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  Reply # 57580 11-Jan-2007 13:29
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patdude123: Wired is running a poll (http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2007/01/poll_apple_ipho.html) on whether Apples going with Cingular is a deal breaker - so far 55% of all respondents say yes.


Or if you take the cup half-full approach, 45% of people who are not with Cingular are prepared to change carrier in order to get the iPhone. I think that is pretty good! Seems to me this poll is aimed at users who are NOT currently with Cingular.



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  Reply # 57608 11-Jan-2007 14:56
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Thats a fair co timmy the iPhone cup could be half full - even if its battery is non replaceable - so will you guys at Voda launch it?

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  Reply # 57611 11-Jan-2007 15:07
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Hey, we only heard about this yesterday too ;-)

Honestly it is far too early for that - but as a GSM device then you should be able to put a Voda NZ SIM card in and it should work fine, unless somehow locked to Cingular or other specific operators.




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  Reply # 57615 11-Jan-2007 15:17
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I think Apple caught everyone (but Cingular) on the hop with the iPhone! What about the wierd non-standard messaging architecture of the phone? Evidentially Cingular have had to put quite a bit of Apple stuff in their back-end to support the iphone...

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Master Geek

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  Reply # 57630 11-Jan-2007 15:52
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I was surprised at how long they had been working together - the Cingular CEO said 'when I first met Steve over 2 years ago'. 

For the visual voice mail I presume there is some sort of signalling message (or SMS) sent from the Cingular Voice mail platform to the iPhone that lists the phone number of the caller - the iPhone then compares that against the address book. So the development was probably done by Cingular's voice mail provider.

Actually I thought it showed the difference between IT and Telco cultures in an interesting way when you compare the relaxed presentation styles of Jobs, Schmidt (Google) and Yang (Yahoo) as against the Cingular guy who spoke in a very wooden way and mostly read off his queue card.

Of course I am not saying that all Telco people are wooden.



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Reply # 57635 11-Jan-2007 16:13
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I agree - I'm sure some telco people are made from silly putty (myself included!) I met Stevie J and the Cingular CEO a few years back at Macworld NY - I think the relationship between the two came out of Tiger's integrated bluetooth capability (Sony Ericsson were also in pretty tight with Apple from memory too)....

Ah well at the very least the iPhone may finally spur some real competition and innovation - these tuppaware clamshell and candybar phones are all similar to the point of being boring

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  Reply # 57645 11-Jan-2007 17:04
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timmyh:
For the visual voice mail I presume there is some sort of signalling message (or SMS) sent from the Cingular Voice mail platform to the iPhone that lists the phone number of the caller - the iPhone then compares that against the address book. So the development was probably done by Cingular's voice mail provider.


Has anybody seen anything in depth about the the visual VM? From what I read it simply shows a list of people (with picture) who have left you a VM message in your mailbox. Part of the GSM spec not used by most GSM operators is a VM notification icon which is still supported by every GSM phone out there. The VM platform sends this as an SMS which turns the icon on and off on the screen of your phone so you know if you have a VM waiting. I read somewhere years ago that the spec also included sending extra data as part of the SMS so all Apple have probably done is written software to take advantage of this. Cingular send a VM notification with the number of the caller for every message left and the phone handles the rest. Quite simple stuff really.




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Reply # 57654 11-Jan-2007 19:24
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I had heard that the iPhone implementation required some back-end work on Cingulars part and that the iPhone didn't comply with any specific standards for VM, but hey who knows, its early days right?

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  Reply # 57763 13-Jan-2007 09:18
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freitasm: And just to add to the discussion, the iPhone is a feature phone, not a smartphone. According to Steve Jobs, the iPhone will not allow third party applications to be installed.


The tags for the article are amusing:

lame, apple, haha, iphone, stupid




 



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Master Geek


  Reply # 57788 13-Jan-2007 18:17
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Its interesting just what a big reaction the iPhone got. It is a sexy looking bit of kit, but once you start taking a closer look it stops being all that attractive. I think about the best thing with the iPhone's launch is the fact that it'll generate some serious innovation and hopefully a reasonable amount of competition...here's hoping we see Microsoft, Nokia, Sony Ericsson, Sanyo and the assorted other manufacturers bringing some equally tasty mobile goodies to market

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  Reply # 57983 15-Jan-2007 20:39
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I think a lot of people are overlooking what is actually different about this phone.

It's not about having the latest and greatest features. It's about providing a system and interface which provides the mass market of everyday cell phone users with the ability to access the features, which, for the most part, have been hidden behind amazingly poor gui's. 

Only geeks have the time to piss around finding out how to use many of the features of smart phones. I think the thing which is going to be revolutionary about this, is nothing to do with hardware, it the interface. Providing normal users with the ability to use functions that they would have never known how to use previously without resorting to reading a manual.

Also, the fact that Apple is not only push for change in the handset end, but also at the network infrustructure level, comments are that visual voicemail is just the first of such network level changes.

And from an engineering standpoint, the device is remarkable, there must be some reasonably serious custom silicon to driving some functions to get the battery life they report out of an 11mm thick device.

Also, Apple have not said that they will not allow 3rd party applications to be installed. They have said that they are going to regulate it, to control the quality of the software going onto the phone, (probably also a contractual arrangement with Cingular to prevent unwanted services like VoIP applications too)

I think this is a giant leap foward in terms of providing normal cell phone users easy access to the functions available without resorting to reading manuals.





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Reply # 58008 16-Jan-2007 07:41
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I'll beg to differ - it's an overhyped piece of junk with a non user replaceable battery and GPRS data which renders most of its functions next to useless

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