I have run Cat 6 to all locations I want plugs.

I have a network distribution cabinet in the garage where I will site my modem and phone services. I have a dedicated phone module with a xdsl filter and 4 ports for phone services.

I am considering two options.

1. Install a 24 port patch panel and 16 port gigabit switch

2. Install a 16 port gigabit switch and terminate all of the Cat 6 with RJ-45 plugs directly into the switch.

I can't see any advantage at this point in installing a patch panel for my set up. I am highly unlikely going to install any extra Cat 6 runs in the future, what I have now is how it will stay.

I am correct in thinking?that for my set up a patch panel is?a waste of time?
??????????????


Where did you get your advice from with installing a wired network. Have looked a t a few websites but they haven't really helped much. I am thinking of doing the same in a new build, just difficult to know how many connections I think I will need. I am guessing at least a couple behind the TV, and then a number distributed around the house. eg one in the kitchen, bedrooms, eg whereever you may want to watch a TV or connect a PC.


Take a look at this:

http://www.tcf.org.nz/library/51eee964-eae7-4a02-83c0-f4ac6072b1f4.cmr?


Thanks, that's very useful



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  Reply # 550650 27-Nov-2011 19:11
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webwat:
CYaBro: You'll also find that terminating rj45 plugs onto cat6 cable can be a real pain.
For the cost of a patch panel I would rather get that and then punch down instead. :)

+1

And you need to ensure that any plugs on solid cable are suitable for solid, otherwise plugs designed for stranded will be really flaky later on due to the wrong type of pins. And don't expect labelling you write directly onto cable sheaths to be easy to follow, even if you are the only one that ever has to troubleshoot a problem connection or patch it across to some new voice ATA or other equipment you pickup in future.

My general rule of thumb is that permanent links should be permanent, while changeable links should be convenient to repatch or test whenever you need to.


Yeah I ordered the correct plugs for Cat 6 solid. They come with inserts as well which makes it a bit easier. I also invested in a RJ-45 crimper, cable tester and punch down tool.


I have also labelled everything with a Brother label machine so it should be fairly straight forward.

I will take a few pics when I get my patch panel and switch installed. 

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  Reply # 550668 27-Nov-2011 20:06
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webwat:

My general rule of thumb is that permanent links should be permanent, while changeable links should be convenient to repatch or test whenever you need to.


+1

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  Reply # 550703 27-Nov-2011 22:21
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mattwnz:
marmel: I have run Cat 6 to all locations I want plugs.

I have a network distribution cabinet in the garage where I will site my modem and phone services. I have a dedicated phone module with a xdsl filter and 4 ports for phone services.

I am considering two options.

1. Install a 24 port patch panel and 16 port gigabit switch

2. Install a 16 port gigabit switch and terminate all of the Cat 6 with RJ-45 plugs directly into the switch.

I can't see any advantage at this point in installing a patch panel for my set up. I am highly unlikely going to install any extra Cat 6 runs in the future, what I have now is how it will stay.

I am correct in thinking?that for my set up a patch panel is?a waste of time?
??????????????


Where did you get your advice from with installing a wired network. Have looked a t a few websites but they haven't really helped much. I am thinking of doing the same in a new build, just difficult to know how many connections I think I will need. I am guessing at least a couple behind the TV, and then a number distributed around the house. eg one in the kitchen, bedrooms, eg whereever you may want to watch a TV or connect a PC.


Its not really too hard to figure out how many outlets you will need. Entertainment for example, you might have a sky decoder, xbox, internet tv and media pc so that is four outlets. Just do that for each room. Could I suggest in bedrooms even though you will probably only plug a phone in run two cables anyway. It is cheap enough and so so much easier to put in when there is no gib in the way. You dont need to fit them all off now but in the future it will be a piece of cake to add an outlet. I think the tcf say run two cat5e & two coax and then for future proofing put conduit down the framing. Personally i think if you are going to go to the effort of putting conduit up the wall why not just run a bloody cable. its cheaper lol.

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  Reply # 550749 28-Nov-2011 07:30
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Hi, and dont forget to run a feed to any wall mounted TV's, so at approx 1200mm off the floor, a GPO, plus one RG6 and one cat5e/6, all TV's now have builtin media clients and even though many are currently a bit lame expect that to change.

Edit, also worth thinking about Wifeless distribution, typically I run a feed up high in the pantry or above the fridge (along with a GPO) to site a Wireless AP and if its a large house maybe one in a hall closet (again up high with a GPO) to allow coverage at the far end of the house if needed.

Also its worth thinking about if you have a combined router/WiFi AP that the primary one in the kitchen has two feeds, that way you can send WAN (or DSL) to it and return the LAN to then distribute from the home hub ethernet switch.

Cyril

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