Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
790 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2034299 12-Jun-2018 12:14
4 people support this post
Send private message

tripp:

 

I kind of agree with apple on this.  If he wanted his wife etc to have access then he would have given her the password.  What happens if there is something on that device that he never wanted her to ever see.  Now that he has gone he can not explain anything that might be on that device.

 

 

 

I'm in the same boat. As far as I'm concerned my phone and it's data is mine. If I want someone else to have access, then I'll give it to them. I have numerous back ups online, but they're still mine. I say this to people I know when I suggest a full reset of a device and they reply, oh I can't, I have stuff on there. What if you drop it in the loo, or lose it? All that data is gone. 

 

I worked for a bank awhile back and it was similar, we'd have couples come in, and mainly with older couples, only the male was the account holder. The wife would come in to do something and you'd have to explain, this is not your account, we can't do anything. It's just one of those things people don't like to discuss, but it makes it extremely awkward should something happen to the account holder. 


302 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  # 2034385 12-Jun-2018 13:11
2 people support this post
Send private message

I didn't see the show, but if she's got his laptop then it's over in 5 minutes.

 

iforgot.apple.com will get a new iCloud password happening, delivered to his email. Use that to access the photos on iCloud.com. The phone is still going to have a screen lock on it, so she'll have to DFU reset that & reinstall iOS via iTunes but when the activation page comes up, she's got his new iCloud password to enter. The phone will then restore from iCloud backup.





Megabyte - so geek it megahertz


 
 
 
 


3170 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 2034391 12-Jun-2018 13:31
Send private message

Feel for them but with the iPhone in that Disabled state, there's no way to get back into it without doing a restore via iTunes, even if you have the 'master password'.

 

I've also spoken to data recovery experts about it in the past and they've confirmed that there is also no way to recover the data off the device in that state.

 

The only way they're going to get anything would be via a backup, which hopefully the husband was doing to iTunes or iCloud.

 

 

 

 


302 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  # 2034392 12-Jun-2018 13:35
2 people support this post
Send private message

I've emailed Fair Go. I'll do what I can to get the best result for them.





Megabyte - so geek it megahertz


4370 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2034394 12-Jun-2018 13:39
2 people support this post
Send private message

dejadeadnz:

 

Rikitic: I haven't watched the video but your comment strikes me as extremely ignorant and one-sided. There's a reason why Apple (and I am hardly fond of their lack of CSR generally) would request an order proving probate: it serves as an order from the court that a person's last will has been "proved" and that there are valid executors of a will to execute the testator's intentions. Just because a man who happens to be married is dead, it doesn't automatically mean that legally his wife gets to do as she pleases with his property.

 

This sounds like a silly beat up to me.

 

 

I've found fairgo to be on the wrong side of a number of arguments in the last 2 or 3 years. 

 

Perhaps the issue should be the cost of the probate, I've no idea of the amount though. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


4370 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2034398 12-Jun-2018 13:44
Send private message

tripp:

 

I kind of agree with apple on this.  If he wanted his wife etc to have access then he would have given her the password.  What happens if there is something on that device that he never wanted her to ever see.  Now that he has gone he can not explain anything that might be on that device.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't think you can conclude that the husband didn't want the wife to have access. 

 

The husband just may not have expected to die or become incapacitated, or, he didn't know apples policies, or, he just didn't think about it.   Any of these could be possible.    

 

 

 

 


145 posts

Master Geek


  # 2034411 12-Jun-2018 13:47
3 people support this post
Send private message

I have recorded all of my online passwords in a secure application.

 

My wife has access to this information, should the worst happen, she has access to every account I have set up.

 

If I didn't trust my wife, I wouldn't have done this.

 

Seems like the entire thing isn't Apples fault, but the guy that died in the first place.

 

If you're going to have online and secure devices, make sure others that may want the data on your device after you pass away, let them have access to it.

 

It's a no brainer really.

 

 


 
 
 
 


5778 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2034412 12-Jun-2018 13:48
One person supports this post
Send private message

surfisup1000:

 

I don't think you can conclude that the husband didn't want the wife to have access. 

 

 

I think the point is you can't conclude whether he did or didn't, which is why Apple's policies are valid, and why the law exists in the first place.


14256 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 2034413 12-Jun-2018 13:52
Send private message

surfisup1000:

 

tripp:

 

I kind of agree with apple on this.  If he wanted his wife etc to have access then he would have given her the password.  What happens if there is something on that device that he never wanted her to ever see.  Now that he has gone he can not explain anything that might be on that device.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't think you can conclude that the husband didn't want the wife to have access. 

 

The husband just may not have expected to die or become incapacitated, or, he didn't know apples policies, or, he just didn't think about it.   Any of these could be possible.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

You maybe right, given that he/they were fighting cancer and dealing with all the medications, stress and emotions it is not inconceivable that the Apple password was low down on the list of priorities or even thought of.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

There is no planet B

 

 


4370 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2034415 12-Jun-2018 13:54
Send private message

gehenna:

 

surfisup1000:

 

I don't think you can conclude that the husband didn't want the wife to have access. 

