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136 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1326684 17-Jun-2015 16:48
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Sorry if its been discussed before. Can these be used in recessed downlights or will they overheat?

Thanks

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1326893 17-Jun-2015 23:33
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I had some cool/warm ones in some e27 downlights for ages with no failures.




Richard rich.ms

216 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1327559 18-Jun-2015 22:04
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WaffleMakerMan: will they overheat?
  No they are not likely to overheat, they are designed for recessed b22 and e27 fittings, (they are good even in worst cases like under glass domes sideways on the roof), we could run our 9W bulbs at 12W but we like to keep the headroom for stability and longevity. we still replace any bulbs under warranty that are in recessed fittings. limitlessled bridges and bulbs are currently sitting at a very low 0.8% return rate, which is pretty damn amazing for electronics technology.
Heres an interesting quote from a 2013 article...


Much to the chagrin of retailers, between 11 to 20% of the millions of consumer electronics items purchased weekly will be returned to the store. (source: Accenture) At that clip, consumer electronics have the highest return rate of any product (even above apparel). And it’s costly too. In 2011, consumer electronic returns cost retailers close to $17 billion. (source: Accenture)  You may be asking yourself why the return rate is so high for popular gadgets. As it turns out, patience is a virtue.

Most gadgets returned to the store actually work exactly like they are supposed to, but are brought back due to… impatience. Yes, most of those people returning gadgets have spent an average 20 minutes (source: Technical University of Eindhoven)  trying to figure out how to work a gadget before giving up, getting frustrated, and returning it to the store or online outlet they purchased it from. Another factor for returning a product is buyer’s remorse. While it is easy to impulsively buy a gadget in the store, guilty feelings often bring someone back into the store. Whether it’s buyer’s remorse or product frustration, billions of dollars of consumer electronics merchandise are coming back to retailers in functionally and cosmetically perfect condition.

218 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1327841 19-Jun-2015 13:15
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Some months back I bought 2 lights and a controller. One light 'whistled' a high frequency, and was annoying, and the wattages are too low to use in anything but a desklamp. They are now consigned to the bottom of the wardrobe.

Brighter better lights would make it an interesting toy but until then its not very practical.

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  Reply # 1327866 19-Jun-2015 14:18
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netspanner: Some months back I bought 2 lights and a controller. One light 'whistled' a high frequency, and was annoying, and the wattages are too low to use in anything but a desklamp. They are now consigned to the bottom of the wardrobe.

Brighter better lights would make it an interesting toy but until then its not very practical.


Thats unlucky. Ive got 11 (or 12) bulbs and they are fine. Several are over a year old.

I did find my first two dual white bulbs to be too dim (these were 7.5W from memory). The newer 9W bulbs are much brighter but I still find them not strong enough for our main (pendant) lights in the lounge. They are fine for bedrooms, table lamps and exterior lights though which are my main applications.





243 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1327922 19-Jun-2015 16:41
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hmm I don't see a point in wifi bulbs to save a few seconds of getting off the couch to hit a switch

Unless you can set them up to turn automatically when someone enters a room/opens a door ? that might be useful

I have often thought about walking through my house and having the lights follow me as go

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1327927 19-Jun-2015 16:56
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bongojona:...

I have often thought about walking through my house and having the lights follow me as go
  I tried this with a combination of reid switches and PIR motion detectors.   It was harder than I thought... Turns out that tracking humans is a PITA.

I mostly use mine with a combination of manual control from remotes/apps and timers.   The timers throw lights into off/night mode when people should be asleep anyway, so that if you get up there is a twilight to get to the bathroom in.  They turn on as an alarm clock in the mornings, with an auto-off by the time it should be light/going to work anyway.




Warning: reality may differ from above post

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  Reply # 1327928 19-Jun-2015 17:01
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I wrote an android app that's turns my lights on and off automatically. It turns on the lights in the lounge at 6am when I wake up, control the exterior lights and turns the kids bedroom lights onto night light mode at 9pm.

Best thing is not coming home to a dark house in winter.

165 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1327955 19-Jun-2015 17:21
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I have a similar setup to qyiet and tchart but with a couple of twists. 
In the morning, a timer turns on the hallway light just before anyone gets up and puts my bedroom lights on dim just before my clock radio turns on in the morning. They get brighter every minute as I wake up with the radio, until the 2nd alarm (beeps) on my clock radio goes off, by which point it's too bright to go back to sleep and I get up.

After everyone's go to work times, the hallway light goes off by timer.

Regardless of the timers, when I leave the house, my bedroom lights turn off as soon as my phone drops off the wifi and when I come home, as soon as my phone joins the wifi, my bedroom & hallway lights both turn on. 9 times out of 10, the lights come on before I get as far as the hallway to drop my bag off in my room.

