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  # 1347853 20-Jul-2015 17:37
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I stay with my original comment, it is probably so you can manually adjust the output slightly up/down to correct for fluctuations in the mains supply.

Being 60Hz, it will not perform optimal at 50Hz but should still be okay.  I am an electronic engineer sand can't remember exactly what you do, think you derate the current rating, maybe an electrician (or electrical engineer) can comment.




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  # 1348077 20-Jul-2015 23:06
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There is a danger that it is not a 'real' transformer but actually is a large switched mode power supply. How heavy is the thing?
Can you remove the lid and take some photos?

If it is a 'real' transformer then you should still be able to use it at 50Hz, if it is a SWPSU then things are a bit riskier.

 
 
 
 




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  # 1349601 22-Jul-2015 00:42
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Rikkitic: If it's 220v in and 220 out then it is just an isolation transformer. I note your text says 60 hertz but on your image it says 50 hertz so these may not refer to the same transformer.



Interesting. Didn't even know what an isolated transformer was used for before having to google it.



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  # 1349602 22-Jul-2015 00:44
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elpenguino: There is a danger that it is not a 'real' transformer but actually is a large switched mode power supply. How heavy is the thing?
Can you remove the lid and take some photos?

If it is a 'real' transformer then you should still be able to use it at 50Hz, if it is a SWPSU then things are a bit riskier.


I opened it once to see how dirty/dusty it was inside (it was fairly clean) but can confirm that it is pretty much the same as this image:

https://cdn.geekzone.co.nz/imagessubs/d744413fcb199617dacda92d62ca834f.jpg

Weight wise I would say the 6.8kg mentioned in the brochure is pretty accurate. Would be interested to hear what you think it might actually be?


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  # 1349778 22-Jul-2015 13:26
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It appears to have about as many taps on the transformer as there are switches on the dial. My guess here, and from the ocr'd specs, is that it is essentially a discrete variac, each switch position giving a different V AC, probably not a large variation only sufficient to enable you to get close to 220v output within a small variation of input (190-240).

I would guess that the sequence 1 2 3 4 is probably for reducing increasng the output voltage, the sequence 1 2 for increasing decreasing, the one between them with wring on it is probably 1:1, who knows about the blank position (maybe it is off).

Edit: 190v to 220v is 30v, while 240v to 220v is only 20v, so would stand to reason the larger sequence range is for boosting.

I'd say that if you plug it in, you'd find the voltmeter will show the output voltage and turning the dial will show it change :-)






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  # 1349829 22-Jul-2015 14:51
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I would agree with sleemanj. 60Hz design and 50Hz use is unlikely to be much of an issue for you, but use it for smaller (lower power) loads than the 60Hz spec.

I wouldn't guarantee it is an isolation transformer without testing it myself, but it looks like it.

After all that, what are you going to do with it?



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  # 1350413 23-Jul-2015 13:50
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sleemanj: It appears to have about as many taps on the transformer as there are switches on the dial. My guess here, and from the ocr'd specs, is that it is essentially a discrete variac, each switch position giving a different V AC, probably not a large variation only sufficient to enable you to get close to 220v output within a small variation of input (190-240).

I would guess that the sequence 1 2 3 4 is probably for reducing increasng the output voltage, the sequence 1 2 for increasing decreasing, the one between them with wring on it is probably 1:1, who knows about the blank position (maybe it is off).

Edit: 190v to 220v is 30v, while 240v to 220v is only 20v, so would stand to reason the larger sequence range is for boosting.

I'd say that if you plug it in, you'd find the voltmeter will show the output voltage and turning the dial will show it change :-)




Makes logical sense. I just realised that the photo of the internals is the same for all three models on the brochure, so I will probably take an actual photo and post here. Would it be possible for the company to use the same fundamental parts, I guess as you say Variac, and then produce 3 versions, being a step up, step down and isolating transformer, or is it more complicated than that requiring very different parts/construction?

 
 
 
 




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  # 1350414 23-Jul-2015 13:52
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elpenguino: After all that, what are you going to do with it?


To be honest I don't even now what an isolating transformer is used for in practice. So I don't know if I will be doing anything with it! (I read it has to do with safety)

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  # 1350419 23-Jul-2015 14:00
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Hatch: I guess as you say Variac, and then produce 3 versions, being a step up, step down and isolating transformer, or is it more complicated than that requiring very different parts/construction?


For AC to AC without changing the frequency, it really is just a transformer (the big round thing in the middle), stepping up, down, or variable is just the number of turns and taps (connections into) in the transformer, so yes the internals could well be very similar, the'd probably just swap out the transformer (the big coil of wire in the middle) for a different one (look the same but different turn ratios) for the different models.





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  # 1350421 23-Jul-2015 14:05
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An isolating transformer has it's uses, but it has mostly been superseded by double insulated appliances and RCD's.

It's purpose is to isolate the power output from the supply and also earth. In practice, you can take the phase from an isolating transformer, drop it into a puddle and nothing will happen. The only way to get a shock off one (assuming it is in good working condition) is to touch both phase and neutral.

Edit: What sleemanj said below too!




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  # 1350430 23-Jul-2015 14:23
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Just note that this one may or may not be isolating, so treat is as not.





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  # 1350888 24-Jul-2015 00:35
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My guess is that it it just an auto transformer. Which means that the output is NOT isolated from the input. Reason I think it is an auto transformer - I have a 220V to 240V auto transformer that is of a similar size and also rated at 2KW. And an isolating transformer that is way larger than your one. Yet is only rated to 1.5KW

Be careful with the 60Hz compared to 50Hz. As 60Hz transformers don't need as much inductance as 50Hz ones. So if you try to use it on 50Hz it might get too hot. And in extreme cases the core will saturate, Which will mean that the transformer will short the mains.

It might be fine if only used in short bursts. But if you do need to use it continuously, Plug it in for an hour or so. Don't connect any load to the output. Watch it for any signs / smells of overheating. Then unplug it and open up the case to see how hot the transformer is. You might be lucky in that it might have enough inductance for 50Hz operation.





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