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BDFL - Memuneh
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Reply # 77166 6-Jul-2007 16:44
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BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 77208 7-Jul-2007 07:37
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Access to a serial console is now available:




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  Reply # 77726 11-Jul-2007 12:35
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Looks like the single most critical question about the iPhone has been answered. Will it blend?


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  Reply # 78361 16-Jul-2007 22:01
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Yikes that took awhile to load, is that my slow DSL or a big list?

Cyril

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Reply # 79178 22-Jul-2007 10:50
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What a poorly written review on New Zealand Herald, and they forget to mention the essentials:

From my blog:


Let's see: a company is importing those devices into the country, and even though people are buying an iPod with phone, they can't connect it directly to the local GSM (for now) operator Vodafone New Zealand. Why? Because it's locked to AT&T's network in the U.S.

So the options are:

a) buy an iPhone and use it as an iPod only and browse the Internet through Wi-Fi (which is not available everywhere you know) therefore having an iPhone without the phone, or

b) buy an iPhone and use it as an iPhone but with an AT&T number, paying to roaming fees to place and receive phone calls, paying four times the normal SMS prices and forcing your friends to place long distance international calls to reach you on an American number (did I mention you'd be paying to receive those calls as well?)

Now, what the article (and the importer) fails to mentions is that AT&T policy is that if the network detects more than four months of usage outside their "home" location, the cellular connection is cut:


An obliging customer service agent explained that if AT&T's computer sees four months of chitchatting in Alaska (or elsewhere out of AT&T coverage area), service will be automatically canceled.

But if you call AT&T ahead of time and explain to them that you'll be on an extended trip, you can avoid service termination -- at least for a little while.

In a second phone call, Siegel testily confirmed the four-month figure.


The importer also conrfuses EDGE with GPRS: "Surfing via wireless broadband network is fast; web access via EDGE on Vodafone is much slower" but fail to let users know that there's no Vodafone EDGE network in New Zealand, it's all GPRS - and patchy performance as we know. Of course the New Zealand Herald doesn't mention this in the article either.

In the meantime, kiwis could look for the cheap Chinese knock off on Trade Me, the tPhone.







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  Reply # 79190 22-Jul-2007 12:16
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Doesn't it irritate you when you see reporters commenting on things they clearly have done little to no research on, and don't understand.

Who's willing to pay $1000 for a (surprisingly poor) Chinese ripoff? With the dollar where it is, a real iPhone is less expensive.

There has been a breakthough in the hacking attempt in the last few days.

The team have got a basic toolchain working (interestingly it uses llmv-gcc) and have compiled and successfully run a "Hello World" application.

The last component is breaking the SIM lock (the really hard part). They know how to send the unlock code to the cellular baseband, but they suspect after 3-10 attempts at entering a unlock code, the phone will be hard locked to at&t. So they need to be able to generate a valid network control key.

So close, yet so far...

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  Reply # 79192 22-Jul-2007 12:22
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lduncan:

Who's willing to pay $1000 for a (surprisingly poor) Chinese ripoff? With the dollar where it is, a real iPhone is less expensive.


That guy is making a killing. The phones are only worth about NZ$400 to buy in Asia at present. I've also read a few reports online from people saying that they work surprisingly well.. It's amazing how fast the chinese can reverse engineer something!


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Reply # 79194 22-Jul-2007 12:26
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lduncan: Doesn't it irritate you when you see reporters commenting on things they clearly have done little to no research on, and don't understand.

Who's willing to pay $1000 for a (surprisingly poor) Chinese ripoff? With the dollar where it is, a real iPhone is less expensive.

There has been a breakthough in the hacking attempt in the last few days.

The team have got a basic toolchain working (interestingly it uses llmv-gcc) and have compiled and successfully run a "Hello World" application.

The last component is breaking the SIM lock (the really hard part). They know how to send the unlock code to the cellular baseband, but they suspect after 3-10 attempts at entering a unlock code, the phone will be hard locked to at&t. So they need to be able to generate a valid network control key.

So close, yet so far...


I think you have to read the blog and the NZ Herald article again. The tPhone (jokingly) suggestion was mine, not the reporter's. The tPhone  actually works in New Zealand, with a Vodafone SIM, while the iPhone doesn't. So it's in fact a better iPhone than the Apple's one.

Obviously they don't understand the difference between GPRS and EDGE, and ignore the fact that you have to buy the iPHone here, then activate with AT&T - which requires a SSN, which most New Zealanders won't have. So it's actually just a glorified iPod with a browsing and e-mail application. Much better to just get a Nokia N800 tablet for example.

As for hacking it, what prevents Apple releasing an OS update that locks your iPhone again next time you plug to iTunes to download some music?

People don't realise the business model is "closed". Very closed.





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  Reply # 79195 22-Jul-2007 12:27
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reverse engineered? more often than not it's just blatantly stolen.

Based on the specs, the tPhone doesn't look to be a reverse engineered iPhone. Looks more like a phone repackaged to look cosmetically like an iPhone.

The specs are vastly different.

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  Reply # 79221 22-Jul-2007 17:32
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 It looks worse than I thought it would.

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