When others who have bedrooms off the hallway come home, their phones joining the wifi also cause the hallway light to turn on and timers repeatedly set it to nightlight mode during the night, so if someone comes home late, it won't stay on all night. I'm thinking about getting an RGBW for the entrance hall which would go to different colours as a way of greeting different people, (regular friends included!) but the RGBW have very monotonic colours that make it hard to see when taking off your shoes etc. Would be better if we could mix white with colours, more like the output of Philips Hue.

I've used a database to schedule timed events via a web interface (they can be set to repeat automatically) and a 1minute cron job executes scheduled tasks and queries the wifi over snmp for a list of client mac addresses. 

Finally, I found that my wifi bridge tended to drop off the wifi quite regularly,  so ripped out the wifi module and linked the remaining zigbee board (that talks to the lights) to an arduino with ethernet running some code that emulates the wifi bridge so that the official apps work transparently through it.

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  Reply # 1327973 19-Jun-2015 18:19
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bongojona: hmm I don't see a point in wifi bulbs to save a few seconds of getting off the couch to hit a switch

Unless you can set them up to turn automatically when someone enters a room/opens a door ? that might be useful

I have often thought about walking through my house and having the lights follow me as go


You have remotes too.

I found the wifi gateways (both versions) too flakey to bother with. Not sure if it was the phone, the gateway, the wifi or whatever but it would often lag.

But the physical remotes are great.

I would like to have a _reliable_ wired ethernet gateway that was not limited to a single group of 4 zones. Or a DMX gateway that would do a whole house lot off one DMX line.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 1327996 19-Jun-2015 18:27
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RmACK: I have a similar setup to qyiet and tchart but with a couple of twists. 
In the morning, a timer turns on the hallway light just before anyone gets up and puts my bedroom lights on dim just before my clock radio turns on in the morning. They get brighter every minute as I wake up with the radio, until the 2nd alarm (beeps) on my clock radio goes off, by which point it's too bright to go back to sleep and I get up.

After everyone's go to work times, the hallway light goes off by timer.

Regardless of the timers, when I leave the house, my bedroom lights turn off as soon as my phone drops off the wifi and when I come home, as soon as my phone joins the wifi, my bedroom & hallway lights both turn on. 9 times out of 10, the lights come on before I get as far as the hallway to drop my bag off in my room.

When others who have bedrooms off the hallway come home, their phones joining the wifi also cause the hallway light to turn on and timers repeatedly set it to nightlight mode during the night, so if someone comes home late, it won't stay on all night. I'm thinking about getting an RGBW for the entrance hall which would go to different colours as a way of greeting different people, (regular friends included!) but the RGBW have very monotonic colours that make it hard to see when taking off your shoes etc. Would be better if we could mix white with colours, more like the output of Philips Hue.

I've used a database to schedule timed events via a web interface (they can be set to repeat automatically) and a 1minute cron job executes scheduled tasks and queries the wifi over snmp for a list of client mac addresses. 

Finally, I found that my wifi bridge tended to drop off the wifi quite regularly,  so ripped out the wifi module and linked the remaining zigbee board (that talks to the lights) to an arduino with ethernet running some code that emulates the wifi bridge so that the official apps work transparently through it.


RmACK, are you controlling your lights using a linux server? How are you interfacing with the bridge? UDP or have you hard wired a bridge?

165 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1328002 19-Jun-2015 18:49
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Yes, the server runs Ubuntu.

It sends UDP packets to the Arduino which forwards the first two bytes out of a UART (serial) pin. I've connected this pin to the UART input pin of the Zigbee chip in my Limitless Wifi bridge. (I have removed the Wifi to UART PCB from the Limitless bridge completely). I used a voltage divider to level shift the 5V Arduino UART output down to the 3V3 input of the Zigbee.

The Arduino is basically an Ethernet to UART bridge, replacing the Wifi to UART bridge that came with the Limitless box. 

A 2nd UDP server on the Arduino responds to broadcast packets on a different UDP port that the Limitless app uses to discover bridges, so my Adruino shows up in the limitless app. 

261 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1328092 19-Jun-2015 20:22
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I have a couple of remote dual whites in my bedroom so I can put a tall wide cupboard over the light switch. Technology enabling me to be lazy and not re-arrange the furniture. Yes!

216 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1328099 19-Jun-2015 20:53
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Yes we found that too in about 10% of homes due to bonjour and dhcp packets being broadcast with certain bytes in it, that would put the wifi bridge into a state where it thought the rest of the packet was still coming, and would look like a freeze until the packet header timed out.  We have fixed that now. if you send an email to support at limitlessled we will send you a free replacement latest wifi bridge for you to test, you can keep the other one without sending it back. We are aiming for a very stable wifi bridge, and need feedback on our latest bridges. Our testing shows no faults and no lags. happy to send out latest bridges for anyone to try, might be good also so that you have a spare one you can use for ethernet to uart, and one for wifi.

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  Reply # 1328165 20-Jun-2015 02:26
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Is that something that is software updateable at all?




Richard rich.ms

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