 

 

I think the point is you can't conclude whether he did or didn't, which is why Apple's policies are valid, and why the law exists in the first place.

 

 

True, I also agree with apples stance. 




Lock him up!
10707 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 2034416 12-Jun-2018 13:56
One person supports this post
Send private message

NZSpides:

 

It's a no brainer really.

 

 

Maybe to you. Not necessarily to a non-technical person dying of cancer. Not everyone thinks of these things. Maybe there should be better procedures for dealing with these kinds of exceptional situations. Why victimise the poor woman because her husband didn't dot all his i's in time? These things happen. That is what people are like. 

 

 

 

 





I don't think there is ever a bad time to talk about how absurd war is, how old men make decisions and young people die. - George Clooney
 


324 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2034422 12-Jun-2018 14:04
Send private message

I thought about this scenario a few weeks ago

 

Both my husband and I use Google Photos as a free backup to our iPhone photos, as well as the icloud service.

 

Under Google photos my library is shared with him, sure he could look through it now if he wanted to but in the morbid event of my death and possible iPhone demise hopefully the kids are left with the memories.


664 posts

Ultimate Geek

Subscriber

  # 2034425 12-Jun-2018 14:11
2 people support this post
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

Maybe to you. Not necessarily to a non-technical person dying of cancer. Not everyone thinks of these things. Maybe there should be better procedures for dealing with these kinds of exceptional situations. Why victimise the poor woman because her husband didn't dot all his i's in time? These things happen. That is what people are like. 

 

 

Any procedures that they create/simplify will just weaken the security for everyone though. What if someone faked a death certificate for me (or a probate letter) and sent it to Apple HQ and got access to my iCloud Photo Library? Or my iCloud Keychain (which has every password of mine)?

 

Or if they gave the "power to unlock" to their phone support team, it would only take one disgruntled (or easily persuaded) CSR to say "Ok I'm sick of arguing, here's his/her password".


15172 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2034455 12-Jun-2018 14:39
Send private message

IANAL. This is possibly something that the government needs to look at this sort of with data protection and data privacy  laws, as the data is stored and controlled by a private company. When a bank gives you an eftpos card, and you put a pin on it, you are told not to share that pin with anyone otherwise it could mean that you will not be covered for losses should anyone access your account. That includes your spouse. That mentality means that people also don't tend to share passwords either. ALthough I don't watch fair go these days, the issue I see is the ownership of the photos / data, and probate would show that that noone else  owns them, or is claiming to own them, so I can see Apples point of view here.  But it is quite a high cost to pay. Do companies like facebook require people to provide a probate document before they will close or deactivate  a personal facebook account, or give someone else access to it? 


15172 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2034461 12-Jun-2018 14:41
Send private message

Benjip:

 

Rikkitic:

 

Maybe to you. Not necessarily to a non-technical person dying of cancer. Not everyone thinks of these things. Maybe there should be better procedures for dealing with these kinds of exceptional situations. Why victimise the poor woman because her husband didn't dot all his i's in time? These things happen. That is what people are like. 

 

 

Any procedures that they create/simplify will just weaken the security for everyone though. What if someone faked a death certificate for me (or a probate letter) and sent it to Apple HQ and got access to my iCloud Photo Library? Or my iCloud Keychain (which has every password of mine)?

 

Or if they gave the "power to unlock" to their phone support team, it would only take one disgruntled (or easily persuaded) CSR to say "Ok I'm sick of arguing, here's his/her password".

 

 

 

 

This is why private companies should be using systems like NZs Real Me to authenticate people. I remember how difficult it was to get a phoneline turned off for someone who died. 


1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Arlo unveils its first video doorbell
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:27


New Zealand students shortlisted for James Dyson Award
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:18


Norton LifeLock Launches Norton 360
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:11


Microsoft New Zealand Partner Awards results
Posted 18-Oct-2019 10:18


Logitech introduces new Made for Google keyboard and mouse devices
Posted 16-Oct-2019 13:36


MATTR launches to accelerate decentralised identity
Posted 16-Oct-2019 10:28


Vodafone X-Squad powers up for customers
Posted 16-Oct-2019 08:15


D Link ANZ launches EXO Smart Mesh Wi Fi Routers with McAfee protection
Posted 15-Oct-2019 11:31


Major Japanese retailer partners with smart New Zealand technology IMAGR
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:29


Ola pioneers one-time passcode feature to fight rideshare fraud
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:24


Spark Sport new home of NZC matches from 2020
Posted 10-Oct-2019 09:59


Meet Nola, Noel Leeming's new digital employee
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:07


Registrations for Sprout Accelerator open for 2020 season
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:02


Teletrac Navman welcomes AI tech leader Jens Meggers as new President
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:41


Vodafone makes voice of 4G (VoLTE) official
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:36



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.