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4 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 223369 26-Sep-2017 10:54
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I'm replacing some of my light switches with smart switches which support 50Hz 230V. They are meant to connect to the wires with twist nuts which are quite common in the US but not in NZ. I've read through the full domestic electrical standards guide for NZ and didn't see anything about if these can be used in NZ. My other question is about flush boxes. Are they required? Most of the ones you buy here are just for mounting the switch and not actually enclosed. In the US all connections must be made within a flush box but most things here just leaving the wires loose in the wall cavity. This doesn't seem safe to me. I just want to make sure I'm up to code and not causing any potential insurance issues. Also do I need to get my work inspected by an electrician if I'm just swapping switches? The code seems to only require this with new wiring.

 

Thanks

 

 


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  Reply # 1872960 26-Sep-2017 10:59
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You need block connectors. If my mind serves me well twist nuts are illegal in NZ.
Do not touch any 2 or 3 way lighting arrangements. Just single point switched feeds.
Label the feed and the loop etc. Only replace like for like.

You must have a flushbox or mounting arrangement. You can use C clamp mounting plates for gib only walls.
It is illegal to have connectors exposed. So they must be inside an accessible junction box. It is illegal to conceal any form of connector. It must be crimped and heat shrinked.

Should cover it?

 

^Ex domestic Sparkie of 1 year... 




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1872985 26-Sep-2017 11:37
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Thanks for the reply. So as long as I use a connector block or screw loop in a flush box and  just replace like for like I don't need to get my work inspected by a sparky?

 

Cheers

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1872989 26-Sep-2017 11:42
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delroynitz:

 

Thanks for the reply. So as long as I use a connector block or screw loop in a flush box and  just replace like for like I don't need to get my work inspected by a sparky?

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can't advise if the work you are doing requires sign off or a code of compliance. 
But stick with close end connectors.

 


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  Reply # 1873016 26-Sep-2017 12:26
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delroynitz:

 

Thanks for the reply. So as long as I use a connector block or screw loop in a flush box and  just replace like for like I don't need to get my work inspected by a sparky?

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't know the answer but have previously been referred here which might help:  http://www.energysafety.govt.nz/consumer/safe-living-with-electricity/getting-electrical-work-done/doing-your-own-electrical-work

 

My lay person understanding is that you can replace like for like, but anything new must be certified.  

 

  • Ensure that if you install, extend or alter cables, you do not connect your work to the electricity supply yourself.  The finished job must be checked and tested by a licensed electrical inspector.  If it complies with safety requirements, the inspector will connect it, test it, and issue you with a Certificate of Compliance




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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Geek
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  Reply # 1873018 26-Sep-2017 12:27
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delroynitz:

 

Thanks for the reply. So as long as I use a connector block or screw loop in a flush box and  just replace like for like I don't need to get my work inspected by a sparky?

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

I don't think you'll ever get a definitive answer to your inspection question.

 

Btw, a sparky is not enough for the inspection, it needs to be a certified Electrical Inspector.

 

Some say yes, some say no, the opinions vary.

 

 


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  Reply # 1873029 26-Sep-2017 12:53
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Good luck getting a sparky to certify your work. I think you’ll find you’ll get laughed at and/or charged an amount equivalent to a sparky doing the work from the outset. Are there certificates of conformity (SDOC) available for what you’re installing?

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  Reply # 1873032 26-Sep-2017 12:55
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Suckerpunch:

 

delroynitz:

 

Thanks for the reply. So as long as I use a connector block or screw loop in a flush box and  just replace like for like I don't need to get my work inspected by a sparky?

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

I don't think you'll ever get a definitive answer to your inspection question.

 

Btw, a sparky is not enough for the inspection, it needs to be a certified Electrical Inspector.

 

Some say yes, some say no, the opinions vary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You only need a certified inspector when you are installing switchboards and other crucial components. Any qualified sparkie can do a COC for work like that. If you've been billed otherwise someones taken you for a ride! 
Generally those ones are sparkies/inspectors themselves and run a conjob. 


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  Reply # 1873043 26-Sep-2017 13:00
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MadEngineer: Good luck getting a sparky to certify your work. I think you’ll find you’ll get laughed at and/or charged an amount equivalent to a sparky doing the work from the outset. Are there certificates of compliance available for what you’re installing?

 

 

 

If he is just swapping like for like its a tough one but shouldn't need a COC. No sparkie will ever sign off on someone else work lol. Why would you or I risk our livelyhood for someone else work?


