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67 posts

Master Geek


  # 2363657 30-Nov-2019 17:43
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We just built a new house and will be using smart lamps (Philips Hue). We put switches in the rooms but won't be using them they will be just left on with the smart lamps doing all the work...that way we can fall back to the switches if we. Need to.

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  # 2363859 1-Dec-2019 10:29
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DjShadow:

 

I remember when watching The Block NZ, one of the teams used this Resene product to hide the switches in a room, all you have to do is tap on a zone on the wall and it turns the lights on/off

 

https://www.resene.co.nz/comn/whtsnew/SmartTouch-conductive-coating.htm

 

Saw this as well. My partner and I talked about this but decided it would be quite frustrating plus you might end up with that particular area covered in grubby marks.

 

 

 

Talk about Secret Seven & Famous Five stuff - what every happen to 'pull the wall candle holder' or 'twist the coat hook' or 'turn the staircase finials' or 'poke the statue's eye' ?





iMac 27" (late 2013), Airport Time Capsule + Airport Express, iPhone7, iPad6, iPad Mini2

 

Panasonic Blu-ray PVR DMR-BWT835 + Panasonic Viera TH-L50E6Z, Chromecast Ultra, Yamaha AVR RX-V1085


 
 
 
 


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  # 2363868 1-Dec-2019 10:47
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Im not going for no switches, but what I will be doing is slashing the number of switches down to just one in most rooms, and putting all the other lighting as smartbulbs or controlled. The main general lighting is the one I need on when I walk in, decorative wall lights and stuff are fine by laggy voice control and can be automated to follow the main lights etc. Had 4 switches in the lounge and one was for a sensor light which is annoying when it gets turned off.

 

I might get some of those PDL switch modules with the hinged cover on the for the smart lights, or just not have a switch at all.





Richard rich.ms

206 posts

Master Geek


  # 2363872 1-Dec-2019 10:52
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Easier and cheaper to completely wire a house when building/renovating than trying to add extra switches later. Think of the next person who owns your home!!!


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  # 2364240 1-Dec-2019 21:27
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What about these guys?
https://www.futuresystems.co.nz/

1094 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2364362 2-Dec-2019 09:52
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I'm a bit late joining this discussion, but I've been giving serious thought to how I may do something similar.

 

I wish to avoid commercial products because it is almost certain they won't remain on the market for any decent period of time. While I can still buy an identical cupboard latch for my grandmother's 1970s home, we already have at least four different styles of power point in our late '80s home, and the window latches are impossible to replace.

 

I would avoid a central power switch location. It'll cost you in wiring and lacks the simple convenience of a switch in a room. Instead, what I would suggest is installing momentary contact switches in traditional locations to send low-voltage pulses to a small computer in each room (or area). A Raspberry Pi is suitable for this, and cheap, but it doesn't matter - the idea, at least for me, is for the technology to be easily switched as necessary.

 

Each computer would run simple software to control DIN-mounted relays via GPIO, which would then switch the lights on and off. No, you don't get fancy light controls, but if you need that, there is already a perfectly good standard for controlling that too - DMX.

 

Because everything is open, it's easy to integrate with automation systems should you wish to, and if you ever wanted to sell or were stuck for replacement parts, you could simply pull out the computer and replace it with a latching relay. Aside from the clicky switches, the lights would then function normally.


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Ultimate Geek

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  # 2364428 2-Dec-2019 11:04
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If you're dead set on this, I'd recommend getting flush boxes with exact measurements from permanent features of the building such as doorways, windows, etc. and installing the wiring as normal, and then covering them with plaster, that way you can retrofit light switches when/if you eventually go to sell/regain your sanity.

 

The biggest consideration for me would be how would you manage guests visiting the house? Everyone understands light switches.

 

Not everyone understands smart phones or voice commands.





Anything I say is the ramblings of an ill informed, opinionated so-and-so, and not representative of any of my past, present or future employers, and is also probably best disregarded.


 
 
 
 


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  # 2364553 2-Dec-2019 12:11
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

I'm a bit late joining this discussion, but I've been giving serious thought to how I may do something similar.

 

I wish to avoid commercial products because it is almost certain they won't remain on the market for any decent period of time. While I can still buy an identical cupboard latch for my grandmother's 1970s home, we already have at least four different styles of power point in our late '80s home, and the window latches are impossible to replace.

