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544 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 201901 8-Sep-2016 23:06
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A company I work with has a surplus of 100V (Japanese) automatic voltage regulators they're willing to consider offers on.

 

About 20-30x units currently on hand but up to about 100x available; some with usage varying 1-12mth others brand new.

 

Input: 170-260VAC 50/60Hz

 

Output: 100VAC 50/60Hz

 

Rating: 1kVA up to 2hr, 750VA continuous @ 230VAC

 

These are great units however have no NZ approvals (being auto-wound non-isolating hence removed from our import product) and would require a mains inputs to be wired.

 

Great for laboratory use, certain specialised applications or export.

 

PM me offers on ones or bulk.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.swallow.co.jp/products6.php

 

 

 

 


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1626143 9-Sep-2016 01:14
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Can you please double check they are non isolating.

 

I have found some on trademe that promise to be isolating and are not, and others that dont say isolating as a feature, but definitley are isolating.

 

Might be keen on a few if they are indeed isolating.

 

 





Ray Taylor
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www.ruralkiwi.com

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544 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1626356 9-Sep-2016 09:53
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Definitely non-isolating, input and output neutrals are common; see schematic with air-core transformer - essentially an automatic electromechanically driven variac.

 

Very cool and probably useful for some of your applications (high frequency / RF), as long as you have appropriate over-voltage protection on the output side as a fault condition could see it lit up to mains input voltage.

 

 

 

 


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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 1657083 24-Oct-2016 20:08
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PM'd


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  Reply # 1657491 25-Oct-2016 14:23
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solutionz:

 

A company I work with has a surplus of 100V (Japanese) automatic voltage regulators they're willing to consider offers on.

 

 

Out of curiosity I can accept one for free to tear it apart to see how claimed "automation" works.

 

I have isolated and non-isolated 1 - 3 kW transformers - so that one is not something I need. What attracted my curiosity here is the "variable" input range with fixed output 100V and the words "automatic regulator". Attached schematics suggets no "smarts" inside.

 

 




544 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1662112 1-Nov-2016 16:08
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"Smarts":

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

Click to see full size


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  Reply # 1662504 2-Nov-2016 10:24
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solutionz:

 

"Smarts":

 

Click to see full size

 

 

That is very cool! Thanks for the effort of making those photos! I can see what they've done here with the control board and mechanical sliding contact (visible on the 1st photo) making the output votage as claimed. Motor is made in Japan - would expect the control board as well. Soldering and PCB look accurate. Good example of Japanese engineering. 

 

It is pity you did not get loacl certification for that - would be in demand for those families who brought their preferred appliances from Japan to NZ!


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