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  # 2032428 9-Jun-2018 09:02
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vexxxboy:

anybody can wire up plugs and light fittings in a private house and people are worried about using an adapter


A good source of foreign quality female power plugs would be good.

When I was in Europe last year I bought a couple of female euro power sockets. I got a couple of computer cables and chopped the jug socket bit off and replaced that with the euro plugs. They fit much nicer than a crappy/wobbly adapter.
There are some shockingly bad quality adapter plugs out there.




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  # 2032429 9-Jun-2018 09:04
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Wiggum:

 

Rikkitic:

 

Since there are no children in my vicinity I don't tend to worry unduly about things like this but I have had some adapters from China that were so unfit for purpose even I wouldn't use them. Extremely flimsy, loose-fitting, exposed contacts, the whole ball of wax. Either I repair them to make them safely usable or I find something else.

 

 

I have seen similar types on trademe. Some without even an earth pin.

 

 

You don't always need an earth pin. 


 
 
 
 


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  # 2032438 9-Jun-2018 10:13

robjg63:

You cant cut the plug off a power brick I am afraid - and often with imported items its too difficult to source a replacement with a NZ plug. 



Solder a cable with an NZ plug onto the pins of the power brick. Double layer of heatshrink for insulation.





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  # 2032467 9-Jun-2018 12:13
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So many devices these days are either dual voltage capable with the usual figure-8 or 3 pin IEC lead, or USB ... it seems much less of a problem than the old days of some random diameter, random polarity or random ac or dc random voltage coaxial pin wall wart.


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  # 2032480 9-Jun-2018 12:50
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There have been so many issues with these travel adaptors, I would use one as a temporary measure only, they are prone to the contacts losing their spring tension on the pins and causing the adaptor to burn out.

 

 

 

Seen this happen to many of them, worst case is a fire, and it is much more common than you think!

 

 

 

If you have a travel adaptor and want a more permanent solution go and buy a power adaptor with NZ style pins, don't rely on a $2 adaptor for your families safety


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  # 2032525 9-Jun-2018 14:04
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gregmcc:

 

There have been so many issues with these travel adaptors, I would use one as a temporary measure only, they are prone to the contacts losing their spring tension on the pins and causing the adaptor to burn out.

 

 

 

Seen this happen to many of them, worst case is a fire, and it is much more common than you think!

 

 

 

If you have a travel adaptor and want a more permanent solution go and buy a power adaptor with NZ style pins, don't rely on a $2 adaptor for your families safety

 

 

This is sensible advice but it doesn't work for everything. Some AC adaptor power supplies I have seen are almost impossible to find local replacements for. They may have cables that don't plug in but are integrated into the adaptor unit. They may use micro-usb or other weird connectors that cannot be found on replacement units with the right voltage/current specifications. Sometimes an adaptor plug is almost the only solution that doesn't make you tear your hair out. Sometimes bending the pins may be the least awful solution, if done properly. Also, not all adaptor plugs are equal. The most important thing, other than exposed bits that can electrocute, is a really snug fit that won't loosen over time. Loose connections cause arcing and fires and all kinds of grief. If the plug or cable cannot easily be replaced, or a properly replacement adaptor cannot be sourced, there are ways to build up the pins or modify the socket to ensure a really good fit.

 

 





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  # 2032549 9-Jun-2018 14:33
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I got so sick of them being lose with that stupid European plug design that seems designed to be loose that I got a euro powerstrip off somewhere online and whacked a au plug onto it. Now all the adapters are supported somewhat by that ill fitting plastic tongue in the guide around it and I dont pick up the phone and have the whole charger come with it.

 

 





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  # 2033132 10-Jun-2018 16:07
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Next time I buy something from Amazon I'm going to also purchase a US multiboard in the cart. When it arrives here I can either hook that up to a travel adapter or fit a NZ plug to it.

 

That way my US sourced Fire TV, Chromecast etc will plug straight in to US sockets and my NZ multiboard won't be overrun with bulky travel adapters rendering every second socket unusable due to lack of space.

 

But, will a US multiboard handle 240 volts? I assume since the amperage will be low it'll be fine, but would like to hear from a someone who knows these things for sure.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 2033142 10-Jun-2018 16:45
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Kiwifruta:

 

Next time I buy something from Amazon I'm going to also purchase a US multiboard in the cart. When it arrives here I can either hook that up to a travel adapter or fit a NZ plug to it.

 

That way my US sourced Fire TV, Chromecast etc will plug straight in to US sockets and my NZ multiboard won't be overrun with bulky travel adapters rendering every second socket unusable due to lack of space.

 

But, will a US multiboard handle 240 volts? I assume since the amperage will be low it'll be fine, but would like to hear from a someone who knows these things for sure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Need to take care here, what is the peak insulation voltage the multiboard can handle? keeping in mind 230V is the RMS voltage we get, peak to peak is 325V that is typically the insulation voltage for wiring here is 400V

 

Also look at the multibox, will it include surge protection? if so typical voltage of the MOV's in them are 250VAC, well below the 325V Peak to Peak.

 

 

 

There are so many things to consider that most people don't even realise, so be very careful


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  # 2033667 11-Jun-2018 13:36
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surfisup1000:

You don't always need an earth pin. 

 

 

Exactly, the current is quite capable of finding a path to ground through your body.

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  # 2033668 11-Jun-2018 13:39
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neb:
surfisup1000:

 

You don't always need an earth pin. 

 

Exactly, the current is quite capable of finding a path to ground through your body.

 

This should really be the answer to the original question!

 

 


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  # 2033671 11-Jun-2018 13:42
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Wade: I tweaked my Chinese plug pins with pliers, fits NZ sockets no problem now. 😊

 

 

 

Hehe , I do the same tongue-out


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  # 2033673 11-Jun-2018 13:50
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neb:
surfisup1000:

 

You don't always need an earth pin. 

 

Exactly, the current is quite capable of finding a path to ground through your body.

 

The earth pin is only relevant to non double insulated devices, IOW where you could touch the conductive case which could potentially be live.

 

 


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  # 2033676 11-Jun-2018 13:55
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Most small devices likely to be fed by an external power brick or wall wart are probably completely sealed on plastic, with no exposed metal bits, but some may not be and that is where there could be a potential risk. In my experience, devices without earth pins do not have any exposed metal bits.

 

 





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  # 2033678 11-Jun-2018 13:59
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xcon:

 

Wade: I tweaked my Chinese plug pins with pliers, fits NZ sockets no problem now. 😊

 

 

 

Hehe , I do the same tongue-out

 

 

Many people do, me included. But it's important to be sure that twisting the pin is done slowly and carefully and doesn't crack or dislodge anything. A connection that starts arcing internally is definitely a major safety hazard.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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