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2527 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1682712 5-Dec-2016 17:11
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MIS:

 

If it is possible kindly let me know is Christmas proper time to go to Auckland to find a IT Supporter job?

 

Some people say one month after Christmas is good time, Some other say Christmas is ok.

 

 

Nope, everybody is on holiday mode or getting ready for it.





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1682765 5-Dec-2016 17:45
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MIS:

 

If it is possible kindly let me know is Christmas proper time to go to Auckland to find a IT Supporter job?

 

Some people say one month after Christmas is good time, Some other say Christmas is ok.

 

 

 

 

February / March / April IMO, That's when companies are back in full swing and generally will know if they have the budget for new staff.

 

 


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1682795 5-Dec-2016 18:49
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+1 Don't even bother until February

 

 





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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1683188 6-Dec-2016 10:57
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First, I'd suggest you focus on learning the basics. Because if you know how an operating system works, it will make easier to fix issues. I'm talking about File System, protocols/services (DNS, FTP, HTTP...), etc. Learning about computer networks is important too. Mastering the basic stuff will help you to choose the path you want to. It could be the MS Windows, Linux, or networking (eg.: Cisco technologies).

 

After working in the IT sector for over 15 years as a support technician/analyst (more a Linux, command line person), I can assure you the learning never ends. Also, the companies will ask for previous experience. You could try to help a local community centre, for example, with their IT needs, or setting up a local network, then put that on your CV.

 

Now I'm running my own business as a front end developer/website designer and knowing how the things work still saves me a lot of time. For example, when a client complained about his site that was offline for a few days. Using my knowledge about domain names (DNS), network troubleshooting (ping, telnet), I found the issue in two minutes. I knew everything was fine on my side. The client forgot to pay for his domain name annual fee lol. I'm sharing this to illustrate my point. 

 

Enjoy yourself while learning and developing your skills. Cheers


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