 

I would avoid a central power switch location. It'll cost you in wiring and lacks the simple convenience of a switch in a room. Instead, what I would suggest is installing momentary contact switches in traditional locations to send low-voltage pulses to a small computer in each room (or area). A Raspberry Pi is suitable for this, and cheap, but it doesn't matter - the idea, at least for me, is for the technology to be easily switched as necessary.

 

Each computer would run simple software to control DIN-mounted relays via GPIO, which would then switch the lights on and off. No, you don't get fancy light controls, but if you need that, there is already a perfectly good standard for controlling that too - DMX.

 

Because everything is open, it's easy to integrate with automation systems should you wish to, and if you ever wanted to sell or were stuck for replacement parts, you could simply pull out the computer and replace it with a latching relay. Aside from the clicky switches, the lights would then function normally.

 

 

You've seen how Jonathan Oxer has done his via mqtt?  (superhouse.tv)

 

 





Previously known as psycik

OpenHAB: Gigabyte AMD A8 BrixOpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller, Raspberry PI, Wemos D1 Mini, Zwave, Xiaomi Humidity and Temperature sensors and Bluetooth LE Sensors
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 10
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


1094 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2364559 2-Dec-2019 12:18
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davidcole:

 

You've seen how Jonathan Oxer has done his via mqtt?  (superhouse.tv)

 

 

I haven't seen that, but I will check it out.

 

I intend to use MQTT and have almost finished writing my own library for the purpose. My MQTT 3.11 implementation was more or less complete, but I've still got a bit of work to fully support MQTT 5. I don't have the house (or land) yet, so no rush :)

 

 


308 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2364593 2-Dec-2019 13:35
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As others have said install physical switches.  You may not be able to turn main room lights on or off if your modem is spiked and none of your devices can talk to the central control unit.


800 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2364602 2-Dec-2019 13:50
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I like the idea of IR sensors in each room. Our work offices build 5 years ago have something like this and they are great  - turn on as you enter and despite that I remain seated at my desk for 2+ hours, they don't turn the lights off while I am working.
But if I leave lights are off 10 min later.

 

Saying that our offices has a wall switch as well. Spring loaded (or something) so always flicks back to top down, but toggles the light when you activate it.

 

Then I'd add some wifi bulbs so you can connect a phone or google home etc as needed.

 

This would give you all 3 options - IR sensor, switch and voice/smart device.


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  # 2364603 2-Dec-2019 13:52
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

davidcole:

 

You've seen how Jonathan Oxer has done his via mqtt?  (superhouse.tv)

 

 

I haven't seen that, but I will check it out.

 

I intend to use MQTT and have almost finished writing my own library for the purpose. My MQTT 3.11 implementation was more or less complete, but I've still got a bit of work to fully support MQTT 5. I don't have the house (or land) yet, so no rush :)

 

 





Previously known as psycik

OpenHAB: Gigabyte AMD A8 BrixOpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller, Raspberry PI, Wemos D1 Mini, Zwave, Xiaomi Humidity and Temperature sensors and Bluetooth LE Sensors
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 10
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


1094 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2364700 2-Dec-2019 14:18
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KrazyKid:

 

I like the idea of IR sensors in each room.

 

 

PDL make IR sensors that fit in their 600 Series plates. Unfortunately, they are AC. A DC version that could be connected directly to I/O ports would be ideal for detecting and switch based on user presence (also a bit tidier than typical IR sensors for alarms).

 

 

 

davidcole:

 

 

Video doesn't appear to be working.


Hmm, what to write...
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  # 2364752 2-Dec-2019 14:36
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I have a smart house, I can use an iphone or what ever to control anything I want. I have schedules, lots of cool logic and switchboard that looks like something from Star trek ."The Bridge" as my wife calls it.

 

Using iphones etc becomes old very quickly. I have wall switches in every room in exactly the place you would expect them. Yes most are LCD $500 things but they are still physical switches. even then my guests have difficultly turning on a light or lowering the blinds .... my advice, put in physical switches. If you don't then at least run cable and put in flush boxes





Matthew


512 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2365237 2-Dec-2019 22:43
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As an electrician I often find people want to rip out automation systems altogether and go back to a standard switch. I wouldn't ever not have light switches in normal places - you can get Z wave devices now that will work with standard wiring to accomodate smart wiring wishes. In the last year I've pulled out some very expensive automation because it drives the owners batsh*t crazy. It doesn't always work as intended. It rarely survives without glitching.


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