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  Reply # 570096 17-Jan-2012 19:19
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Hi, as I said originally the primary cause of DSL disconnects is POTS devices (phones) not being correctly filtered, so either the filter on the cordless phone is faulty or some other device in the house is causing an issue by not being correctly filtered (which means correctly isolated in the DSL band).

What happens if you put two DSL filters in concatenation between the cordless basestation and the line.

Cyril

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  Reply # 570097 17-Jan-2012 19:20
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DSL dropping when the phone is used is typically a filter issue. Hissing on the line is possibly the DSL in the background which you would only hear if you had no filter, or a broken/incorrectly installed filter.


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  Reply # 570103 17-Jan-2012 19:34
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Like cyril says that is a DECT phone. Buying a new one won't fix your problem. The symptoms you describe point straight at the filtering. The audio on those phones isnt the best for starters but the sound you can probably here is the adsl (a constant static noise). That means it isn't getting filtered out before it gets to your phone. I would just put a splitter in. Like cyril says it will cost atleast $200 from your isp (probably more). I don't know what retail is (we buy them for 15-20), i think it would be around 30-40 at any electrical store. It will be called an xDSL splitter and will be ready for vdsl. There are 3 pairs sticking out of it. The orange wire joins to the incoming line. The blue goes to your phone and the green goes to the modem. When you are buying the splitter get a jar of 'scotch locks'. You can get 2 or 3 port joiners. You probably just need 2-ports but if they dont have 2-ports 3-ports are fine, you just use 2. So back to the firts bit. Incoming line. Look around outside for a telecom etp (little white box). I dont know the age of your house but it could also be a flush tin plate. If there isnt one outside then the incoming line goes to a jack. Uncsrew them until you find it. The black cable coming up from the ground is obviously the incoming. cut the incoming away from whatever it is joined to. Leave the old connectors on the internal cable so that they are still easy to identify. 2-port the orange pair on the splitter to the incoming. Now join the blue wire to whatever was joined to the incoming. At this point your adsl should have dropped out and your phone will be going. Now the green wire should be sticking out doing nothing. You have two options here. If it is easy to do, run a new cable from the etp to wherever your modem is. (This is my favourite option). If not things could get hard. You can use the spare pairs in your internal wiring but make sure they are spare and clean. You will have to start at the etp and work your way through the jacks (joining the pairs through with 2-ports) until you get to where you want to put the modem. This is quite hard to do without a tone source and a decent knowledge of your wiring. Hence, option one is my favourite. So yea, hook up the green wire and plug the modem in. Should sort out all your problems.

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  Reply # 570241 18-Jan-2012 08:00
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Hi as per my PM if you want a kit of bits to do a master filter install then just say so, I have provided quite a number to GZ members over the years.

Cyril



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  Reply # 570327 18-Jan-2012 11:48
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Not sure of my rights as far a telephones go but I have contacted Telstra Clear and highlighted that my phone is unusable with this sound on the line. I pay wire maintenance each month and have been a faithful customer (god knows they have tried to get rid of me with there appalling customer service) so I will see what happens.

Thanks for all the suggestions. Whilst I believe I could do the wiring I am nervous about the legality of me doing it. If it was just the inside white box (Socket RJ12 I think), I would not mind. We have 5 unused ones and therefore the risk is low. Maybe if I can no joy from Telstra (who does) I may try what people have suggested.

Iain

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  Reply # 570334 18-Jan-2012 11:57
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Hi, wiring maintenance will not cover the installation of a central filter, so I dont think you will get any joy there.

It is not illegal to work on house phone wiring yourself as long as you stay your side of the demarc. As mentioned in the PM and by others where is the demarc, does the leadin just appear at a socket or is their an ETP (white box on side of house) where the leadin transitions.

