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  Reply # 839561 19-Jun-2013 15:59
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just turned on mine and I could access both netflix and hulu on my pc. netflix on apple tv2 works as well... BUT unfortunately HULU is not working on apple tv... anyone can test this on their apple tv as well? will use unblock for now..



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  Reply # 839581 19-Jun-2013 16:17
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NZCoderGuy:
insane: No, was actually pulled by the old owners before the ISP was sold, had nothing to do with the new/current owners at all.


I'm un-sure as to the situation now - does anyone have any evidence of either or?


Perhaps they made a condition to buy the provider that the service wasn't there. In any case, do not continue here. If you really want to discuss, please create a new thread instead of going off topic.





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  Reply # 839636 19-Jun-2013 17:14
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nickb800:
Aaroona: So what services exactly does this open us up to? The text itself is vague, either that, or I am being dense. 

Are we talking about things like Hulu for example? 


If they never promise specific services, then they can't be blamed when Hulu (for instance) blocks them


why would hulu, or netflix block if they werent forced to?  who will tell them what ip addresses to block?  as far as they are concerned, they are limiting their service to geographic ip's as per what their contracts would state.  if some other company extends the US based geoocated ip address elsewhere, then its somewhat out of their control.  netflix, at least, would be making more money if there are ways to access it outside their geo regions.  they probably wouldnt shut it down by choice :)




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Geek
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  Reply # 839664 19-Jun-2013 17:48
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anyone get the same warning like me? i am on BB250 Innocent


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  Reply # 839680 19-Jun-2013 18:11
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alright, that's because SS detected i am not on SS network when making the setting. my bad. Embarassed

huntlai: anyone get the same warning like me? i am on BB250 Innocent


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  Reply # 839686 19-Jun-2013 18:15
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Just make sure you are using Slingshot's DNS (or set it to automatically use ISP's DNS) then restart your modem/router. Worked for me!




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  Reply # 839748 19-Jun-2013 19:28
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This is kind of cool but I can see the next thread to pop is 'cant access netflix from slingshot' because netflix will blacklist slingshots (maybe even callplus's) entire IP range.

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  Reply # 839752 19-Jun-2013 19:31
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Regs:
nickb800:
Aaroona: So what services exactly does this open us up to? The text itself is vague, either that, or I am being dense. 

Are we talking about things like Hulu for example? 


If they never promise specific services, then they can't be blamed when Hulu (for instance) blocks them


why would hulu, or netflix block if they werent forced to?  who will tell them what ip addresses to block?  as far as they are concerned, they are limiting their service to geographic ip's as per what their contracts would state.  if some other company extends the US based geoocated ip address elsewhere, then its somewhat out of their control.  netflix, at least, would be making more money if there are ways to access it outside their geo regions.  they probably wouldnt shut it down by choice :)


The obvious answer would be the studios who sell content to netflix and make it a condition of the contract that netflix take reasonable precaution to only sell content to people in the regions they have licences for. Since they don't have licences for NZ, they might be required to stop selling when they become aware of people using this kind of service.

This might involve finding out what ip ranges slingshot own and blocking them completely, or it might even involve raising their authentication process to be something more bullet proof, e.g. Requiring US driving licence or dual factor authentication with a us mobile number or who know what.


Read the long post from whirlpool I posted, it explains how a standalone VPN service can get away with this whilst it will be much harder for an ISP to do it.
What slingshot has going for them in this case though is that they are relatively small and so might slip under the radar....but maybe they won't.


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  Reply # 839791 19-Jun-2013 20:09
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NonprayingMantis:
Regs:
nickb800:
Aaroona: So what services exactly does this open us up to? The text itself is vague, either that, or I am being dense. 

Are we talking about things like Hulu for example? 


If they never promise specific services, then they can't be blamed when Hulu (for instance) blocks them


why would hulu, or netflix block if they werent forced to?  who will tell them what ip addresses to block?  as far as they are concerned, they are limiting their service to geographic ip's as per what their contracts would state.  if some other company extends the US based geoocated ip address elsewhere, then its somewhat out of their control.  netflix, at least, would be making more money if there are ways to access it outside their geo regions.  they probably wouldnt shut it down by choice :)


The obvious answer would be the studios who sell content to netflix and make it a condition of the contract that netflix take reasonable precaution to only sell content to people in the regions they have licences for. Since they don't have licences for NZ, they might be required to stop selling when they become aware of people using this kind of service.

This might involve finding out what ip ranges slingshot own and blocking them completely, or it might even involve raising their authentication process to be something more bullet proof, e.g. Requiring US driving licence or dual factor authentication with a us mobile number or who know what.


Read the long post from whirlpool I posted, it explains how a standalone VPN service can get away with this whilst it will be much harder for an ISP to do it.
What slingshot has going for them in this case though is that they are relatively small and so might slip under the radar....but maybe they won't.





Agree.

Furthermore, what Slingshot is offering is essentially a workaround/hack of Netflix's system, so any change (not necessarily trying to boot foreign users) to Netflix's systems could break the workaround overnight. E.g Netflix currently accept NZ credit cards, if they change card processor that might stop that

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  Reply # 839868 19-Jun-2013 21:24
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How are they going to determine people who have this enabled are following the TOS. I.E they have an international visitor staying in their house. How do they verify this? also anyone who isnt technically skilled could activate this by accident without knowing what it does when they log into their account. Are they going to call up customers and ask for proof of this visitor?

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 839878 19-Jun-2013 21:39
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I like it except for one issue

If you are having issues turning Global Mode on then simply click here to visit our support page.


when u click here it leads to a page of nothing lol... No biggy, but thought i'd let ya's know....

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  Reply # 839904 19-Jun-2013 22:04
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worm9100: How are they going to determine people who have this enabled are following the TOS. I.E they have an international visitor staying in their house. How do they verify this? also anyone who isnt technically skilled could activate this by accident without knowing what it does when they log into their account. Are they going to call up customers and ask for proof of this visitor?

I don't think Slingshot care in the slightest, the whole international visitor thing is just a facade for NZers to access overseas content

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  Reply # 839918 19-Jun-2013 22:22
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Hmmm... i'm getting the

"Global Mode is currently ON for your Slingshot Broadband connection. However we have detected that you are not currently using Slingshot standard modem settings. Please see Slingshot Help for configuring your modem to use Global Mode."

message even though i have all the standard settings, including DNS servers, PPoa VCMux etc ... and have never changed them.

i can't imagine local network routing and QoS options would be a problem so what gives?



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  Reply # 839934 19-Jun-2013 22:38
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  Reply # 839955 19-Jun-2013 23:01
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I wonder how many visitors set up a Slingshot broadband account while on holiday? :P

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