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Topic # 247768 22-Feb-2019 09:27
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Hey Team,

 

Just a question - we have a series of people who require Panic / Distress buttons (kind of like the hospitals use) and report back to one central location.

 

We have a wi-fi connection to the units - so IoT device would be good.

 

 

 

I'm after any ideas on what such devices might be around?

 

Something like this (but not as fancy)

 

 

 

 

Thanks - Grunta


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  Reply # 2185213 22-Feb-2019 09:29
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I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.





 


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  Reply # 2185216 22-Feb-2019 09:34
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Would suggest either speaking to a security or nurse call company. Aotea Security do both, https://www.aoteaelectric.co.nz/nurse-call-1055855

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2185218 22-Feb-2019 09:35
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This stuff seems to be very niche still, I had a lot of trouble finding people who will set this stuff up (echo/light switches/aircon/ etc) and ended up organizing it my self...

 

Keeping with using commercial off the shelf hardware is always the goal so you easily replace components

 

"iot button" is what you want to google

 

 


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  Reply # 2185237 22-Feb-2019 09:53
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I would agree with coil. I would say something wired into a landline and that is not reliant on having electricity. 


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  Reply # 2185242 22-Feb-2019 09:57
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Coil:

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.



There's 1000s of medic alert bracelets and pendants already out there used by St Johns etc. You're too late.

gzt

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  Reply # 2185253 22-Feb-2019 10:14
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Bung:
Coil:

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.



There's 1000s of medic alert bracelets and pendants already out there used by St Johns etc. You're too late.

Professional solutions are unlikely to be using a typical wifi protocol like 802.x.x

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  Reply # 2185278 22-Feb-2019 10:34
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Bung:
Coil:

 

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.

 



There's 1000s of medic alert bracelets and pendants already out there used by St Johns etc. You're too late.

 

That's because they have a mobile part that is carried around, the base station is generally connected to a hard wired network..


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  Reply # 2185282 22-Feb-2019 10:41
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Bung:
Coil:

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.



There's 1000s of medic alert bracelets and pendants already out there used by St Johns etc. You're too late.


And they are used in peoples own homes. In other words people who are still capable of indenpendant living (or close to it). And those remotes probably use the same frequencies as car alarm remotes. So better range and less problems than using the Wifi bands.

Which is a different situation to a care facility of some sort. Where the residents will be more dependent. So any system needs to be more reliable.





neb

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  Reply # 2185320 22-Feb-2019 12:08
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Coil:

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.

 

 

+1, and I'd extend that to also include "or anything with the word IoT in it".

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  Reply # 2185325 22-Feb-2019 12:15
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gzt:
Bung:
Coil:

 

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.

 



There's 1000s of medic alert bracelets and pendants already out there used by St Johns etc. You're too late.

Professional solutions are unlikely to be using a typical wifi protocol like 802.x.x

 

That's because those "professional" solutions were designed before WiFi.

 

 


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  Reply # 2185342 22-Feb-2019 12:22
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I was responding to Coil's "any" form of wireless statement. Obviously any solution has to be suitable.

 

A company named Sensium make a monitoring patch for hospital patients. Normally this communicates via their own bridge but apparently if the existing wifi network is "robust and reliable" it can be used. https://www.sensium.co.uk/_assets/media/documents/FAQs.pdf

 

A few years ago I was hooked up to a portable monitor after a heart op at Wgtn. It took them a couple of days to tell me where I couldn't go. Presumably I was dropping off the system and reappearing. God knows what sort of system that was

 

 


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  Reply # 2185355 22-Feb-2019 12:41
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A wifi network could absolutely be engineered to provide enough reliability to run something like this. I would assume if the OP is asking the question, they are already aware of Nurse Call systems and simply don't require that level of solution - not too mention how stupidly expensive Nurse Call.


neb

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  Reply # 2185380 22-Feb-2019 13:36
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If you want a ready-made product there's this, but as has been pointed out it's both WiFi and IoT, so the last thing you'd want to use in a life-critical situation.

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  Reply # 2185492 22-Feb-2019 16:30
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neb: If you want a ready-made product there's this

 

That would not work for a distress call. Too fiddly.

 

There are some other Bluetooth/Wi-fi buttons out there made for smart home applications - but wouldn't suggest them since I wouldn't trust them.

 

 





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  Reply # 2185516 22-Feb-2019 17:14
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Coil:

 

I would not suggest using any form of wireless comms for a device that someones life relies on.

 


 

Car makers are talking about 5G and IoT...

 

Here is one link I can find...

 

https://5g.co.uk/guides/5g-and-the-connected-car/

 

 





Gordy


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