 

 


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  Reply # 1873069 26-Sep-2017 14:07
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Coil:

 

MadEngineer: Good luck getting a sparky to certify your work. I think you’ll find you’ll get laughed at and/or charged an amount equivalent to a sparky doing the work from the outset. Are there certificates of compliance available for what you’re installing?

 

 

 

If he is just swapping like for like its a tough one but shouldn't need a COC. No sparkie will ever sign off on someone else work lol. Why would you or I risk our livelyhood for someone else work?

 

 

 

 

The bigger problem is the SDOC for the components. If these don't exist (which it sounds like they don't) then there is no way to certify the work.


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1873073 26-Sep-2017 14:16
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Coil:

If he is just swapping like for like its a tough one but shouldn't need a COC. No sparkie will ever sign off on someone else work lol. Why would you or I risk our livelyhood for someone else work?



 



While I agree with you generally, as food for thought, isn't a mechanic doing this every time he signs off on a WOF for a vehicle?



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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1873074 26-Sep-2017 14:18
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I'm going to say no to the SDOC 

 

ANISI/UL STD 1472

 

CAN/CSA STD c22.2 #184.1

 

 


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  Reply # 1873075 26-Sep-2017 14:18
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Handle9:

 

Coil:

 

MadEngineer: Good luck getting a sparky to certify your work. I think you’ll find you’ll get laughed at and/or charged an amount equivalent to a sparky doing the work from the outset. Are there certificates of compliance available for what you’re installing?

 

 

 

If he is just swapping like for like its a tough one but shouldn't need a COC. No sparkie will ever sign off on someone else work lol. Why would you or I risk our livelyhood for someone else work?

 

 

 

 

The bigger problem is the SDOC for the components. If these don't exist (which it sounds like they don't) then there is no way to certify the work.

 

 

 

 

I would expect the OP to only be using compliant components and should be fully aware that if their house burns down with these devices in it they can expect $0.0000000 from the insurance company.


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  Reply # 1873076 26-Sep-2017 14:22
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Ge0rge:
Coil:

 

If he is just swapping like for like its a tough one but shouldn't need a COC. No sparkie will ever sign off on someone else work lol. Why would you or I risk our livelyhood for someone else work?


 

 

 

 

 



While I agree with you generally, as food for thought, isn't a mechanic doing this every time he signs off on a WOF for a vehicle?

 

 

 

A mechanic is inspecting a vehicle as it is where it is to verify whether it is up to safety standards and wear components are with in factory tolerance. There is no legal requirement for sign off on vehicle components. 


I firmly believe they need to have some for of COC on car brakes and airbag systems. When I worked for a certain dealership an apprentice did some brake carrier bolts up hand tight then went on smoko. That apprentice is currently in jail for man slaughter.. 


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  Reply # 1873181 26-Sep-2017 15:46
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There's a saying, people know not to do their own plumbing for fear of literally landing themselves in the poop yet have no fear of doing their own electrical at the risk of a painful death.

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  Reply # 1873210 26-Sep-2017 16:15
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This is what the Electrical safety regs say:-

 

-----------------------------

 

57 Exemption for domestic electrical wiring work
(1) A person who carries out prescribed electrical work in reliance on the exemption
in section 79 of the Act (exemption for domestic electrical wiring work)
must carry it out, and test the work, in accordance with ECP 51.
(2) For the purposes of section 79(1)(a) of the Act, the domestic electrical wiring
work that an owner of premises may do is work of any type described in subclause
(3) on a domestic installation that has a maximum demand at or below—
(a) 80 amperes per phase if single-phase; or
(b) 50 amperes per phase if multi-phase.
(3) The work to which subclause (2) relates is any of the following:
(a) removing and replacing fuse links:
(b) connecting and disconnecting fixed-wired appliances:
(c) relocating existing switches, socket-outlets, and lighting outlets that are
supplied with electricity by tough plastic-sheathed cables:
(d) removing and replacing any of the following kinds of fittings (but only if
the work does not involve work on a switchboard):
(i) switches, socket-outlets, and light fittings:
(ii) permanent connection units, ceiling roses, cord-grip lampholders,
and flexible cords connected to any of them:
(iii) batten holders:
(iv) water heater switches:
(v) thermostats:
(vi) elements:
(e) installing, extending, and altering subcircuits (including submains), but
only if—
(i) the person does not enter (whether directly, or by holding any material
or equipment, or otherwise) any enclosure where live conductors
are likely to be present; and
(ii) the work is tested and certified in accordance with Part 2 of AS/
NZS 3000, before being connected to a power supply, by a person
authorised to inspect mains work.

 

------------------------------------------------

 

I've bolded the relevant clauses. If you start altering the wiring, it must be certified by an inspector, not an electrician,


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