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# 262050 2-Jan-2020 10:39
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So this just popped up on my ads. Just curious really, but with consumer electrical equipment we have certification, marks etc but what about circuit breakers? 

 

Click to see full size

 

So for example;

 

The Electricity Act 1992 requires all electrical products to be of a high quality and standard, so that their construction and maintenance meet the safety requirements within the Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010.

 

Is a circuit breaker considered an electrical product?


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  # 2384082 2-Jan-2020 10:43
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  # 2384106 2-Jan-2020 11:42
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Are you talking about the European Conformit (CE) marking? Because there is plenty of stuff out there with fake CE marks on it. 


 
 
 
 


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  # 2384148 2-Jan-2020 13:05
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The CE marks are only as fake as the poorly photoshopped testing certificates they will email you on request are ;)





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  # 2384155 2-Jan-2020 13:23
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A circuit breaker is a circuit protection device. It would seem this product is primarily being promoted as a switching device, something a circuit breaker isn't intended to be.

 

I cannot see why anyone would want/need a WiFi circuit breaker. A WiFi switch, Yes but a WiFi circuit breaker, No.





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  # 2384226 2-Jan-2020 15:00
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I think its more for resetting it when it trips from overcurrent.

 

A friend tried to find a self resetting breaker for their airbnb because it only has a 32 amp supply and people kept tripping it and leaving bad reviews because the power was unreliable - this is in aussie. Couldnt find anything on the market and he was looking at something similar to this but the sparky said no.





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  # 2384254 2-Jan-2020 15:46
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lxsw20:

Are you talking about the European Conformit (CE) marking? Because there is plenty of stuff out there with fake CE marks on it. 

 

 

Ah, and there's your mistake, CE on a lot of Chinese-made electrical gear stands for Chinese Electronics or Consumer Electronics or China Export or something similar. Your fault as a consumer for confusing the CE logo meaning "conformant with EU electrical legislation" with the identical CE logo meaning "Chinese Electronics" or whatever.

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  # 2384257 2-Jan-2020 15:53
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neb:
lxsw20:

 

Are you talking about the European Conformit (CE) marking? Because there is plenty of stuff out there with fake CE marks on it. 

 

Ah, and there's your mistake, CE on a lot of Chinese-made electrical gear stands for Chinese Electronics or Consumer Electronics or China Export or something similar. Your fault as a consumer for confusing the CE logo meaning "conformant with EU electrical legislation" with the identical CE logo meaning "Chinese Electronics" or whatever.

 

😂😂😂


 
 
 
 


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  # 2384258 2-Jan-2020 15:57
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WiFi-controlled "CE" MCBs, from the same manufacturers that bring you this. It's only a 1.6W laser, what could possibly go wrong?

 

 

"You can see the laser engraving machine printing directly with glasses". Well, once, very briefly, anyway.

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  # 2384288 2-Jan-2020 17:33
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tchart:

 

So this just popped up on my ads. Just curious really, but with consumer electrical equipment we have certification, marks etc but what about circuit breakers? 

 

Click to see full size

 

So for example;

 

The Electricity Act 1992 requires all electrical products to be of a high quality and standard, so that their construction and maintenance meet the safety requirements within the Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010.

 

Is a circuit breaker considered an electrical product?

 

 

You should be very careful here for 3 reasons.

 

1) It doesn't look like there is any function to stop repeated Wifi resetting, this would appear to be in violation of AS/NZS3000:2007 2.4.4 (b)

 

2) As a homeowner you are not permitted to do work in a switchboard, the only place this would practically be is in a switchboard.

 

3)  Circuit breakers for use in NZ required a SDOC from the manufacturer and are a declared medium/high risk article - I would highly doubt that this has been tested by an accredited lab that says it is safe to use in NZ.

 

 


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  # 2384375 2-Jan-2020 21:05
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If you did go ahead and install one of these and it does not have a valid SDOC what is your insurance company going to say if your house burnt down because it failed to trip.

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  # 2384377 2-Jan-2020 21:11
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Seems a rather pointless product to me. If a MCB trips it's in all likelihood because there is fault with either something in the circuit or something plugged into an outlet in the circuit. Why would you want to use an app to simply reset a MCB? You should at least be visually checking everything plugged in anyway as a basic step.

 

 

 

 


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  # 2384388 2-Jan-2020 21:28
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richms:

 

I think its more for resetting it when it trips from overcurrent.

 

A friend tried to find a self resetting breaker for their airbnb because it only has a 32 amp supply and people kept tripping it and leaving bad reviews because the power was unreliable - this is in aussie. Couldnt find anything on the market and he was looking at something similar to this but the sparky said no.

 

Wow..... that's a big no from me!  A circuit breaker breaks the curcuit because something is wrong that needs attention.  Manual attention by someone with decent electrical knowledge.  Prevention steps put in place.





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  # 2384401 2-Jan-2020 22:09
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larknz: If you did go ahead and install one of these and it does not have a valid SDOC what is your insurance company going to say if your house burnt down because it failed to trip.

 

If you did go ahead and install one of these yourself and/or it does not have a valid SDOC and your house burnt down for any reason that looks even vaguely 'electrical', your insurance company will almost certainly just shrug and walk away.
Insurance companies are like that.

 

There's bound to be a clause somewhere in the dozens of pages of small print in the policy document that gets them out of a claim if there has been unauthorised electrical work (such as a homeowner touching the switchboard) or unapproved (i.e. no SDOC) electrical safety equipment has been installed.


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  # 2384462 2-Jan-2020 23:53
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PolicyGuy:

 

larknz: If you did go ahead and install one of these and it does not have a valid SDOC what is your insurance company going to say if your house burnt down because it failed to trip.

 

If you did go ahead and install one of these yourself and/or it does not have a valid SDOC and your house burnt down for any reason that looks even vaguely 'electrical', your insurance company will almost certainly just shrug and walk away.
Insurance companies are like that.

 

There's bound to be a clause somewhere in the dozens of pages of small print in the policy document that gets them out of a claim if there has been unauthorised electrical work (such as a homeowner touching the switchboard) or unapproved (i.e. no SDOC) electrical safety equipment has been installed.

 

 

 

 

I was actually looking at my IAG policy (BNZ) a while back and there wasn't anything about this.





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  # 2384463 2-Jan-2020 23:54
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richms:

 

I think its more for resetting it when it trips from overcurrent.

 

A friend tried to find a self resetting breaker for their airbnb because it only has a 32 amp supply and people kept tripping it and leaving bad reviews because the power was unreliable - this is in aussie. Couldnt find anything on the market and he was looking at something similar to this but the sparky said no.

 

 

 

 

Can he just reduce the current draw i.e. getting low current oven, disabling a couple of the cooking plates etc.?





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