Cyril



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  Reply # 570342 18-Jan-2012 12:16
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I am not expecting Telsra to fit a filter, my expectation is you get a clear telephone service, how they resolve that is their issue (hopefully) and in my view their responsibility. They are also my internet provider and I have used their filter and clearly it does not work as expected. I think it is reasonable to expect to be able to use there broadband whilst on the telephone which I cannot. If I was discussing download speeds and the fact it was poor due to the filter then I might see it as my responsibility. (BTW not bagging you, you have all been a great help), it is just so frustrating.

On the wiring front I will check tonight how it is connected to the house. I live in old whitby.

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  Reply # 570353 18-Jan-2012 12:59
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I would still pick the issue being something dodgy with your home wiring, and most probably an incorrectly fitted or broken filter. If this is the case there isn't a lot TelstraClear can really do, as filters are the responsibility of the homeowner, not your ISP.

Wiring maintenance will cover a fault in your home wiring if there is one, but if your issue is one of say a dodgy self install filter you do run the risk of the Chorus tech charging you for the callout. Some may just mark the job as a wiring issue so you don't have to pay, but they are under no obligation to do this.

  

  

  



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  Reply # 570383 18-Jan-2012 14:16
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How can you fit a filter incorrectly? It may be that I am not understanding something correctly. I can't see it myself but it does happen to the best of people. It is always a good idea to confirm so ....

I have two sockets RJ12 sockect I think you call them
The ADSL modem/router, a TD-W8960N is plugged in one with no fllter just a RJ45 convertor
The phone base station is plugged into a separate RJ12.
The telephone has a filter and have tried
- The filter provided with a standard telstraclear kit
- The TP-Link filter
- Two other brands of filters
- Two filters together
- The telephone lead first, then the filter
- The filter then the telephone lead

All produce a hissing sound.


Remember this worked prior to ~Aug 2011 with no issues.

Since august I have
- Changed router, this used to be a linksys WRT54G
- Not changed the phone
- Download speeds has increased from ~200 to ~500
- Fitted a 1G switch for the network
- Added lots of wireless devices, two iPod touches, 1 Nokia C6-00, a BCM4311 802.11b/g WLAN (rev 02) usb stick

I am guessing things to try might be
- Unplug router and see if hissing stops
- Plug in lan cables one at a time to see if feedback caused by lan cables (guessing)
- Change RJ12 for phone, I have 3 others unused
- Change RJ12 for router

Arggggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
(I'm OK now)


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  Reply # 570386 18-Jan-2012 14:20
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umm as asked before can you provide the line stats from the modem, just log into the modem via web browser it should be 192.168.1.1, then naviagate to the line stats, I cannot remember the interface exactly but there should be a status page displaying line attenuation, sync rate, etc etc.

Cyril



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  Reply # 570396 18-Jan-2012 14:38
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There are lots but here are the ones I think you want

                                     Down       Up
Line Coding(Trellis):        On           On  
SNR Margin (0.1 dB):       162          147
Attenuation (0.1 dB):       120          66
Output Power (0.1 dBm):  0            128
Attainable Rate (Kbps):    9316       632




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  Reply # 570402 18-Jan-2012 14:46
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You can see the stats at http://www.bibble.co.nz/scratch/stats.png

Iain

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  Reply # 570406 18-Jan-2012 14:51
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Hi, so looking at the png pick you have 12dB downstream attenuation and only 5.5Mb/s which is 30% of what should be, I also note its on full power upstream which is probably why you can hear it hissing.

I would suggest you have a rats nest of wiring thats a major part of this, clear that up then see if it helps, then put it back on TCL/Chrous.

Cyril



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  Reply # 570414 18-Jan-2012 14:59
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Which wiring?

I assume you mean the RJ12 socket. If it is then do I just open the box and check the cables. If not what should I do?

And would a good outcome be 16.5 Mb/s and that is it or are there other things to check.

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  Reply # 570418 18-Jan-2012 15:03
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Hi, refering to the whole house phone wiring, which I why I asked earlier about identify where the line enters the house, then from there you can rationlise what is needed and what is not and wire it in a more suitable manner, that may or may not require a master filter.

Also standard phone sockets in NZ are not RJ12 but BT.

Cyril

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